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The Exeter Award

Enhance your employability

FCH

  • combine subjects not otherwise possible at Exeter
  • cross-subject degrees to suit your interests and career ambitions
  • leads to a named degree title of the subjects you study
  • study two subjects, or sometimes three
  • create your own themed pathway
  • vary the proportion of the subjects each year
  • add vocational elements to your studies
  • opportunities for study and work abroad

 

When students have completed the various stages of the programme successfully, they will receive the award of a Degree, either a BA or BSc, as appropriate to the subjects studied. They will be awarded the degree with a particular 'classification' - e.g., first-class, upper second, lower second depending on the marks they have received for the modules.

The conventions below set out the detailed rules by which a student's eligibility for a Degree is judged, and its classification is calculated. It also explains what happens when a student fails, or is unable to complete, some of the required assessed work.


Contents

1. Introduction

2. Definitions

3. Condonement

4. Progression procedures

5. Reassessment procedures

6. Classification of awards

7. Distinctions

8. Independent study

9. Coursework and dissertations – submission rules and penalties

10. Mitigation, referral and deferral

11. Transcripts

12. Medical or personal emergencies in the examination period

1 Introduction

1.1 The conventions and procedures described here are governed by the University’s Undergraduate Assessment Procedures (http://www.admin.ex.ac.uk/academic/tls/tqa/ugexams2.htm).

1.2 The FCH Board of Examiners

1.2.1 The Board of Examiners is nominated by the FCH Board of Studies and appointed by the Board of the Faculty of Taught Programmes on behalf of Senate.

1.2.2 The Board of Examiners is chaired by the FCH Director.

1.2.3 The Board of Examiners consists of academic staff representatives from each subject area teaching FCH students. Other members of staff who are members of the Board of Studies may attend as observers without voting rights. The Chair of the FCH Board of Studies is an ex officio member.

1.2.4 Mitigation affecting the submission criteria and deadlines of module coursework or the overall assessment of a module is handled by the academic unit (e.g. College, FCH or INTO) owning the module, and students should submit relevant evidence to the appropriate unit for consideration, following that unit's mitigation procedures.

The outcomes of mitigation decisions relating to assessment performance and deferral are shown (via SITS) next to the module marks in the students' assessment records presented to the FCH Examination Board. The FCH Examination Board receives these decisions.

1.3 External Examiners

1.3.1 External Examiners in the relevant academic units will moderate the assessment of individual modules as part of the academic units' assessment processes.

1.3.2 FCH will have an External Examiner appointed by Senate who will have experience of the operation of Modular/Flexible Combined Honours systems. The function of the External Examiner will be:

  • to be a member of the FCH Board of Examiners
  • to advise on the conduct of the Board of Examiners and on the operation of the conventions
  • to moderate examined assessments submitted for FCH-owned modules
  • to advise on the regulations and processes of the degree

1.4 The FCH Board of Examiners will operate within the provisions of these conventions. No other conventions as applied by other Colleges or academic units within the University shall be applied.

2 Definitions

The following definitions (in alphabetical order) are adopted for the purpose of this document

2.1 Assessed work : Work done during the course of the programme, the mark for which contributes to the assessment of the module of which it is a part, unlike formative work.

2.2 Award of Credit : The pass mark for individual modules and award of associated credits is 40%. Marks below 40% constitute failure. Failure of modules at any stage will normally be required to be condoned or reassessed.

2.3 Classification Bands for summative assessment (see below) are as follows: First Class – 70% and above; Upper Second – 60-69%; Lower Second – 50-59%; Third – 40-49%; Fail – 39% and below.

2.4 Condonement : The process that allows a stage to be passed despite failure to achieve 120 credits in the stage, provided that a stage average of at least 40% has been achieved over the 120 credits of assessment, including the marks for any failed and condoned modules.

2.4.1 Normally, only up to 30 credits can be condoned per stage, and some FCH subject areas may exempt some or all modules from condonement, as specified on the relevant FCH subject web pages.

2.4.2 On the student transcript no credit will be given for condoned marks, and such marks will be recorded on the student transcript in their original form. Students will not be given the opportunity of reassessment in the condoned credit.

2.5 Credits : Within this document Credits refers to the values attached to modules and accumulated by students in order to progress through their degree programmes.

2.6 Deferral : A first attempt at an individual assessment allowed to a student who for good reason has been prevented from previously completing it. Deferrals shall normally take place within one calendar year of the initial assessment.

2.7 Levels and Stages : A level is an indicator of the relative demand, complexity and depth of learning associated with a module or stages of a programme.

2.7.1 Each stage of a programme consists of 120 credits of modules at a level (or mix of levels) appropriate for that stage and agreed with each student by the FCH Director and the relevant subject co-ordinators.

2.7.2 Due to the variation in credit values used by academic units for modules, occasionally it is difficult to make the combination of modules add up exactly to 120 credits for a particular FCH stage. In such cases, students may take 120 ± 5 credits, with approval from the FCH Director, provided the difference from 120 is balanced the following year.

2.7.3 Programmes of 360 credits therefore consist of three stages, and programmes of 480 credits of four stages.

2.7.4 For full-time students, there will typically be a clear relation between years of study and stages. For part-time students, a stage may require two or more years of study of modules totalling 120 credits.

2.7.5 For further reference, see the Levels and Awards Framework in the University's TQA Manual.

2.8 Marks : All modules, however they are assessed, should result in a single mark expressed as a percentage. The FCH Board of Examiners processes confirmed final marks for modules. Hence academic units must ensure that the mark recorded in SITS when the FCH Board meets is final and agreed by the relevant subject Examination Board. The mark will not be subject to revision at the FCH Board of Examiners. Nevertheless, the FCH Board of Examiners reserves the right to make an award higher than that indicated by a student’s profile of final marks, provided there is mitigation and/or other exceptional circumstances. All such cases should be fully documented and minuted.

2.8.1 The FCH Board and students should be aware that the SITS system, when displaying a module mark, rounds all marks of .5 and above up, and all those below .5 down.  This rounding does not, however, affect the calculation of the overall mark itself, which is based on the unrounded marks.

2.9 Reassessment : The process by which failure or non-completion of assessment is handled through deferral, referral or repeat study.

2.10 Referral : A further attempt, following initial failure, at a module assessment/examination without the requirement to repeat any attendance.

2.11 Repeat Study : A further attempt, following an initial or second failure, at a module assessment/examination, with a requirement that it be taken only following the equivalent of the period necessary to repeat the associated module in its entirety.

2.11.1 In some instances individual candidates will be permitted to repeat "with or without attendance"; in others "attendance" or "non-attendance" may be specified.

2.11.2 Repeat study can be of individual modules or of an entire stage of study.

2.11.3 Repeat study is only allowed if there is sufficient mitigation to excuse failure at a particular stage and is normally only available once throughout a student’s period of study.

2.12 Stage Average : The average mark a student has achieved over all credits assessed in one stage (expressed as a percentage and combining individual module marks with weightings which reflect the credit attached to each).

2.13 Study or Work Abroad : Students who have successfully passed a year abroad shall have their credits for that year regarded as 30 credits for purposes of classification.

2.13.1 Students who fail a year abroad may be referred, and if this is not possible or if, after referral, they still cannot satisfy the host institution or employer, they may be permitted to revert to a three year overall degree programme, i.e. without "with Study/Work abroad" appearing as part of their degree title. In such a case the appropriate fail mark for 30 credits must appear in the programme for purposes of classification.

2.14 Weighted average : the total of weighted marks (see below) divided by the total number of credits taken.

2.15 Weighted mark : the combined mark for all the assessed components of the module, rounded arithmetically, multiplied by its credit value.

3 Condonement

3.1 Condonement (as defined in 2.4) is the process that allows a stage to be passed despite failure to achieve 120 credits in the stage, provided that a stage average of at least 40% has been achieved over the 120 credits of assessment including the marks for any failed and condoned modules.

3.2 Up to 30 credits can be condoned per stage in any module taken within the programme of study, providing the conditions outlined in 3.1 are met.

3.3 Students will not be given the opportunity of reassessment in the condoned credit.

3.4 On the student transcript no credit will be given for condoned marks, and such marks will be recorded on the student transcript in their original form.

3.5 Titles of degrees are determined by the FCH Board of Studies during the student's final year, to reflect the student's overall programme of study. The FCH Board of Examiners may alter degree titles where modules have been condoned.

3.6 Students who have taken a number of Law modules as part of their FCH degree and who wish to apply to take a qualifying law degree, such as the University's BA Law, after their FCH degree should bear in mind the following Law Society requirements regarding condonement of failed modules:

"A separate spreadsheet should be submitted for those who have received condoned passes in foundation subjects if the university considers that the Society should use its discretion and recognize the passes. The document should list the names of the individuals together with the mark for the condoned subject. The spreadsheet should be sent to ExceptionResults@lawsociety.org.uk.

Each of the applications must be supported with a degree transcript, a letter of support from the Head of Department and a copy of the relevant minutes of the exam board at which the student's situation was discussed. Supporting documentation should be sent to the Professional Competence Team.

Note: The Society will only condone a fail in a single subject where the mark achieved is between 35 and 39 inclusive."

4 Progression Procedures

4.1 Absence from Examinations :

4.1.1 The treatment of students failing to undertake examined assessments will be as follows:

(a) If a student is absent from examination(s) with properly documented medical, or other extreme personal circumstances, which are known by and acceptable to the mitigation committee of the academic unit owning the module before the meeting of the FCH Board of Examiners, the examination(s) will normally be deferred.

(b) If a student produces an acceptable reason explaining their absence to the Board of Examiners which does not fall under (a) above, the Board of Examiners will regard the absence as a fail with a mark of 0 for the module(s) in question and subsequently treat the mark in the same way as any other failure.

(c) If no acceptable reason for absence is produced by the student to the Board of Examiners, a recommendation will be made to Taught Faculty Board to deem the student to have withdrawn from the University.

4.2 Progression :

4.2.1 At any stage, progression (including progression to award in the final stage) will operate as follows:

4.2.2 Pass in accordance with these conventions, which will require assessment in 120 credits ( ± 5 credits - see above 2.7) at the stage and a stage average of at least 40%

4.2.3 Normally, up to 30 credits of failure may be condoned at any stage

4.2.4 In cases where there is more than 30 credits of failure, the Board will either condone the lowest of the module fail marks where the number of credits is equal between the modules failed (e.g. if the student has 2 modules, each worth 30 credits, of failure, the module with the lower mark will be condoned) or condone the module in which the student has a greater weight of failed credits (e.g. if a student has 45 credits of failure in one 30 credit and one 15 credit module, the 30 credit module will be condoned even where it has been awarded a higher mark). Any remaining failed modules that cannot be condoned, and are being taken for the first time, are normally subject to referral.

4.2.5 Note that no condonement is possible where the stage average is below 40%.

4.3 Level 1 modules which are taken as part of the student’s programme at Stages 2, 3 or 4 will be assessed as if they were modules at those Stages and moderated by External Examiners.

5 Reassessment Procedures

5.1 Referral :

5.1.1 If students fail a module for the first time, and cannot be condoned in the failure then referral can be recommended. Referrals will usually be held in the August/September assessment period, or, otherwise, normally at the next assessment period.

5.1.1.1 Students successful in any referred assessment will have only the mark of 40% recorded for the relevant module.

5.1.1.2 Unsuccessful students will have the higher of the two fail marks recorded for progression and classification purposes (i.e. the higher of the mark in the original assessment or that in the referral).

5.1.1.3 A referred student must be examined on the syllabus and in accordance with the assessment requirements in force at the time of the original assessment, or a reasonable alternative form of assessment will be offered where the original assessment is not viable (e.g. where it was group work or a seminar presentation).

5.1.2 Where a student fails part of a module's assessment, but, under the conventions of the academic unit delivering the module, passes the module as a whole, the student will be regarded as having passed the module by the FCH Board of Examiners.

5.1.3 Where a student fails part of a module's assessment, and, under the conventions of the academic unit delivering the module, fails the module overall for the first time, and the module cannot be condoned, unless the academic unit's conventions for that module are otherwise, the student will normally be referred in the failed element(s) only, with the module mark capped at 40%.

5.2 Repeat Study :

5.2.1 If a student fails one or more modules for the first time, cannot be condoned in the failure and it is felt that mitigating circumstances make repeat study more appropriate than referral, then repeat study in some or all of the modules of that stage can be recommended.

5.2.2 If a student fails one or more referred modules, cannot be condoned in the failure and only if there is sufficient mitigation to excuse the resulting failure, repeat study in some of the modules or the entire stage (120 credits) can be recommended.

5.2.3 Students required to repeat a stage (120 credits) or individual modules will normally be expected to do so with attendance. Such students will be treated as though they are new registrations and will have recorded the actual marks they achieve in all assessments in all repeat modules. Students repeating a stage will normally start at the beginning of the next academic year.

5.2.4 The opportunity to repeat a stage will normally only be available once throughout a student’s programme of study.

5.2.5 Students repeating individual modules will normally start at the beginning of the next available delivery of the module(s).

5.2.6 Students must make application to the Taught Faculty Board through FCH if they wish to delay their repeat study.

5.3 Deferral :

5.3.1 If a student is prevented from completing assessment requirements for one or more modules for valid mitigation then deferral may be recommended.

5.3.2 Deferrals will usually be held in the August/September assessment period, or, otherwise, normally within one calendar year of the initial assessment.

5.3.3 Students will only be permitted to sit deferred assessments if the FCH Board of Examiners has received such decisions from the appropriate mitigation committee(s).

5.3.4 A deferred student is normally examined on the syllabus and in accordance with the assessment requirements in force at the time of the original assessment, or a reasonable alternative form of assessment will be offered where the original assessment is not viable (e.g. where it was group work or a seminar presentation).

5.4 Consequences of Failure in Referred Assessments

5.4.1 Absence from referred examination(s) will be treated as described in 4.1. Success or failure in a deferred referral will be treated as it would be for a referral.

5.4.2 Where, after referral, a student still has failed marks beyond those which permit progression to the next stage or to classification of the award (according to 4.2) the FCH Board of Studies can recommend to Taught Faculty Board:

5.4.2.1 An award commensurate with the results achieved. In particular, at the summative assessment an unclassified Ordinary Degree can be awarded based on achievement of an overall average of 40% in the assessment of at least 300 credits for a three stage programme (including not more than 180 credits of level 1 modules and at least 60 credits of level 3 modules) or at least 420 credits for a four stage programme (including not more than 180 credits of level 1 modules and at least 120 credits of level 3 modules). Standard rules for condonement in individual stages apply (see 3 and 4.2.2–4) and the overall average referred to combines individual module marks with weightings which reflect the credit attached to each.

5.4.2.2 Allowing the student to proceed to an alternative award  commensurate with results that can still be achieved. In particular, students must have successfully accumulated at least 180 credits for a recommendation to proceed to the Ordinary Degree for a three Stage programme, or 270 credits (including no more than 180 at Level 1) for a recommendation to proceed to the Ordinary Degree for a four Stage programme.

5.4.2.3 Allowing progression carrying the failure. This may be recommended subject to a maximum of 30 credits and normally only in the following circumstances:

(i) Where, following referral, progression would normally be allowable under general requirements (40% Stage average and 90 credits achieved at the Stage), but some or all of the credits still failed are not condoneable.

(ii) Where, following referral, a student has achieved a Stage average of 40%, but has not achieved 90 credits at the stage.

In recommending a candidate to proceed to the next stage under these circumstances, The FCH Board of Studies must make recommendations to Taught Faculty Board taking into account the academic requirements of the programme at future stages. Students must be carefully advised over any implications for module choice, prerequisites at the next stage, assessment requirements and financial support. In addition the FCH Board of Studies should be confident of the candidate’s ability to pass the assessment(s) carried while also studying (if full-time) for the 120 credits of the next stage. Taught Faculty Board will also consider recommendations from the FCH Board of Studies which involve taking a replacement module (or modules) (where permissible under the programme specifications and to a maximum of 30 credits).

5.4.2.4 Allowing repeat study of part or all of the stage. The FCH Board of Studies must make recommendations to Taught Faculty Board if it considers that after referral the student could ultimately meet the requirements of the programme but needs repeat study to provide the necessary foundation. Note that repeat study is only allowed if there is sufficient mitigation to excuse the failure after referral and is normally only available once throughout a student’s period of study.

5.4.2.5 Withdrawal from the programme.

5.5 Consequences of Failure in Deferred Assessments

5.5.1 Absence from deferred examination(s) will be treated as described in 4.1 except that an Aegrotat pass or award may also be considered in relation to missed deferral as described in 5.7.

5.5.2 Where, after deferral, a student still has failed marks beyond those which permit progression to the next stage or to classification of the award (according to 4.2) the FCH Board of Studies can recommend to Taught Faculty Board:

5.5.2.1 Progress and referral at the next assessment period: This may be recommended where a student fails deferred assessment in August/September subject to a maximum of 30 credits and normally only in the following circumstances:

(i) Where, following deferral, progression would normally be allowable under general requirements (40% Stage average and 90 credits achieved at the Stage), but some or all of the credits still failed are not condoneable.

(ii) Where, following deferral, a student has achieved a Stage average of 40%, but has not achieved 90 credits at the stage.

In recommending a candidate to proceed to the next stage under these circumstances, the FCH Board of Studies must make recommendations to Taught Faculty Board taking into account the academic requirements of the programme at future stages. Students must be carefully advised over any implications for module choice, prerequisites at the next stage, assessment requirements and financial support In addition the FCH Board of Studies should be confident of the candidate’s ability to pass the assessment(s) carried while also studying (if full-time) for the 120 credits of the next stage.

5.5.2.2 Non-Progression and referral at the next assessment period : This may be recommended where the failure exceeds 30 credits, or where the failure totals 30 credits or below but the FCH Board of Studies is not satisfied that the student can progress to the next stage carrying a referral in the failed assessment(s). Such students must pass the referred assessment(s), normally at the next available assessment period, prior to progression.

5.5.2.3 Alternative recommendations : Taught Faculty Board may allow alternative recommendations which could include the setting of a referred examination in late September or the interruption of a student’s studies until a referred assessment has been completed.

5.7 Aegrotat Pass and Aegrotat Awards

5.7.1 Where students are prevented by illness or exceptional personal circumstances from taking a deferred assessment at any stage they may request that an Aegrotat pass or, at the final stage, the award of an unclassified Aegrotat degree be considered under the terms of Ordinance 13.

5.7.2 Under the terms of Ordinance 13, an Aegrotat Pass or Award will be permitted on one occasion only during the course of a student’s programme of study. Where an Aegrotat Pass has been granted in a student’s stage 2  (or in stage 2 or stage 3 in a four stage programme), the Board of Examiners will base summative assessment including classification of award on the results available for the stage(s) not affected by the Aegrotat Pass.

6 Classification of Awards

6.1 Award of an honours degree or lesser award. The award of an honours degree of the University is dependent on the successful achievement of a programme that complies with the credit requirements detailed in the Levels and Awards Framework.

Candidates who fail to meet the requirements for the award of an honours degree may be eligible for a lesser award, e.g. an Ordinary Degree – see section beginning 5.4.2 and also see the University Levels and Awards Framework.

6.2 Awards are determined by the FCH Board of Examiners exercising judgment of the class that best represents the candidate’s achievement based on the overall level of performance. A Board of Examiners may, where it decides there are adequate grounds and in appropriate and fully documented circumstances, recommend raising a classification beyond that indicated by the profile of marks in accordance with the assessment conventions for the programme. The minutes of the Board of Examiners must clearly identify all such cases and provide a brief justification for the decision. All such decisions are subject to approval by the Dean of Taught Faculty.

6.3 The mark sheets submitted to the Board of Examiners record the following information for each candidate:

(a) The credit value of each summative assessment point.
(b) The mark awarded for each summative assessment point.
(c) The weighted average mark for the assessment as a whole.
(d) The number of credits obtained in each class.

6.4 As stipulated in Section 5.1.1.1 all modules passed only on referral are recorded as 40%, and this mark is the mark used to calculate the weighted average.

6.5 The final mark for each module is agreed before the FCH Examination Board meets by the various subject Boards and at a time when candidates are still anonymous. Apart from mistakes on mark sheets, which must be checked and corrected at the FCH Examination Board before final classification begins, no mark may be altered at the FCH Board.

6.6 Stage weighting : The marks achieved for stage 1 (the first 120 credits of the programme) will not count towards classification. The weighting of all other stages will contribute to the final weighted mark as follows:

6.6.1 Three year undergraduate programmes

The combined average of the second and third stages weighted 1:2

6.6.2 Four year programmes with year abroad* in Stage 2

The combined average of the second, third and fourth stages weighted 1:4:8

6.6.3 Four year programmes with year abroad* in Stage 3

The combined average of the second, third and fourth stages weighted 2:1:4

* NB: The term “Year abroad” here also includes other forms of study outside the University, such as industrial placements.

6.7 Final weighted mark : The final weighted mark for the summative classification of the award is calculated from stage averages from all stages excluding stage 1, weighted according to the stage weighting above.

6.8 Rules for classification : The rules should be applied in descending order as presented below, starting at the Pass / Fail threshold, so that fail students are excluded from further consideration.

6.8.1 Pass / Fail threshold for the programme

The pass / fail threshold for the Stage is stage average of 40.00%

6.8.2 First

A final weighted mark greater than or equal to 68.00% and modules to the value of at least 50% of stage weighted credits with a module mark greater than or equal to 69.50%

or

A final weighted mark greater than or equal to 69.50%

6.8.3 Upper second 

A final weighted mark greater than or equal to 58.00% and modules to the value of at least 50% of stage weighted credits with a module mark greater than or equal to 59.50%

or

A final weighted mark greater than or equal to 59.50%

6.8.4 Lower second

A final weighted mark greater than or equal to 48.00% and modules to the value of at least 50% of stage weighted credits with a module mark greater than or equal to 49.50%

or  

A final weighted mark greater than or equal to 49.50%

6.8.5 Third 

A final weighted mark greater than or equal to 39.50%

7 Distinctions

7.1 Students taking fields of study involving Modern Languages may, on the recommendation of the subject Examiners, be awarded a Distinction in the oral examination(s).

8 Independent Study

8.1 Work undertaken by Independent Study will be assessed by the academic unit(s) to which the supervisor(s) belong(s). A single mark for the module is recorded in SITS.

8.2 Independent Study is an element of assessment only available to FCH students. It is governed by FCH conventions:

8.2.1 The deadline for the submission of Independent Study is 4 pm of the second Tuesday of the summer term. It is submitted to the FCH Office.

8.2.2 Any work submitted after the deadline will be subject to penalties:

  • From immediately after the deadline until up to 14 days after it, the maximum mark for the whole module is 40%
  • More than 14 days beyond a submission date the mark for the whole module is zero.

8.2.3 The mark entered in SITS is adjusted to reflect the imposition of penalties.

9 Coursework and Dissertations - submission rules and penalties

9.1 FCH students are governed by the rules of the academic unit owning the modules they take in respect of submission criteria and deadlines for coursework, essays, dissertations, etc., and the appropriate academic unit's penalties where criteria and deadlines are not met will be applied. The mark entered in SITS is adjusted to reflect the imposition of penalties.

10 Mitigation, referral and deferral

10.1 Mitigating Evidence

10.1.1 The FCH Examination Board may modify assessment conventions in the light of the module-level decisions of the academic units' Mitigation Committees.

10.1.2 The FCH Mitigation Committee will meet before the FCH Examination Board to consider any student application for mitigation for FCH-owned modules, and indicate appropriate decisions on the marks sheets presented to the FCH Examination Board as to how the mitigating circumstances have affected a student’s performance in assessments. The FCH Mitigation Committee will also consider applications for deferral of assessment of FCH-owned modules.

10.1.3 It is the responsibility of students to notify FCH of any serious and unexpected circumstances which have had a disruptive impact on their studies in FCH-owned modules, through completion of an FCH application form for consideration of mitigation, setting out the modules and/or assessments which they claim have been affected, together with independent written supporting evidence. This process is explained to students at http://www.exeter.ac.uk/fch/study-problems/fchmitigation.php

10.1.4 The ‘evidence’ to be considered in each case by the FCH Mitigation Committee means appropriate written or printed material, such as the report of a professional with relevant expertise, e.g. normally a medical note. It excludes self-certification, the personal opinions of Mitigation Committee members, tutors, parents etc, and information of a medical nature reported orally by such people to Mitigation Committee members at second or third hand.

10.1.5 Membership of the FCH Mitigation Committee will include the chair of the FCH Board of Studies (or representative), the FCH Director, the FCH Administrator(s), and normally at least three members of the FCH Board of Examiners.

10.1.6 The Mitigation Committee follows the University's Code of Good Practice: Mitigation Committees (http://admin.exeter.ac.uk/academic/tls/tqa/Part%208/8V%20MitigationCttees_CoP.pdf) in regard to its options for decisions.

10.2 September Assessment Arrangements

10.2.1 The FCH Board of Examiners will be reconvened in September to consider classification and progression for those taking referred and deferred assessments.

10.2.2 The Board of Examiners will be constituted from those members available, but must include the Chair of the FCH Board of Studies (or representative) and the FCH Director. All members of the Board are informed and where possible consulted. The FCH external examiner is not required to attend, but will be consulted as appropriate.

10.2.3 Where appropriate (i.e. for modules contributing to summative assessment) the opinion of subject-level External Examiners will be obtained and their endorsement of the results recorded in writing.

11 Transcripts

11.1 Student transcripts will always record the actual numerical marks obtained for modules (in the case of two failures, the higher mark is to be recorded).  Marks for referred modules, where 40% is the maximum achievable, will also carry an indicator to specify that the mark has been capped at 40%.

12 Medical or personal emergencies in the examination period

12.1 In this context the convention of the University has been to allow the award and classification of an Honours Degree to students for whom no more than 25% of the component marks on which such classifications would normally be based are missing.


Revised February 2011

- Section 4.1.1 altered to include the concept of 'acceptable' to the reasons for examination absence. This was proposed and accepted for future assessment conventions at the FCH Exam Board of summer 2010/11.

Revised June 2011

- All references to 'Schools' replaced by 'Colleges' to reflect changes to the University's organisation in the summer of 2010.

- Section 1.2.4 revised to reflect the Mitigation processes introduced by the University for 2010/11.

Revised June 2012

- Section of classification regulations referring to students entering degrees before 2007 deleted. Subsequent sections renumbered.

- Sections 1.2.4 and 10.1 revised to reflect the Mitigation processes introduced by the University for 2011/12.

- Section 1.3.2 additional function of external examiner to moderate assessments for FCH-owned modules.

- The word 'College' changed in several places to 'academic unit' to reflect the variation in academic ownership of and procedures relating to modules.

- Section 10.2 September referral/deferral board revised to indicate role of external examiner.