News archive

April 2018

Work to highlight Perranporth’s mining history wins at the first Cornwall Heritage Awards

Work by archaeologists and historians to highlight Perranporth’s incredible mining history has been honoured at the first Cornwall Heritage Awards.

Student entrepreneurs cutting food miles and plastic waste with veg bag scheme

Student entrepreneurs are transforming the way their friends shop and eat – as well as helping to cut plastic waste and food miles – by growing and selling their own vegetables.

Exeter Northcott Theatre executive and artistic director Paul Jepson to step down when successor recruited

The revitalised Exeter Northcott Theatre is advertising for a permanent Artistic and Executive Director.

270 million visits made to English coastlines each year

Research has revealed for the first time that around 271 million recreational visits are made to marine and coastal environments in England.

Exeter and Geneva strengthen collaborative partnership

To celebrate, and further extend, the strong relationship of staff within the University of Exeter and the University of Geneva, the two universities are jointly launching a new seed fund to support developing research links.

Exeter experts sing praises of glorious mud

Mud provides precious habitats, a buffer against rising sea levels and a host of other benefits, according to two University of Exeter researchers.

The University of Exeter renews agreement with the University of South Florida (USF)

The University of Exeter and the University of South Florida (USF) renewed agreements for collaboration in Education and Research during recent meetings in Florida.

Inaugural Cornwall School Mining Games hailed a success

Cornish school children were given a fascinating insight into the county’s rich mining heritage when they took part in a recent special competition.

Experts team up to study bluefin tuna and confirm return to UK waters

Atlantic bluefin tuna are known for being amongst the biggest, fastest and most valuable fish in the sea.

Coral bleaching threatens the diversity of reef fish

New research shows that coral bleaching not only whitewashes corals, but can also reduce the variety of fish occupying these highly-valued ecosystems.

Exeter partners with Dementias Platform UK

The University of Exeter Medical School has been confirmed as a full partner of Dementias Platform UK (DPUK), a partnership of leading universities and prominent industry names striving for better research in dementia.

Geoengineering risks losers as well as winners for climate and wildfire risks

Artificially altering the climate system to limit global warming to 1.5C could increase the risks of wildfires in some areas, new research suggests.

Weight loss is an important predictor of cancer

Unintended weight loss is the second highest risk factor for some forms of cancer, concludes the first robust research analysis to examine the association.

Fish have ears, so man-made noise threatens their survival

An ‘acoustic fog’ from motorboat noise, underwater construction and other man-made marine sounds can threaten the survival of fish.

Gene that Makes Humans Eat More Sugar Can Also Lower Body Fat

Scientists have known since 2013 that a version of the gene FGF21 makes us consume more carbohydrates.

Conflict in outer space will happen: legal experts

Space and military law experts from Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States have joined forces to take the lead on understanding how our Earth-bound laws will be applied in times of armed conflict in outer space.

Droughts mean fewer flowers for bees

Bees could be at risk from climate change because more frequent droughts could cause plants to produce fewer flowers, new research shows.

Fossil study sheds light on ancient butterfly wing colours

Pioneering new research has given an illuminating new insight into the metallic, iridescent colours found on the earliest known ancestors of moths and butterflies, which habited the earth almost 200 million years ago.

Britain’s security experts want increased defence spending, new survey shows

Britain’s future military commanders and staff officers want the Government to increase defence spending, new research shows.

Viruses can evolve in parallel in related species

Viruses are more likely to evolve in similar ways in related species – raising the risk that they will “jump” from one species to another, new research shows.

Crowded urban areas have fewer songbirds per person

People in crowded urban areas – especially poor areas – see fewer songbirds such as tits and finches, and more potential “nuisance” birds, such as pigeons, magpies and gulls, new research shows.

Exeter professor honoured by Chinese university

A leading Exeter academic has been appointed as Honorary Professor at Tianjin University in China.

Job hunters drop ties with supportive colleagues

People considering quitting their jobs stop supporting current colleagues because they no longer feel they need to do favours for them, research shows.

£10M donation for Mireille Gillings Neuroimaging Centre, medical research and leadership programmes

Gift from the Dennis and Mireille Gillings Foundation is the single largest received by the University of Exeter.

Exeter University launches trail-blazing maternity scheme: six months leave on full pay from first day at work

New mums at the University of Exeter will be entitled to six months maternity leave on full pay from the day they start work in one of the most generous parental leave packages in the public sector.

Wartime hospital past of Exeter landmark building commemorated

The First World War hospital past of one of Exeter’s landmark buildings and the contribution of doctors and nurses who worked there will be commemorated.

Exeter Scoops Prestigious National Award from the Career Development Institute

A student training programme has won the Innovative and Impactful Employer Engagement Activity award at CDI’s prestigious UK career awards.

£1m toolkit to calculate economic value of urban greenspace

£1m is being invested in an online toolkit designed to empower cities and developers to accurately assess the multiple benefits of green infrastructure, so as to make informed policy and business decisions. 

Hungry birds as climate change drives food ‘mismatch’

Warmer springs create a “mismatch” where hungry chicks hatch too late to feast on abundant caterpillars, new research shows.

Multiple sclerosis may be linked to sheep disease toxin

Exposure to a toxin primarily found in sheep could be linked to the development of multiple sclerosis (MS) in humans, new research suggests.

Pub-goers invited to raise a pint to science in Exeter

Experts from the University of Exeter will bring their research out of the laboratory and into city watering holes, as the world’s largest festival of public science talks arrive in Exeter.

Scientists create innovative new ‘green’ concrete using graphene

A new greener, stronger and more durable concrete that is made using the wonder-material graphene could revolutionise the construction industry.

Exeter social scientists honoured by Academy

Three leading social scientists from the University of Exeter have been bestowed with a prestigious Fellowship from the Academy of Social Sciences.

Commonly prescribed heartburn drug linked to Pneumonia in Older Adults

Researchers at the University of Exeter have found a statistical link between pneumonia in older people and a group of medicines commonly used to neutralise stomach acid in people with heartburn or stomach ulcers.

Research gives new ray of hope for solar fuel

The quest to develop the ‘Holy Grail’ of affordable, viable and environmentally-friendly fuels using sunlight has taken an exciting new twist.

Targeted global higher education collaborations more necessary than ever: university leaders

Targeted global higher education collaborations are more necessary than ever as student populations and sources of funding change, the leaders of two world-leading universities have said.

Exeter student to join team kayaking length of Wales collecting plastic

A second year marine biology student, is to join a team of women kayaking the length of Wales collecting plastic.

Birds flock to Exeter campuses

The number of birds coming to University of Exeter campuses has substantially risen compared to previous years according to a new independent breeding birds survey.

Guardian award for policy-changing research on microplastic pollution

Research that revealed the devastating impact that microplastic pollution could have on the health of humans and wildlife has won a Guardian University Award.

Exeter subjects amongst very best in The Complete University Guide

Both science and humanities subjects at the University of Exeter have been recognised as being amongst the very best nationally in the latest influential league table.

Stunning virtual tour of exoplanets takes its one millionth ‘passenger’.

One million budding astronomers and space enthusiasts have taken a magical tour to explore the exotic worlds orbiting distant stars, through a stunning virtual reality documentary.

“Blue light” of LED streetlights linked to breast and prostate cancer

The “blue light” emitted by street lights including LEDs, and commercial outdoor lighting such as advertising, is linked to a significant increase in the risk of breast and prostate cancer, innovative new research has concluded.

Hear from leading Bitcoin developers at University of Exeter event

One of the earliest developers of Bitcoin will explain how the digital currency works and its potential to transform world trade at a University of Exeter event.

Cornwall’s young achievers win at Excellence Awards

The achievements of young people in Cornwall have been celebrated through the University of Exeter’s Excellence Awards.

£250,000 funding boost to investigate whether vitamin D promotes brain health

A robust clinical trial to investigate whether taking vitamin D can help keep our brains sharp in older age has been supported by a donation of nearly £250,000 from the J P Moulton Charitable Foundation. 

Deteriorating Great Barrier Reef hushed: young fish no longer hear their way home

Degraded coral reefs are far quieter than five years ago, and no longer sound like a suitable habitat to young fish searching for a place to live and breed, according to research published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA.

Discovery of immune cells able to defend against mutating viruses could transform vaccine development

Scientists have found immune cells can fight different strains of the same virus – a discovery which could help transform vaccine development.