CBMA fellows

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Ryan Ames

Research interests focus on how phenotype arises from complex systems, and generating accurate representations of cellular function using integrated interaction networks.

Area of expertise:

  • Systems biology
  • Evolutionary biology
  • Genome wide studies
  • Next generation sequence data analysis
  • Network analysis

Address: Centre for Biomedical Modelling and Analysis, University of Exeter, Living Systems Institute, Exeter EX4 4QD

Email: r.ames@exeter.ac.uk

Phone: 01392 72 7472

You can also visit Ryan's personal website.

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Matt Anderson

Matt's research involves on the mathematical modelling of complex networks, particularly the signalling pathways involved in cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, how these pathways interact with each other, and how they can be manipulated for desired therapeutic outcomes. Matt uses an interdisciplinary approach, collecting lab data to inform and drive modelling work, which in turn is used to focus further experimental studies.

Area of expertise:

  • Systems biology
  • Complex networks
  • Cell biology
  • Biochemistry
  • Image analysis

Address: Centre for Biomedical Modelling and Analysis, University of Exeter, Living Systems Institute, Exeter EX4 4QD

Email: M.W.Anderson@exeter.ac.uk

Phone: 01392 72 7471

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Benjamin Evans

Ben's research seeks to understand the emergent dynamics of neural systems and their dynamics through modelling techniques spanning multiple levels, from ion channels to networks. He is the author of PyRhO, a suite of computational tools for modelling and simulating opsins and maintains an interest in self-organisation through synaptic plasticity in response to environmental statistics. He also collaborates on several projects applying machine learning to combat Antimicrobial resistance, improve management of Type 1 Diabetes mellitus and non-invasively diagnose cancer from breath sample analysis.

Area of expertise:

  • Computational modelling
  • Neural networks
  • Machine Learning
  • High Performance Computing
  • Open and reproducible science

Address: Centre for Biomedical Modelling and Analysis, University of Exeter, Living Systems Institute, Exeter EX4 4QD

Email: b.d.evans@exeter.ac.uk

Phone: 01392 72 7471

Danny Galvis

Danny Galvis

Danny has been interested in the application of mathematics to biological systems since the beginning of his college career at Florida State University, where he completed a BS, MS, and PhD in Biomathematics. During this time, he developed an interest in mathematical neuroscience and began working with an interdisciplinary group of experimentalists and mathematicians in the Program in Neuroscience.

His PhD research focused primarily on applying a systems biology approach to the study of birdsong. He developed dynamical systems models for adult zebra finch song production that were constrained by behavioral studies, the anatomical structure of the song system, and the signaling properties of neurons and neural circuits. He then used these models to develop testable predictions about the behavioral effects of perturbing the song system.

Address: Centre for Biomedical Modelling and Analysis, University of Exeter, Living Systems Institute, Exeter, EX4 4QD

Email: D.Galvis@exeter.ac.uk

Phone: 01392 727 471

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Charlie Jeynes

Charlie's research investigates topics in imaging biology, in particular using nanoparticles to improve resolution, quantitate and model features in human cells related to diseases and ageing.

Area of expertise:

  • Advanced microscopy (super resolution and elemental microprobes).
  • Image analysis.
  • Modelling.
  • Nanoparticle biomarkers.
  • Elemental analysis.

Address: Centre for Biomedical Modelling and Analysis, University of Exeter, Living Systems Institute, Exeter, EX4 4QD

Email: j.c.g.jeynes@exeter.ac.uk

Phone: 01392 72 7473

You can also visit Charlie's personal website.

Ben Sherlock

Ben Sherlock

Ben has a background in Physics, having completed a MSci in Physics at Durham, and a DPhil in Atomic and Laser Physics at Oxford. Following his DPhil, Ben began research in the field of experimental Biophotonics and Biomedical Optics, initially with the Photonics group at Imperial College, and then latterly at the University of California, Davis.

For the past four years, the focus of his research has been the development of bespoke optical imaging systems that use label-free contrast mechanisms to provide new insight into high impact, challenging questions in biology and medicine. He has been responsible for projects to develop a handheld multiphoton microscope for high resolution, depth resolved imaging of human skin in vivo, and a multimodal fiber endoscope for monitoring structural and compositional changes during the maturation of vascular engineered tissue. He has worked in highly interdisciplinary environments and has come to appreciate the critical role that clear and effective communication plays in the delivery of successful research outcomes. His experience includes laser physics, optics and optical design, software development and image analysis.

Address: Centre for Biomedical Modelling and Analysis, University of Exeter, Living Systems Institute, Exeter, EX4 4QD

Email: B.Sherlock@exeter.ac.uk

Phone: 01392 727 471