John Danvers

John Danvers

The Buddha lived in Northern India 2,500 years ago. He was a teacher who realised that all beings live in a world of constant change and uncertainty. Based on his own experiences he developed ways of dealing with these uncertainties, enabling his students to find fulfilment and enjoyment as they tackled the stresses and strains of everyday life. It was important to the Buddha that his students shouldn’t just accept what he said, but that they should analyse what he said and ask if his methods worked in practice.

Meditation and mindfulness are very important skills taught by many Buddhist schools, including Zen. Different methods of awareness and thinking have been developed to enable us to gain a deeper understanding of who we are, to investigate how our minds work and to wake up to life in all its richness. Mindfulness also helps us to develop a balanced and compassionate view of ourselves, our fellow beings and the environment within which we all exist.

I have over 40 years experience of Zen Buddhist practice – grounded in the Japanese Soto Zen tradition and more recently learning from the approach taken by the Vietnamese Zen teacher, Thich Nhat Hanh. If you’d like to know more about my own background you’re welcome to visit my website.

As part of the multi-faith chaplaincy, I'm here for all students and staff - to listen, to provide support and to advise when I can. If you'd like someone to talk to, or you want to know more about Buddhism, or you have a particular question, issue or belief you'd like to discuss, I am available on Monday afternoons in the Chaplaincy Office in the Student Services are of the Forum. Or you can contact me at: j.danvers@exeter.ac.uk or on 07807 168494.