Students in a lecture

Session 1: 29 June - 20 July 2019  

This module introduces you to the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme, implemented across England from 2008. The programme sought to address a significant problem in the provision of psychological therapies within England, but is a challenge experienced in many parts of the world. That is, limited access to ‘evidence-based psychological therapies’ for the treatment of ‘high-prevalence’ or ‘common’ mental health problems, often resulting in very long waiting times and difficulties concerning the acceptability of treatments being offered, or in meeting the needs of people with some feature of diversity.

The module is also designed to provide you with knowledge concerning the presentation of common mental health difficulties and equip you with a theoretical understanding of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). Further, the module provides you with a critical appreciation as to how the organisation of mental health service delivery, development of a new mental health workforce and implementation of low-intensity CBT is being used to address problems regarding the availability of evidence based psychological therapies and excessive waiting times.

To ensure equity of access for all groups in society there is also an emphasis throughout the module on several key principles surrounding diversity and adaptations to psychological therapy practice that may be required to ensure the specific needs and preferences of a range of patient groups are met, such as children and young adults.

Whilst addressing many of the theoretical issues surrounding the area of psychological therapies, diversity and evidence-based practice, the module is also rooted in clinical practice. This is enhanced by many of the teaching team being experienced psychological therapists and/or researchers in psychological therapies which informs the module assessment. In groups you are asked to develop a ‘patient’ information leaflet on mental health issues affecting an international student population.

Further, the module is enhanced with interactive activity based group learning sessions throughout. These sessions help you apply the theoretical knowledge gained through lectures and seminars. Through activity based learning, you also begin to gain an appreciation of some of the clinical skills used by low-intensity CBT practitioners, for example, low-intensity CBT assessment and motivational interviewing techniques.

 

 

Which promises are legally binding, and which are not? What happens if you break a promise? In what circumstances can you escape from your promise? These are the fundamental questions of contract law. And contract law is important because of the extent to which it governs our lives: when we are shopping in the supermarket, or renting a house, or employed at work, or booking a holiday - most of our transactions, whether routine or exceptional, are contractual. This module will provide an introduction to the major principles of English contract law.

 

 

This module explores the economic, societal and environmental impacts and implications of climate change, as well as the technological solutions available; focusing on research currently being done by academics at the University of Exeter. The course begins with a general introduction to Climate Change and then examines three main topics in greater detail: Water Resources and Engineering, Renewable Energy, and Earth Systems. This is a technical program, coordinated by the College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, and is centred around the theory and application of climate change science. Although not a requisite, it is desirable to have a scientific background, and you can expect to come across technical terminology during this course

Specific topics related to Climate Change include:

• Causes and effects
• Social, economic and political impacts
• Environmental impacts and the threat to ecosystem services
• Modelling and prediction
• Adaptation and mitigation of catastrophic events
• Management of water resources and rainfall changes
• Renewable energy technologies and policies for a low carbon society
• Climate Tipping Points

We will explore these issues within a multidisciplinary framework with lectures, workshops and practical exercises led by world-class researchers in engineering, physics, mathematics, biological, and environmental sciences.

This module aims to give you a broad vision and perspective on global climate change: its mechanisms and underlying science, a look at impacts upon society and the environment, and the technologies that can be employed to mitigate its effects, including adaptation strategies.

This course focuses on the growth and management of global enterprises from the emergence of the modern multinational to the present day. In studying the dynamics of international business we take these enterprises (commonly referred to as MNEs, MNCs or TNCs) as our key actors, and use an interdisciplinary approach to assess the challenges associated with developing strategies and managing operations across national boundaries. We explore, therefore, the interplay between the multinational enterprise, the countries in which it does business, and the competitive environment in which it operates. This approach will ensure that global enterprise is framed in a wide political, social, historical and economic context.

Throughout the course we consider firms from across the globe, and draw particular attention to the rise of large-scale enterprises from the BRIC economies (Brazil, Russia, India and China). We will also address the classic problems of modes of entry, global coordination, and local responsiveness. Public and political attitudes to “foreign” firms are also considered, and we challenge our sense of what constitutes ethical business practice. Students will be encouraged to reflect on cultural values, question their own assumptions and develop knowledge of other cultures through class discussions and group work. Employability skills are further developed through the giving of presentations, case-study analysis, team-working, and report-writing.

Overall the course aims to improve students’ knowledge of the modern multinational, and to foster systematic and informed analysis of how multinational enterprises operate, thrive, stagnate or fail in an integrated global economy.

This stimulating course will provide you with the opportunity to engage with some of the most challenging and pressing issues of international relations and conflict.  You will explore the main characteristics of today’s global security environment, from terrorism to tensions produced by climate change, from nuclear proliferation to the migration crisis.   

You will consider how various schools of thought can decisively strengthen our analysis of these issues, which will lead to an appreciation of the complex role of factors like military capabilities, economic structures, international institutions, identities and ideologies, or language and emotions.

Teaching will be delivered by leading experts on international affairs, conflict, security and peace studies, who have published in the most respected journals of the field. The programme adopts a dynamic format of interactive lectures and seminars, and will include a negotiation simulation, a policy role play and extensive discussions on cutting-edge research, in an enriching multicultural setting.

Preventive Medicine: Exercise and the Environment offers a detailed exploration into preventive health issues related to physical activity and the environment. Drawing upon sustained research in these topics at Exeter, you will gain a deeper understanding of the science behind the interaction of physical activity and the environment with health across the lifespan.

This course is aimed primarily at those undergraduates and graduates with a keen interest in exercise, physical activity, health, medicine and the environment. If you have a background in biology, sports science, kinesiology, medicine, psychology, or professions allied to medicine, you will be well prepared for this course.

Topics will include physiological and psychological aspects of health and wellbeing, natural and virtual environments and their impact on health. These topics will encompass the lifespan, from childhood to old age. You will be able to interact with internationally renowned and world-class researchers over a series of lectures, seminars and practical sessions and have a chance to practise and promote preventive medicine.

The programme creates a challenge for you academically whilst also providing you with the skills to apply theoretical concepts in real-world laboratory and field settings. The aims of the course are:

To provide a thought-provoking and insightful examination of the interaction between physical activity, the environment and our health which reflects the University’s strong and unique reputation for internationally excellent multi-method and multidisciplinary research and teachings in this field.
To provide a sound basis in quantitative approaches to the study of physical activity, exercise and health.
To work with the research expertise of staff across various, diverse disciplines (psychology, physiology, exercise medicine, paediatric exercise science, the environment) to allow a rounded exploration of how physical activity and the environment can influence population health.

This module aims to explore the processes by which Shakespeare’s plays came into existence, how they achieved their unique status in English literature and culture, and how the image of the genius ‘Bard’ problematizes understandings of Shakespeare’s plays as part of Shakespeare’s own world and our own. Following global commemorative celebrations of the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare's death in 2016, the module will include examining issues that surround memorializing the dead, both in Shakespeare’s own time and our own.

The module focuses its attention upon A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Hamlet and The Tempest. Through a combination of play-specific classes, performance workshops, and classes dedicated to the details of historical context students will examine:

  • the contexts of the plays’ initial production and reception

  • the implications of Shakespearean and modern performance practices in understanding Shakespeare’s plays

  • myths that have become associated with Shakespeare , the origin of such myths and their influence over contemporary engagements with Shakespeare’s plays

Guided by experts from Exeter University’s English and Drama Departments, students will encounter the nuances and richness available within the field of Shakespeare Studies, which a static image of the isolated Bard simply does not allow.

The course includes going to see a play at the world famous Globe Theatre in London which will help you put performance theory into practice.

J.R.R. Tolkien is one of the most influential writers of the twentieth century. His fiction has in the past 15 years inspired six blockbuster movies, as well as several independent films, yet he is one of the most neglected figures in academic literary criticism. This module begins by focusing on Tolkien’s major fiction published during his lifetime – The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings – as well as several minor and posthumous works, including an introduction to The Silmarillion. It will then move to the Ralph Bakshi and Peter Jackson film treatments, as well as and other examples of reception in literature and in different media, such as music, gaming, and ephemera. The module will also consider how far Tolkien’s experience of place, including his trips to Cornwall, Devon, and the West Country affected his work; field trips to some of these locations, including the castle ruins at Tintagel, will inspire your learning experience.

This module explores a wide range of visual and literary texts, from gothic novels to Pre-Raphaelite paintings, which provide a sense of the extraordinary historical richness of the Victorian era.

In this module, we will study a series of major Victorian texts in detail, including a novel by Charles Dickens; some poetry by Tennyson and Browning; short stories by Robert Louis Stevenson, H G Wells and Mary Braddon; as well as art and architecture. We will place the literature and art in their historical, social, political and cultural contexts. The module is organized around the following significant themes, which galvanized the Victorians, as much as they concern us today:

  • the uses of the past
  • the condition of England
  • the woman question
  • commerce and the market
  • nationalism, imperialism, and global travel
  • urban life and the environment
  • science, medicine and the arts
  • the body

The sessions will be made up of lectures and seminar discussions, in which students are expected to participate. We will examine literary, visual and non-literary texts with issues of wider social, cultural, and historical context. In seminars we will read texts—whether literary, visual, historical, philosophical, or other—critically and in detail. We will also visit the Royal Albert Memorial Museum (RAMM) to explore Victorian objects, architecture and art, and to the Bill Douglas Cinema Museum to look at various forms of Victorian visual entertainment.

Session 2: 20 July - 10 August 2019

This module introduces you to the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme, implemented across England from 2008. The programme sought to address a significant problem in the provision of psychological therapies within England, but is a challenge experienced in many parts of the world. That is, limited access to ‘evidence-based psychological therapies’ for the treatment of ‘high-prevalence’ or ‘common’ mental health problems, often resulting in very long waiting times and difficulties concerning the acceptability of treatments being offered, or in meeting the needs of people with some feature of diversity.

The module is also designed to provide you with knowledge concerning the presentation of common mental health difficulties and equip you with a theoretical understanding of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT).  Further, the module provides you with a critical appreciation as to how the organisation of mental health service delivery, development of a new mental health workforce and implementation of low-intensity CBT is being used to address problems regarding the availability of evidence based psychological therapies and excessive waiting times.

To ensure equity of access for all groups in society there is also an emphasis throughout the module on several key principles surrounding diversity and adaptations to psychological therapy practice that may be required to ensure the specific needs and preferences of a range of patient groups are met, such as children and young adults.

Whilst addressing many of the theoretical issues surrounding the area of psychological therapies, diversity and evidence-based practice, the module is also rooted in clinical practice. This is enhanced by many of the teaching team being experienced psychological therapists and/or researchers in psychological therapies which informs the module assessment. In groups you are asked to develop a ‘patient’ information leaflet on mental health issues affecting an international student population.

Further, the module is enhanced with interactive activity based group learning sessions throughout.  These sessions help you apply the theoretical knowledge gained through lectures and seminars.  Through activity based learning, you also begin to gain an appreciation of some of the clinical skills used by low-intensity CBT practitioners, for example, low-intensity CBT assessment and motivational interviewing techniques.

For much of the 19th and 20th century Britain was the world’s superpower, and its imperial connections not only left deep traces in America, Africa and Asia, but also in Britain itself. Thus to understand modern British history it is necessary to see it in a global perspective: not only were British politics and economics influenced by imperial considerations, but also most of its wars were global conflicts.  Furthermore, British culture – food, fashion and architecture – was, and still is, shaped by its imperial legacy. By combining political, social and military history, this module introduces you to the key developments, ideas, events and people that shaped modern British history.

The module encourages you to explore the interdependency of national and global history in the last two hundred years through different scholarly methods and sources. You learn how global events, like the slave trade, the First World War or the conflict in the Middle East, are linked with British history. You also consider how life in Britain, for wealthy and ordinary people in London, Exeter or Bath, was influenced through global connections.

You will work with varied primary sources and with the rich collections of imperial artefacts at the University’s Cinema Museum and the Exeter Royal Albert Memorial Museum.  In this way you will not only study written texts, but you will also have the chance to work with the objects British travellers brought back from all over the world, and to see how Britain’s imperial past influenced its film industry.  As well as giving you a different perspective on academic history, this will encourage you to think about how museums present British history and the objects associated with it to the wider public.  

This module explores the economic, societal and environmental impacts and implications of climate change, as well as the technological solutions available; focusing on research currently being done by academics at the University of Exeter. The course begins with a general introduction to Climate Change and then examines three main topics in greater detail: Water Resources and Engineering, Renewable Energy, and Earth Systems. This is a technical program, coordinated by the College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, and is centred around the theory and application of climate change science. Although not a requisite, it is desirable to have a scientific background, and you can expect to come across technical terminology during this course

Specific topics related to Climate Change include:

 

  •  Causes and effects
  • Social, economic and political impacts
  • Environmental impacts and the threat to ecosystem services
  • Modelling and prediction
  • Adaptation and mitigation of catastrophic events
  • Management of water resources and rainfall changes
  • Renewable energy technologies and policies for a low carbon society
  • Climate Tipping Points

We will explore these issues within a multidisciplinary framework with lectures, workshops and practical exercises led by world-class researchers in engineering, physics, mathematics, biological, and environmental sciences.

This module aims to give you a broad vision and perspective on global climate change: its mechanisms and underlying science, a look at impacts upon society and the environment, and the technologies that can be employed to mitigate its effects, including adaptation strategies.

This course focuses on the growth and management of global enterprises from the emergence of the modern multinational to the present day. In studying the dynamics of international business we take these enterprises (commonly referred to as MNEs, MNCs or TNCs) as our key actors, and use an interdisciplinary approach to assess the challenges associated with developing strategies and managing operations across national boundaries. We explore, therefore, the interplay between the multinational enterprise, the countries in which it does business, and the competitive environment in which it operates. This approach will ensure that global enterprise is framed in a wide political, social, historical and economic context.

Throughout the course we consider firms from across the globe, and draw particular attention to the rise of large-scale enterprises from the BRIC economies (Brazil, Russia, India and China). We will also address the classic problems of modes of entry, global coordination, and local responsiveness. Public and political attitudes to “foreign” firms are also considered, and we challenge our sense of what constitutes ethical business practice. Students will be encouraged to reflect on cultural values, question their own assumptions and develop knowledge of other cultures through class discussions and group work. Employability skills are further developed through the giving of presentations, case-study analysis, team-working, and report-writing.

Overall the course aims to improve students’ knowledge of the modern multinational, and to foster systematic and informed analysis of how multinational enterprises operate, thrive, stagnate or fail in an integrated global economy.

This module will focus on the European Convention on Human Rights and its law, as interpreted by the European Court of Human Rights, and by the English courts through the (UK) Human Rights Act. This module aims to equip you with essential human rights law knowledge, and the key skills to understanding current developments in human rights
law. It will encourage you to follow the latest developments, and sharpen your critical thinking skills.

This module explores a wide range of visual and literary texts, from gothic novels to Pre-Raphaelite paintings, which provide a sense of the extraordinary historical richness of the Victorian era.

In this module, we will study a series of major Victorian texts in detail, including a novel by Charles Dickens; some poetry by Tennyson and Browning; short stories by Robert Louis Stevenson, H G Wells and Mary Braddon; as well as art and architecture. We will place the literature and art in their historical, social, political and cultural contexts. The module is organized around the following significant themes, which galvanized the Victorians, as much as they concern us today:

  • the uses of the past
  • the condition of England
  • the woman question
  • commerce and the market
  • nationalism, imperialism, and global travel
  • urban life and the environment
  • science, medicine and the arts
  • the body

The sessions will be made up of lectures and seminar discussions, in which students are expected to participate. We will examine literary, visual and non-literary texts with issues of wider social, cultural, and historical context. In seminars we will read texts—whether literary, visual, historical, philosophical, or other—critically and in detail. We will also visit the Royal Albert Memorial Museum (RAMM) to explore Victorian objects, architecture and art, and to the Bill Douglas Cinema Museum to look at various forms of Victorian visual entertainment.

Please Note: These courses are subject to change.

The balance of the open-mindedness and easy going attitudes of the professors made our learning fun and exciting. The professors had very smart perspectives and were very skilled in conveying important information.

Yanda Meidiena, Sebalas Maret University, Indonesia