News archive

December 2018

Autumn telethon raises more than £135,000

The University of Exeter’s autumn telethon has raised more than £135,000 to support students as part of the Making the Exceptional Happen Campaign.

Exeter student awarded Undergraduate Achievement Grant

A University of Exeter student has been awarded an Undergraduate Achievement Grant for her commitment to engineering.

Christmas dinner a ‘global feast’

Christmas dinner is an international evolutionary feast – with only the humble carrot native to British soil, a leading scientist says.

Graphene unlocks new potential for ‘smart textiles’

The quest to create affordable, durable and mass-produced ‘smart textiles’ has been given fresh impetus through the use of the wonder material Graphene.

Scientists secure prestigious awards for global impact of microplastics research

A team of researchers has won two prestigious awards for the impact of work highlighting the presence, and potential impacts, of microplastics in our oceans.

Innovative technology centre opening at Oceansgate development

A new centre for marine innovation, based at Plymouth’s Oceansgate development, is now up-and-running thanks to European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) funding.

Scheme to improve wellbeing of parent carers to start trials

A support programme to help parents of disabled children stay healthy in mind and body will begin its first trial in the coming months, and is looking for participants.

Microplastics found in all sea turtle species

Tests on more than 100 sea turtles – spanning three oceans and all seven species – have revealed microplastics in the guts of every single turtle.

Turning climate change from a ‘tragedy of the commons’ to positive action

Climate change must no longer be viewed as a “tragedy of the commons”, researchers say.

Helium exoplanet inflated like a balloon, research shows

Astronomers have discovered a distant planet with an abundance of helium in its atmosphere, which has swollen to resemble an inflated balloon.

‘Hangxiety’ higher in shy people

Very shy people are more likely to suffer “hangxiety” – anxiety during a hangover – than their extrovert friends, new research shows.

Exeter Recognised in UK’s Top Breakthroughs List for Revolutionary Hip Replacement

The Exeter Hip has been listed as one of the UK’s 100 best breakthroughs for its life-changing impact on nearly two million lives across half a century.

Rudolph ‘not bullied for red nose’

Rudolph the reindeer probably wasn’t bullied for his crimson snout – because he and his fellow reindeer can’t see red.

A win for Build Solar at the Cornwall Sustainability Awards

Build Solar, an innovative spin-out company from the University of Exeter, lead the way at the Cornwall Sustainability Awards with a win in the "Innovation - Tomorrow's Contribution to Sustainability" category for their impressive new product Solar Squared, a multifunctional glass brick.

Hong Kong’s waters benefit health and wellbeing

A ground-breaking study has revealed how spending time in and around Hong Kong’s ‘blue spaces’ (harbours, coastlines and beaches) is linked to better health and wellbeing, especially for older adults.

Human antibody discovery could save lives from fungal killer

A new way to diagnose, treat and protect against stealth fungal infections that claim more than 1.5 million lives per year worldwide has been moved a step closer, according to research published in Nature Communications.

Dartmoor National Park prepares for population rise

Dartmoor National Park Authority has released details of a new study, undertaken with academics from the University of Exeter, looking into the possible affects and opportunities of a growing local population in surrounding areas on the special qualities of the National Park.

Exeter research ranked among the most influential of 2018

Research conducted by Exeter experts has been recognised amongst the top 100 influential in 2018.

What if global warming passes 1.5°C?

What will happen if humanity fails to limit global warming to 1.5°C?

First women parliamentary candidates utilised their gender to win votes, records show

Britain’s first female parliamentary candidates utilised their gender as a campaigning tool to win votes and championed new policies such as equal citizenship, analysis of records show.

Drones help map sea level rise

Drones can be used to create low-cost and accurate 3D maps of coastal areas, new research shows.

Low skilled, low paid workers of the world don't unite, research shows

Workers in low-skilled, low paid employment aren’t prone to band together and form a common bond, new research has shown.

UN genocide prevention expert honoured at University of Exeter winter graduation

A campaigner leading the UN’s international efforts to fight genocide is among the experts being honoured at the University of Exeter’s winter graduation ceremonies this week.

Crucial environmental research receives major funding boost

Pioneering new research on major environmental issues, led by scientists from the University of Exeter, have received a major funding boost, it has been announced.

First international academic “Santa survey” shows children stop believing in Father Christmas aged eight

It’s that time of year when children look forward to a stocking full of presents - but the first international academic “Santa survey” shows many adults also wish they still believed in Father Christmas and some had felt betrayed when they discovered the truth.

Warning over deep-sea ‘gold rush’

A “gold rush” of seabed mining could lead to unprecedented damage to fragile deep-sea ecosystems, researchers have warned.

£1 million circular economy research hub at the University of Exeter to re-think plastics production and use

The University of Exeter has been awarded £1 million to create a new centre to tackle the use of plastic and plastic waste.

Research sheds new light on what drove last, long-term global climate shift

The quest to discover what drove the last, long-term global climate shift on Earth, which took place around a million years ago, has taken a new, revealing twist.

Mother and daughter both graduate together - for the second time

A mother and daughter are celebrating graduating together from the same university – for the second time.

Newly discovered adolescent star seen undergoing ‘growth spurt’

Astronomers have discovered a young star undergoing a rare growth spurt – giving a fascinating glimpse into the development of these distant stellar objects.

Popular children more likely to give less to pals at Christmas

Popular children are likely to be less generous towards their friends at Christmas than other kids, but only if their giving takes place in private and their classmates won’t be told.

Teachers should teach Muslim, feminist and other views of Jesus this Christmas

Lessons about Jesus should include exploration of how Muslims view him as a prophet and investigation of his Jewish identity, experts have said.

Historians and computer scientists unite for £9.2m project which will revolutionise research

Historians and computer scientists are set to collaborate to analyse millions of pages of documents as part of a major new research project which will shed new light on the impact of mechanisation on the lives of ordinary people.

Convincing evidence that type 2 diabetes is a cause of erectile dysfunction

Evidence that type 2 diabetes is a cause of erectile dysfunction has been found in a largescale genomic analysis.

Higher radiation dose needed to X-ray obese patients increases cancer risk

Extremely obese people are needing a far higher dose of radiation during x-ray examinations than people of normal weight, increasing their risk of cancer, new research has shown.

Warming warning over turtle feminisation

Up to 93% of green turtle hatchlings could be female by 2100, as climate change causes “feminisation” of the species, new research suggests.

Lifeboat engineering and science enthrals at festive family event hosted at the University of Exeter

Families from across the South West were immersed in fun, facts and physics about lifeboats and the incredible work carried out by the men and women of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) during a special festive treat, organised jointly by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) and the University of Exeter.

Experts tackle Mars settlement problems

Ugly interior design, interplanetary “jetlag” and personality clashes are among the problems hampering humanity’s efforts to settle on Mars, experts say.

Tudor England shunned ‘festive fatigue’ for three-month Christmas celebrations

Those who are beginning to suffer from ‘festive fatigue’ may want to spare a thought for those who lived in the Tudor times – when Christmas celebrations ran for three months.

Pollutants from wild fires affect crop and vegetation growth hundreds of kilometres from impact zone, research shows

The startling extent to which violent wild fires, similar to those that ravaged large swathes of California recently, affect forests and crops way beyond the boundaries of the blaze has been revealed.

Research highlights what helps people live well with dementia

New research has identified the factors that enable people with dementia and their carers to live as well as possible.

College hosts its 5th annual Christmas Lectures

On 19th December 2018 the College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences hosted their 5th annual Christmas Lectures, arranged by Professor Pete Vukusic, Dr Gihan Marasingha, Dr Alice Mills and Vicky Glazer. 

CBE for cancer diagnosis professor whose deafness “boosted research career”

Professor Willie Hamilton, whose research in improving cancer diagnosis has helped save thousands of lives, has been awarded the CBE.