The Business of Brexit

The Business of Brexit Grand Challenge explores how businesses can maximise the opportunities and reduce the costs of Britain being due to leave the EU in 2019, including considering the impacts on higher education. Check out the 'Week' tab for more information!

The enquiry groups you will be able to choose from are likely to include, but probably not limited to, the topics below. During this challenge you will explore and answer these questions and present your findings. Keep checking back here to find updates on visiting speakers and activities!

In March 2017 we welcomed Chris Huhne, former Energy Secretary, who gave a fascinating talk on the future of Brexit. Further events to come! 

During Grand Challenges week, you will work in sub-groups, each looking at a different aspect of Brexit. Students' Guild President Toby Gladwin and Vice President for Activities Tristan Gatward will be leading an investigation on how leaving the EU will affect higher education, using Exeter as a case study.

We will be hosting a range of expert visiting speakers including the former Energy Secretary Chris Huhne (13th March, 18:30 - 19:30, Henderson Lecture Theatre Xfi) and Eamonn Butler, Director of the Adam Smith Institute (date to be arranged). Leading academics from the University of Exeter will also be participating, including Christina Dargenidou looking into Brexit and Exporting, Kevin McMeeking considering Brexit and the City, John Maloney covering Brexit Opportunities and Costs and Claudio Radaelli looking at Brexit and Politics.

What strategy (purchasing, selling, hedging against risk, setting up / closing down branches abroad) should different kinds of business follow?

With Prime Minister Theresa May keeping her Brexit plans under wraps, we ask how many versions of Brexit are actually going to be on offer? Which one should business prefer? Does the answer depend on the kind of business? How should they put pressure on the government to get a better chance of getting their desired version?  Issues here would include free immigration from the EU, the degrees of withdrawal from the single market, stay or leave the customs union (and the kind of trade agreements we should seek with the rest of the world if we do leave the customs union), what to do about non-tariff barriers  etc.

Which version of Brexit should the government be going for from a public policy point of view? How much / little leeway has it got, given the attitudes of the governments of the EU-27 and the civil servants in Brussels?

You will consider economic forecasts of the benefits and costs of different forms of Brexit.  Why did the Treasury estimate the short- term and long-term costs as so large?  How to explain the contrast with Economists for Brexit, whose study found net benefits to the economy?  Does the various research throw any light on what kind of Brexit we should go for, as opposed to reigniting Leave / Remain arguments rendered obsolete  by the referendum vote?

. Students' Guild President Toby Gladwin and Vice President for Activities Tristan Gatward will be leading an investigation on how leaving the EU will affect higher education, using Exeter as a case study.