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Featured Academic of the Month

Featured ESI Academic of the Month

Dr Anne Leonard, NERC Innovation Fellow, is our Featured Academic for January 2021!

Click here to view her profile page.

 

Read Anne Leonard's paper based on the findings from the Beach User Health Survey:  A cross-sectional study on the prevalence of illness in coastal bathers compared to non-bathers in England and Wales in Water Research.

Read another relevant paper for her upcoming talk: Exposure to and colonisation by antibiotic-resistant E. coli in UK coastal water users: Environmental surveillance, exposure assessment, and epidemiological study (Beach Bum Survey) in Environment International.

Anne will be delivering the State of the Art talk “Interdisciplinary approaches to understanding the spread of microbes and antimicrobial resistance in aquatic environments” on Monday 25th January 1 – 2pm. ‌

Antimicrobials have been an important aspect of Western medicine in the management of infections since their manufacture and widespread use in the 1940s. However, antimicrobial resistance (the ability of microorganisms to survive and grow in the presence of antimicrobials) threatens our ability to manage the risks to health posed by microorganisms that cause infections. Until recently, research into the origins and spread of antimicrobial resistance has focused on the role of clinical settings and on microorganisms that cause infection. However, research is beginning to shed light on the important role that non-human, and particularly natural environments, play in the emergence, dissemination and transmission of resistance. This talk will describe recent and ongoing interdisciplinary research to understand the spread of microorganisms, particularly of antibiotic resistant bacteria, in aquatic environments associated with coastal bathing waters.

Are we exposed to antibiotic resistance in coastal waters?

Professor Karen Hudson-Edwards, Professor in Sustainable Mining is our Featured Academic for September 2020!

Click here to view her profile page.

 

Karen Hudson-Edwards was one of the speakers at the 4th September Camborne School of Mines Business Breakfast, where the theme was Tailings: Updates from QUEX (The Universities of Queensland and Exeter).

Karen was also part of the “Space Technology in Extreme Mining Environments” held on 8th September.  This was a collaborative event between South West Centre of Excellence in Satellite Applications (SWCoESA), Satellite Applications Catapult, MineSense and Exeter Extreme Environments. It summarised the challenges faced in working in extreme mining environments, and how satellite technology can help to solve these challenges.

Some of her newest publications:
Riley, A.L., MacDonald, J.M., Burke, I.T., Renforth, P., Jarvis, A.P., Hudson-Edwards, K.A., McKie, J., Mayes, W.M. (2020) Legacy iron and steel wastes in the UK: Extent, resource potential and management futuresJournal of Geochemical Exploration, 219, 106630.

Hubau, A., Guezennec, A.-G., Joulian, C., Falagan, C., Dew, D., Hudson-Edwards, K.A. (2020) Bioleaching to reprocess sulfidic polymetallic primary mining residues: Determination of metal leaching mechanismsHydrometallurgy, 197, 105484.

Li, W., Liu, J., Hudson-Edwards, K.A. (2020) Seasonal variations in arsenic mobility and bacteria diversity of Huangshui Creek, Shimen Realgar Mine, Hunan Province, ChinaScience of the Total Environment, 749, 142353.

 

The European Association of Geochemistry selected Karen as The Distinguished Lecturer 2019. 

This program aims to introduce and motivate scientists and students located in under-represented regions of the world to emerging research areas in geochemistry. The Distinguished Lecturer is selected each year based on a combination of outstanding research contributions to geochemistry and the ability to clearly communicate these contributions to a broad audience.

View her lectures from last years Distinguished Lecturer tour:

 

Karen gave the inaugural State of the Art talk “Exeter Extreme: The New University Hub and Examples from Mine Waste Environments” on Monday 28th September 1 – 2pm. ‌

Click here to view the video from her talk.

 

Dr Tomas Chaigneau, Senior Lecturer in Social Sciences for our Environment is our Featured Academic for October 2020!

Click here to view his profile page.

 

Tomas Chaigneau has recently been funded as Co-I (20%) on a FORMAS (Swedish research council) grant worth in total approximately £1,760,500. Carl Folke, Tomas Chaigneau. Anne-Sophie Crepin. Maike Hamann, Robert Heilmayr, Patrik Henriksson, Emilie Lindkvist, Juan Rocha Gordo, Caroline Schill, Andrew Tilman and Tong Wu: “Inequality and the Biosphere: Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals in an unequal world”  The project aims to identify synergies and trade-offs between reducing inequalities (SDG 10) and safeguarding the biosphere (SDGs 14 and 15). It will aim to identify patterns between different types of inequality and environmental indicators, understand the processes through which inequalities influences environmental behaviours and engage with stakeholders in across scales to identify practices that can harness win/win interactions between SDGs while minimizing trade-offs.

 

Leading up to Tomas Chaigneau’s #esiStateOfTheArt talk, read his paper about ‘Inequality and the Biosphere’ in the Annual Review of Environment and Resources.

Whilst behavioural economics research has provided critical insights into understanding and predicting environmental behaviours, an important consideration that remains largely unexplored is to what extent people behave differently given their differing wellbeing and poverty levels. This is particularly important when considering sustainable development which not only strives for environmental sustainability of marine and land based resources but also seeks to address inequality and the eradication of poverty in all its forms. There is a need to further expand our understanding of human behaviours by bringing together a large body of work from the social sciences on human wellbeing with insights from behavioural economics.”

 

Tomas gave the State of the Art talk “Striving for sustainability in an unequal world” on Monday 26th October 1 – 2pm. ‌

Inequality is one of the key social challenges of our time. Reducing inequality is not only a policy target for many nations but can also impact the biosphere, and as such, can shape the achievement of sustainable development goals. However, remarkably little work has sought to understand the effect of inequalities on the natural environment. This talk will explore what work has been done to date  on inequalities (in both natural and social systems) and its role in shaping environmental sustainability and introduce some preliminary findings and ongoing research on the topic. It will identify some of the key disciplines and concepts from the natural and social sciences that could start to unravel this complex link further, and discuss the merits of future research in such an unexplored research topic.

Click here to view the full video from his talk.

‌‌Dr Xiaoyu Yan, Senior Lecturer in Energy and Environment is our Featured Academic for November 2020!

Click here to view his profile page.

 

A new four-year project ‘GREENPEG’ has received a grant of €8.3 million from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme to develop new techniques to explore for pegmatite rocks containing lithium and other green technology metals. The University of Exeter team, which will receive nearly €780k, is led by Ben Williamson with Frances Wall, Camborne School of Mines and Xiaoyu Yan, Engineering, supported by post-doctoral researchers Kate Smith and Rob Pell.
https://www.exeter.ac.uk/esi/news/articles/newprojecttofindeuropesgre.php 

 

The University of Exeter will lead a pioneering new research centre, designed to revolutionize how crucial metals are extracted, used and reused in clean and digital technologies across the UK. This project will be led by Frances Wall, along with Xiaoyu Yan, Karen Hudson-Edwards and other colleagues from Camborne School of Mines, the Environment and Sustainability Institute, the Renewable Energy department and the Business School.
https://www.exeter.ac.uk/news/research/title_825455_en.html
https://www.ukri.org/news/circular-economy-centres-to-drive-uk-to-a-sustainable-future/

 

Xiaoyu is leading the Circular and Low Impact Processed Food (CLIP) project funded by European Regional Development Fund through the Agri-Tech Cornwall programme. CLIP aims to develop a freely available tool that can help better understand and ultimately improve the environmental performance of processed food products, ensuring the sustainability of the sector in the medium and long-term. We will work with processed food manufacturers in Cornwall, in the first instance Cornish Pasty makers, create the tool in a way that can help these businesses improve existing products and design new products.

 

Read his paper on plastic bottle vs glass bottle in Cornwall.“It is crucial to consider the waste infrastructure and management practices in place and use life cycle thinking-based models to evaluate any solutions to plastics pollution in order to avoid problem shifting.”
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0048969720321987?

 

A new publication in Energy Policy “Energy-food nexus in the marine environment: A macroeconomic analysis on offshore wind energy and seafood production in Scotland.”From a macroeconomic perspective, offshore wind farms have a negative, but limited, effect on seafood production sectors while having a positive impact on the economy overall and benefiting lower income households.
https://authors.elsevier.com/c/1c99R14YGgfKIs

 

Xiaoyu delivered the State of the Art talk “Quantifying environmental performance of human systems across socioeconomic scales” on Monday 30th November 1 – 2pm. ‌

Click here to view the full video from his talk.