Research News

Cognitive impairment research project to help improve lives by increasing contact with nature

New research project ENLIVEN will help older people living with cognitive impairment – including dementia – to be more active and independent and experience a better quality of life through increasing their contact with the natural environment.

Everyday sexism at petrol forecourt inspires new children’s book, published on International Women’s Day

A sexist encounter at a petrol station has inspired a new children’s book designed to encourage children to follow their dreams and challenge outdated gender expectations.

Being highly educated not a curb to bigger families for religious women, study suggests

The trend for highly-educated women to have fewer children isn’t seen among those who are religious, new analysis suggests.

New research reveals story of Penguin’s work to bring Russian classics to English readers in the 20th century

New research reveals for the first time the personal efforts and innovations behind major efforts in the 20th century to publish classic Russian literature in accessible and affordable English translations.

Couples who married in alternative wedding ceremonies needed to help with new research project

Couples who chose to marry in an alternative wedding ceremony can take part in a major new research project which will shed light on the demand for non-legal marriage services in England and Wales.

Female gannets go the extra mile to feed chicks

Female gannets travel further than male gannets to find fish for their chicks in some years but not others, new research shows.

First English translation of secret novel about hidden sexuality by one of Spain’s most-loved authors

A secret autobiographical novel by one of Spain’s most-loved authors inspired by her hidden sexuality has been translated into English for the first time.

Tenfold increase in CO2 emissions cuts needed to stem climate emergency

New research shows 64 countries cut their fossil CO2 emissions during 2016-2019, but the rate of reduction needs to increase tenfold to meet the Paris Agreement aims to tackle climate change.

Rarest seal breeding site discovered

Scientists have discovered a previously unknown breeding site used by the world's rarest seal species.

Exeter Professor selected for EPSRC’s Strategic Advisory Network

One of the University of Exeter’s foremost experts in using Mathematics in Biomedicine and Healthcare has been selected to join a prestigious national advisory group.

Database of miscarriages of justice launched as part of new evidence-based justice initiative

A database showing miscarriages of justice that have occurred over the past 50 years has been launched as part of a new initiative aimed at using evidence from psychology and data science to improve the legal system.

Transmission risk of COVID-19 from sewage spills into rivers can now be quickly quantified

Scientists have identified that the COVID-19 virus could be transmitted through faecal contaminated river water.

Global warming poses threat to food chains

Rising temperatures could reduce the efficiency of food chains and threaten the survival of larger animals, new research shows.

“Stark warning”: Combating ecosystem collapse from the tropics to the Antarctic

Eminent scientists warn that key ecosystems around Australia and Antarctica are collapsing, and propose a three-step framework to combat irreversible global damage

A. G. Leventis Foundation funds new Chair in Classics and Ancient History at the University of Exeter

Classics teaching and research at the University of Exeter will benefit for years to come, thanks to additional support from the A. G. Leventis Foundation.

Visiting water bodies worth £700bn to economies, study finds

Europeans spend more than £700 billion (€800bn) a year on recreational visits to water bodies – but perceived poor water quality costs almost £90 billion (€100bn) in lost visits, a new study has found

Chimpanzees and humans share overlapping territories

Chimpanzees and humans "overlap" in their use of forests and even villages, new research shows.

A-maze-ing pheasants have two ways of navigating

Pheasants fall into two groups in terms of how they find their way around – and the different types prefer slightly different habitats, new research shows.

Research shows how single celled algae rotate as they swim towards the light

Scientists have made a pivotal breakthrough in the quest to understand how single-cell green algae are able to keep track of the light as they swim.

Changes in writing style provide clues to group identity

Small changes to people's writing style can reveal which social group they "belong to" at a given moment, new research shows.

Using human rights laws may be most effective way of harnessing international legislation to protect the Amazon, study shows

Using laws governing human rights may be the best way of harnessing international legislation and tribunals to protect the Amazon, a new study shows.

Far-right political parties are ambivalent rather than sceptical about Europe, analysis shows

Far right political parties have acted in an ambivalent rather than overtly sceptical way towards Europe, analysis shows.

How rehabilitation could help people with COVID-19 recover – evidence reviewed

Progressive exercise and early mobilisation are among the elements of rehabilitation programmes that may improve recovery for people who are hospitalised with severe COVID-19

New drug molecules hold promise for treating fatal child disease

Scientists have identified a way to “rescue” muscle cells that have genetically mutated, paving the way to a possible new treatment for rare childhood illness such as Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD)

Experts offer roadmap for Biden administration to calculate social cost of carbon in new analysis

The Biden administration should reinstate the estimated economic cost of CO2 emitted to $50 a ton, a group of leading researchers has said.

Helping people with Parkinson’s and freezing of gait take the first step: VSimulators technology supporting novel, low-cost community interventions

Research aiming to train people with Parkinson’s to shift their balance and overcome ‘freezing of gait’ (a feeling that one’s feet are stuck to the floor), has received funding from Parkinson’s UK.

Major new history of the novel in French shows its impact from the medieval period to current day

A major new study shows the development and impact of the novel in French from the pre-history of the art form in the late medieval period to the present day.

Survey finds beavers establishing strong presence in City of Perth

Beavers in Scotland are establishing a strong presence in Perth, according to researchers conducting the most comprehensive ever survey of the animal in Scotland.    

Farmer mental health hit during Covid focus of new research

Farmers mental health and resilience and the effect of the Covid-19 pandemic will be the focus of a major new research project.

Tropical paper wasps babysit for neighbours

Wasps provide crucial support to their extended families by babysitting at neighbouring nests, according to new research by a team of biologists from the universities of Bristol, Exeter and UCL published today [15 February] in Nature Ecology and Evolution.

£4 million Deep Digital Cornwall project launched to unlock underground environment

The underground environment is the subject of a major new £4 million project launched to create a world-leading cluster of research-intensive digital businesses in Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly.

Beardless dandies of the 18th century actually had heavy stubble, study shows

The 18th century gentlemen may often be viewed as perfectly groomed and bewigged, but in reality he only shaved once or twice a week, and probably often had heavy stubble, new research shows.

Large-scale study finds genetic testing technology falsely detects very rare variants

A technology that is widely used by commercial genetic testing companies is “extremely unreliable” in detecting very rare variants

New research identifies biological causes of muscle weakness in later life

A new largescale genetic analysis has found biological mechanisms that contribute to making people more susceptible to muscle weakness in later life, finding that diseases such as osteoarthritis and diabetes may play a large role in susceptibility

Tocilizumab reduces deaths in patients hospitalised with COVID-19

An anti-inflammatory treatment routinely used to treat Rheumatoid Arthritis has been found to reduce death risk in hospitalised patients with COVID-19

Play and meaty food reduce hunting by cats

Domestic cats hunt wildlife less if owners play with them daily and feed them a meat-rich food, new research shows.

Common pipistrelle bats attracted to wind turbines

One of the most abundant bats in Europe may be attracted to wind turbines, a new study shows.

Family ties explain mysterious social life of coral gobies

The strange social structure of tiny fish called emerald coral gobies may be explained by family loyalty, new research shows.

Methods of recording, investigating and learning from deaths following use of force by the police across Europe can be critically lacking, new report warns

Methods of recording, investigating and learning from deaths following use of force by the police across Europe can be “lacking in critical respects”, a new report warns.

‘Thinking style’ dictates how we use social media and our engagement with fake news, study finds

Our thinking style can have a huge impact on the way we use social media, including on whether we engage with ‘fake news’, a new study has shown.

Ancient Amazonian farmers fortified valuable land they had spent years making fertile to protect it from conflict

Ancient Amazonian communities fortified valuable land they had spent years making fertile to protect it from conflict, excavations show.

Study proves strong link between political bias and social tie formation on Twitter

Twitter users are three times more likely to follow back the accounts of strangers if they share the same political views, according to a new study that sheds light on the phenomenon of ‘echo chambers’ on social media.

University of Exeter partnership develops novel algorithms with the power to transform the use of quantum computers

Dr Oleksandr Kyriienko, lead of the University of Exeter’s Quantum Dynamics, Optics, and Simulation group (QuDOS) is working in close partnership with Dutch start-up Qu & Co to develop quantum software with the potential to transform the way we use the huge power of quantum computers in industry.

People would prefer to vote online than by post in UK 2021 elections during pandemic, research shows

More people would prefer to vote online than by post during the bumper set of covid-disrupted local, mayoral and national elections this year, research shows.

Higher excess COVID-19 death risk in middle-aged people with type 2 diabetes raises vaccine prioritisation questions

A largescale analysis led by the University of Exeter has found a disproportionately higher COVID-19 death risk in middle-aged people with type 2 diabetes

Birds living in natural habits can help inform captive care

Bird species that live in their natural habitats can help zoos learn how to manage those in captivity, according to a new review.

New research studies “domino effects” and synchrony in brain activity

Scientists have made a significant breakthrough in the quest to understand the intricate processes that occur in the brain during seizures that are the key symptom of epilepsy.

Health and wellbeing benefits of walking on the South West Coast Path valued at over £75 million per year

Latest research has calculated health and wellbeing benefits of over £75 million for people walking Britain’s longest National Trail. 

Healthy oceans need healthy soundscapes

Oceans were once filled with the sounds of nature, but overfishing, climate change and human noise have fundamentally changed the natural underwater "soundtrack", researchers say.

$1.2 million to find new treatment for rare cancer

A new grant of $1.2 million (£880,000) from The Neuroendocrine Tumor Research Foundation (NETRF) is funding a collaboration involving the University of Exeter to find the cause of a rare form of cancer, and unlock new treatment pathways

DIGIT Lab announced to help businesses close ‘digital transformation gap’

Large organisations will be helped to adapt to the digital transformation of society as part of a new research initiative, led by the University of Exeter Business School.

Dementia rates higher in men with common genetic disorder haemochromatosis

New research has found that men who have the Western world’s most common genetic disorder are more likely to develop dementia, compared to those without the faulty genes

Social distancing over 50% more likely among highest earners, study finds

The highest earners in the US are much more likely to engage in social distancing, mask wearing, hand-washing and other protective measures against COVID-19, a new study has found.

2021 assessment changes mean teachers need “extensive support” to avoid unconscious bias, experts urge

The cancellation of 2021 exams mean teachers need “extensive guidance” on how to minimise the threat of unconscious bias while assessing pupils’ work, experts have said.

Improved model estimates impact of ozone on soy crops

The impact of ozone on soybean production can be predicted more accurately thanks to improvements to a computer modelling system.

New study investigates photonics for artificial intelligence and neuromorphic computing

Scientists have given a fascinating new insight into the next steps to develop fast, energy-efficient, future computing systems that use light instead of electrons to process and store information.

LGBTQIA communities to help create new Exeter play showing history of loneliness and exclusion

A new play co-created by people living in the South West – due to be performed in Exeter – will show the long history of LGBTQIA loneliness and marginalisation.

Celebrities join Business School professor in virtual call to address Arctic change during ‘digital Davos’

Adventurer Bear Grylls, musician Billie Eilish and the actors Robert Downey Jr and Rainn Wilson will be among the famous faces demanding climate action at the Davos Agenda’s Environment Day, taking place tomorrow (27 January).

Pioneering research unravels hidden origins of Eastern Asia’s ‘land of milk and honey’

A study has revealed for the first time the ancient origins of one of the world’s most important ecosystems.

Ocean sharks and rays threatened with extinction

Three quarters of ocean shark and ray species face an elevated risk of extinction, according to new research.

ISIS and the Taliban use different strategies to appeal to women in English-language magazines, study shows

ISIS, Al Qaeda, and the Taliban use their English-language magazines to encourage women to support jihad in different ways, according to new research.

New nature experiment launched with BBC Music

A new experiment goes live today, investigating how people respond to different kinds of digital nature experience

New study will show how efforts to tackle coronavirus can inadvertently cause shame and stigma

Experts have begun a major new study to understand how public health efforts to tackle coronavirus can inadvertently cause shame and discrimination.

Preventing loneliness among children of depressed mothers may help prevent adolescent suicidality

Children of mothers experiencing depressive symptoms are more at risk, as adolescents, of experiencing suicidal thoughts and attempting suicide.

The Glorious Revolution inspired birth of modern satire long before coffee shop culture, according to new research

The arrival of William of Orange in England helped to inspire the birth of modern satire – long before coffee shop culture made the cutting art form fashionable, a new study argues.

“Attitude of gratitude” keeps older people in Japan feeling hopeful as they age, study shows

Older people in Japan have an “attitude of gratitude” which keeps them feeling hopeful despite the challenges of aging, a new study says.

Pioneering new technique could revolutionise super-resolution imaging systems

Scientists have developed a pioneering new technique that could revolutionise the accuracy, precision and clarity of super-resolution imaging systems.

Covid lockdown loneliness linked to more depressive symptoms in older adults

Loneliness in adults aged 50 and over during the COVID-19 lockdown was linked to worsening depressive and other mental health symptoms, according to a large-scale online study.

Exeter research receives global recognition

Research conducted by University of Exeter experts has been recognised among the most shared and discussed of 2020.

Study pinpoints difficulties and tensions in creating ‘thought leadership’

A new study examines the risks and tensions in producing ‘thought leadership’, a concept that sees individual gurus and organisations share their expertise to intrigue, challenge and push the boundaries of knowledge – and enhance their reputations.

National circular economy hub to lead the way in UK bid to create a sustainable future

A new research hub led by the University of Exeter will spearhead national efforts to create a sustainable, circular economy where fewer resources are used and more waste materials reused – delivering huge benefits to the environment and UK economy.

Breakthrough in understanding 'tummy bug' bacteria

Scientists have discovered how bacteria commonly responsible for seafood-related stomach upsets can go dormant and then "wake up".

Motion sensitivity research could benefit people with inner ear condition

Research into motion sensitivity could lead to improved rehabilitation programmes and an improvement in building designs for people with a rare inner ear condition that affects their balance

Genital shape key to male flies' sexual success

Having genitals of a certain shape and size gives male flies a major reproductive advantage, new research shows.

Guppies have varying levels of self-control

Just like humans trying to stick to New Year's resolutions, guppies have varying levels of self-control, a new study shows.

Changing resilience of oceans to climate change

Oxygen levels in the ancient oceans were surprisingly resilient to climate change, new research suggests.

Simple, cheap test can help save lives from colorectal cancer

New research has demonstrated that a simple, cheap test can help identify who is at risk of developing colorectal cancer, aiding early diagnosis and potentially saving lives

COVID-19: Mortality risk increases by 20 per cent when ICUs are full

Patients admitted to very full hospitals have an increased chance of dying which is equivalent to being up to 11 years older

Ancient DNA reveals secrets of Game of Thrones wolves

An extinct species of wolf made famous in the TV show Game of Thrones split off from others nearly six million years ago and are only a distant relative of today’s wolves, researchers have found.

‘Fake News Law’ needed to protect the public against the spread of fake news, experts argue

There is an urgent need to regulate fake news, and even criminalising the deliberate creation and spread of false information should not be ruled out, legal experts have warned.

Discovery of thousands of pieces of fabric gives historians a rare glimpse into fashions of the past

The discovery of thousands of pieces of 18th century fabric has given historians a rare glimpse into fashion hundreds of years ago. 

Grey camouflage 'better than zebra stripes'

Dull, featureless camouflage provides better protection from predators than zebra stripes, according to a new study.

Rotten Egg Gas Could Guard Against Alzheimer’s Disease

Typically characterised as poisonous, corrosive and smelling of rotten eggs, hydrogen sulfide’s reputation may soon get a facelift

Take 15 minutes to complete the Big Farming Survey

RABI has launched the largest ever survey of farming people in England and Wales, with a target of achieving 26,000 responses. 

BAME parliamentary candidates not picked to fight ‘winnable seats’ in areas with less tolerance towards diversity, study suggests

Political parties are increasingly likely to avoid selecting ethnic minority candidates for ‘winnable’ constituencies at General Elections in areas where there are less tolerant attitudes toward diversity, study suggests.

BCG vaccine trial extends across Devon, in partnership with RD&E

A large global trial designed to test the theory that the widely used BCG vaccine might help protect against COVID-19 amongst healthcare staff and care home workers is expanding.

Positive ‘tipping points’ offer hope for climate

Positive “tipping points” could spark cascading changes that accelerate action on climate change, experts say.

University of Exeter KTP plays key role in the manufacturing process of the new Covid-19 vaccine

A Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP) between the University of Exeter and Smart Manufacturing LTD is playing a direct and key role in the production process of the new COVID-19 vacccine.

Ongoing sudden stratospheric warming could increase risk of snow over coming weeks

A pioneering new study helps shed light on the chances of extreme cold, and potentially snow in the UK in the next fortnight.

Poorer pupils most likely to be away from school at the end of 2020, researchers tracking coronavirus learning loss have found

Poorer pupils were most likely to be away from school at the end of 2020, experts analysing the learning loss caused by coronavirus have found.

Speeding up machine learning by means of light

Scientists have developed a pioneering new approach that will rapidly speed up machine learning – using light.

New research sheds light on early mechanisms driving diatom bloom formation

Scientists have discovered how diatoms (a globally important group of eukaryotic algae) sense the availability of phosphorus, a vital macronutrient that controls diatom growth and productivity in the oceans.

Big bumblebees learn locations of best flowers

Big bumblebees take time to learn the locations of the best flowers, new research shows.

People back coronavirus restrictions but think autumn local lockdowns were mismanaged by the Government, survey shows

There is widespread public support for coronavirus restrictions, but most people believe local lockdowns this autumn were mismanaged by the Government, a new survey shows.

Discovery of 66 new Roman Army sites shows more clues about some of the empire’s most infamous conflicts

The discovery of dozens of new Roman Army sites thanks to remote sensing technology has revealed more about one of the empire’s most infamous battles.

 

Doctors should change the way that they ask patients about self-harm and suicide, study recommends

Doctors can better help patients with mental health concerns by adopting a different questioning style around self-harm and suicide, experts have said.

Major changes to interpretation of the Human Rights Act needed to protect people during arrest and detention, research argues

Major changes to the way courts interpret the Human Rights Act are necessary so the legislation does more to protect people detained because of the expansion of police powers, a new study says.

Ivory Coast creates first Marine Protected Area

Ivory Coast has announced the creation of its first Marine Protected Area (MPA).

Difference in blood pressure between arms linked to greater death risk

A difference in blood pressure readings between arms is linked to greater risk of heart attack, stroke and death.

Legal reforms needed to protect people from “deepfake” and AI intellectual property theft, expert warns

Legal reforms are needed to protect people from their image being copied by “deepfake” or AI technology, an expert has warned.

New drug molecules hold promise for treating rare inherited terminal childhood disease

Scientists at the University of Exeter have identified a way to “rescue” cells that have genetically mutated

Major new research project to help pupils promote peace and make sense of the violent past

Experts have begun a major new research project to help pupils around the world to use history and heritage to promote peace and make sense of past violence. 

Crops near Chernobyl still contaminated

Crops grown near Chernobyl are still contaminated due to the 1986 nuclear accident, new research shows.

Squirrels need good neighbours

Living beside familiar neighbours boosts a squirrel's chances of survival and successful breeding, new research shows.

Shark fishing bans partially effective

Bans on shark fishing are only partially effective in protecting sharks, new research suggests.

‘EU’s sustainable finance rules undermine climate goal,’ claim experts

The European Commission’s planned new rules on sustainable finance could undermine the bloc’s climate change goals, according to an open letter signed by Professor Chendi Zhang, Director of the Business School’s new Exeter Sustainable Finance Centre.

Physicists solve geometrical puzzle in electromagnetism

A team of scientists have solved the longstanding problem of how electrons move together as a group inside cylindrical nanoparticles.

Joint Centre of Excellence in Environmental Intelligence hosts inaugural event

The key challenges, priorities and solutions to some of the world’s most pressing environmental issues will be showcased at a special event this week.

Babbler bird falls into climate change trap

Animals can fall into an "ecological trap" by altering their behaviour in the “wrong direction” in response to climate change, researchers say.

Research dispels fears human stem cells contain cancer-causing mutations

Pioneering new research has made a pivotal breakthrough that dispel concerns that human stem cells could contain cancer-causing mutations.

COVID lockdown causes record drop in CO2 emissions for 2020

The global COVID-19 lockdowns caused fossil carbon dioxide emissions to decline by an estimated 2.4 billion tonnes in 2020 – a record drop according to researchers at the University of East Anglia (UEA), University of Exeter and the Global Carbon Project.

Research sheds new light on cause of deadly lung disease

New research could shed light on the mystery cause of a lung disease that is a major killer, and potentially unlock new treatments

£300,000 from NIHR to investigate the views of older adults on strategies to improve recovery from planned surgery

A team of researchers from across the University of Exeter Medical School, has secured £300,000 in funding to continue their work into the impact of strategies to improve the recovery of older adults undergoing planned surgery.

Leading researchers receive prestigious ERC funding awards

Two of the University of Exeter’s most respected researchers have received a significant funding boost from the European Research Council (ERC), it has been announced.

Funding awarded to help more people in Wales tackle rising cases of domestic abuse

Delivery drivers, neighbours and colleagues in virtual meetings could help tackle rising domestic abuse with the right training and support in a world changed by COVID-19.

Research develops new theoretical approach to manipulate light

The quest to discover pioneering new ways in which to manipulate how light travels through electromagnetic materials has taken a new, unusual twist.

Peatland preservation vital to climate

Preserving the world's peatlands – and the vast carbon stores they contain – is vital to limiting climate change, researchers say.

Mapping global impacts for all vegetable oils key to sustainability

A lack of data on the environmental and social impacts of vegetable oil crops stands in the way of informed discussions about their relative sustainability, according to a new study by members of the IUCN’s Palm Oil Task Force.

Experts, politicians, charity leaders and activists join forces to discuss impact of religion and culture on the lives of people with disabilities in Namibia

Experts, politicians, charity leaders and activists met to discuss the impact of religion and culture on the lives of people with disabilities in Namibia.

University of Exeter historian’s work on epidemics honoured by the AHRC Medical Humanities Awards

Pioneering research by a University of Exeter historian on the impact and management of epidemics has been honoured at this year’s AHRC Medical Humanities Awards.

Newly discovered ancient villages laid out like a clock face are further proof of human impact on the Amazon

Ancient Amazonian villages laid out like a clock face have been discovered by experts, thanks to technology that allows them to see below the rainforest canopy.

Impact of social isolation on the brain... of fish

Have you recently wondered how social-distancing and self-isolation may be affecting your brain?

Scientists predict 'optimal' stress levels

Scientists have created an evolutionary model to predict how animals should react in stressful situations.

Digital health passports should not be rolled out on a mass basis until COVID-19 vaccines are available to all, report warns

Digital health passports should not be introduced on a mass basis until coronavirus tests are available and affordable to everyone in the country, report warns

'Message in a bottle' tracks plastic pollution

Electronic tags released in the Ganges river show plastic pollution can travel thousands of kilometres in just a few months.

Why soft skills could power the rise of robot leaders

What would the world look like if socially-skilled robots stepped into the roles normally reserved for humans?

Incredible history of one of England’s last pierrot troupes on display for the first time

For decades they were one of the country’s last remaining pierrot troupes, bringing joy to people of all ages at seaside resorts with their singing, dancing and games. 

Birds able to adjust egg-laying date

Many birds are able to change their egg-laying date to cope with variable conditions, new research shows.

The distress caused by the Coronavirus pandemic means parents should maintain the “vital tonic” of the Father Christmas myth for children this year, psychologist urges

Parents agonise about how to handle difficult questions about Father Christmas when children grow up, but the coronavirus pandemic means it could be damaging to be totally honest this year.

Small and large birth weight linked to genetics of mother and baby – except in tiniest babies

Genetics of mother and baby contribute to most cases where babies are born very large or very small, according to new research

Exeter Diabetes Professor wins Belgian’s top scientific prize from country’s queen

Andrew Hattersley, Professor of Molecular Medicine at the University of Exeter, has won the Baillet Latour Health Prize 2020

Plastic contaminants harm sea urchins

Plastics in the ocean can release chemicals that cause deformities in sea urchin larvae, new research shows.

Newly discovered Amazon rock art show the rainforest’s earliest inhabitants living with giant Ice Age animals

Amazonian rock art newly discovered by researchers provides further proof the rainforest’s earliest inhabitants lived alongside now-extinct giant Ice Age animals.

Public can explore hundreds of new prehistoric, Roman and medieval archaeological sites identified through aerial reconnaissance

The public can explore hundreds of new prehistoric, Roman and medieval sites discovered in Romania by archaeologists using aerial reconnaissance.

Stickleback study reveals 'parallel' evolution

Animal species in different parts of the world can evolve in "parallel" in response to similar conditions, according to a new study of fish.

Brain’s ‘speedometer’ could help solve part of dementia puzzle

Nearly one million people in the UK have dementia

Call for 'debt driving licence'

People borrowing money for the first time should only be given small amounts until they have proved their competence, a new study says.

The Exeter hip: 50 years of making healthcare better

An innovative hip stem developed in Exeter 50 years ago today has now been implanted in more than two million patients across the globe

Exeter team leads Cochrane Review on physical activity for people with congenital heart disease

A team led by the University of Exeter has carried out a detailed review of evidence on physical activity interventions for people with congenital heart disease.

Participants wanted for most in-depth brain study of early Alzheimer’s disease

Exeter researchers are seeking local volunteers to take part in the world’s most detailed study into the onset and development of Alzheimer’s disease

Space worms experiment reveals gravity affects genes

Living at low gravity affects cells at the genetic level, according to a study of worms in space.

Waste fishing gear threatens Ganges wildlife

Waste fishing gear in the River Ganges poses a threat to wildlife including otters, turtles and dolphins, new research shows.

The danger of Z-drugs for dementia patients

Strong sleeping pills known as ‘Z-drugs’ are linked with an increased risk of falls, fractures and stroke among people with dementia

New guide on using drones for conservation

Drones are a powerful tool for conservation – but they should only be used after careful consideration and planning, according to a new report.

University of Exeter, Dorset Museum and Dorset History Centre mark pioneering research

Experts from the University of Exeter, Dorset Museum and Dorset History Centre have celebrated their pioneering research, including on the life and work of the novelist and poet Thomas Hardy.

Liver cancer ten times more likely in men with common genetic disorder haemochromatosis

Men who have the Western world’s most common genetic disorder, haemochromatosis, are ten times more likely to develop liver cancer

COVID-19 is just one factor impacting wellbeing of employees working from home, study finds

A new study on work-life balance has found that the COVID-19 crisis is a crucial factor – but not the only one – behind low levels of wellbeing among employees working from home.

Plant evolves to become less visible to humans

A plant used in traditional Chinese medicine has evolved to become less visible to humans, new research shows.

Indonesian wildfires a 'fixable problem'

Indonesian wildfires that cause widespread air pollution and vast carbon emissions are a "fixable problem", according to the leader of a project set up to help tackle the issue.

International team to examine critical role of culture in building peace and preventing conflict

An international team will embark on a major project to expose and build on the critical role of culture in enhancing possibilities for sustainable peace and preventing conflict.

Bacteria and 3D printers could help restore coral reefs

A team of University of Exeter students are using genetically engineered bacteria to produce a material that could help repair degraded coral reefs.

Pioneering health research at the University of Exeter to continue thanks to renewed Wellcome funding

Pioneering University of Exeter work on worldwide health challenges will continue thanks to renewed funding for a unique research centre.

New anthology of powerful pieces about the climate crisis from writers and scientists

Writers from around the world and climate scientists have penned powerful and thought-provoking pieces about the climate crisis for a new anthology.

Reform of UK company takeover rules would boost productivity and investment, Parliamentarians told

Reforms to company takeover rules could boost UK productivity, increase investment opportunities and limit inefficient management, politicians have been told.

Sexual orientation of men is new ‘STEM gap’, study finds

Men in same-sex relationships are significantly less likely to have a degree in a STEM subject than men in different-sex couples, a new study has shown. 

Exeter experts recognised as being among world’s most influential scientists

Leading academics from the University of Exeter have been recognised as being amongst the world’s most influential researchers, according to a prestigious new ranking.

Exeter part of UK-wide genomics consortium in £12.2million funding boost

A £12.2 million funding boost will help scientists at the University of Exeter and the Royal Devon & Exeter NHS Trust contribute to national efforts to map how COVID-19 spreads and evolves

New app allows people to explore some of Europe’s most historic cities from their own homes

People can step back in time to Renaissance Italy or Elizabethan England as part of a new app which allows people to take exciting tours of some of Europe’s most historic cities from their own homes.

Pacific project will build a circular economy to target plastic pollution

Scientists aim to tackle plastic pollution in the Galapagos Islands and wider Eastern Pacific in a major project based on cooperation with local researchers and communities.

Nearly a third of hospitals in England reached maximum ventilator bed capacity during first wave of Covid-19 pandemic

Thirty percent of hospitals in England reached their maximum occupancy levels for beds with mechanical ventilation support during the early stages of the Covid-19 pandemic

£800k funding to investigate treatments for devastating lung disease

Researchers at the University of Exeter have won more than £800,000 in funding to study a deadly lung disease – idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Teaching and complex tools 'evolved together'

The human ability to teach and our use of complex tools may have evolved together, according to new research.

New funding for research on parent carers in crisis

University of Exeter researchers have been awarded £239,000 to explore suicidal thoughts, homicidal thoughts, and self-harm in parent carers

Migrating animals 'live fast and die young'

Animals that migrate "live fast and die young", new research shows.

Tropical peatland conservation could protect humans from new diseases

Conservation of tropical peatlands could reduce the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and the likelihood of new diseases jumping from animals to humans, researchers say.

Chemical clues in leaves can reveal ash tree resistance to deadly disease

Naturally occurring compounds in ash leaves could be linked to susceptibility of individual trees to the fungal disease ash dieback (ADB), new research shows.

Study reveals physical demands of two-hour marathon

Elite runners need a specific combination of physiological abilities to have any chance of running a sub-two-hour marathon, new research shows.

Experts urge new campaign to stop acrimonious family court battles during relationship breakdowns

A permanent change in cultural attitudes is needed to steer separating parents away from acrimonious legal proceedings during family breakdowns, experts have said. 

Academics in favour of universities refusing funding from nations connected to human rights concerns, survey shows

Academics are in favour of universities refusing funding from foreign organisations and individuals or nations linked with human rights concerns, a new survey of over 1,500 social scientists based in UK universities shows.

Community action and a higher profile in schools key to growth of Cornish language

Community activism and a higher profile in schools will be essential for the numbers speaking Cornish to increase, an expert in the language has said.

University of Exeter and Medicines Discovery Catapult combine to industrialise academic medicines research

Today (November 12th 2020) the University of Exeter and Medicines Discovery Catapult (MDC) announce their strategic partnership to accelerate medicines Research & Development (R&D), creating value for the sector and enhancing translational skills.

Evolution favours new diseases of 'intermediate' severity

New epidemic diseases have an evolutionary advantage if they are of "intermediate" severity, research shows.

Slow down to avoid falls when wearing masks

Older people wearing face masks need to take extra care to make sure they don’t trip over obstacles when walking.

Pioneering new Circular Economy Centre in Technology Metals announced

The University of Exeter will lead a pioneering new research centre, designed to revolutionize how crucial metals are extracted, used and reused in clean and digital technologies across the UK.

Scientists unravel how and why Amazon trees die

A huge new study has unravelled what factors control tree mortality rates in Amazon forests and helps to explain why tree mortality is increasing across the Amazon basin.

Puzzled otters learn from each other

Asian short-clawed otters learn from each other when solving puzzles to get food, a new study shows.

A few kilograms weight loss nearly halves the risk of diabetes, large scale research study finds

Providing support to help people with prediabetes make small changes to their lifestyle, diet and physical activity can almost halve the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.

VSimulators technology to develop footwear for active older people

A project that will use cutting-edge technology to develop safe and comfortable footwear for active older people has received a grant from UK Research and Innovation (UKRI).

New technique could revolutionise accuracy and ease detection of biomechanical alterations of cells and tissues

Scientists have developed an optical elastography technique that could revolutionise the accuracy and ease to which health professionals can detect biomechanical alterations of cells and tissues.

Funding boost for the next generation of environmental scientists

The University of Exeter and its partners have secured a new £3.5m Centre for Doctoral Training with funding from the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) to research chemicals in the environment.

Animal groups consider multiple factors before fighting

Groups of animals consider multiple factors before deciding whether to fight rivals, researchers say.

New research identifies ‘triple trouble’ for mangrove coasts

Some of the world’s most valuable ecosystems are facing a "triple threat" to their long-term durability and survival, new research shows.

Female mongooses start battles for chance to mate

Female banded mongooses lead their groups into fights then try to mate with enemy males in the chaos of battle, new research shows.

Slow-living animal species could be disease ‘reservoirs’

Animals that live slowly – breeding less rapidly and living longer – could be "reservoirs" of diseases that could jump to new species including humans, new research suggests.

Water engineering expert launches new £10 million European water systems project

A University of Exeter academic is set to receive a share of £10 million pounds of funding for a six-year European research project, looking at designing the next generation of intelligent urban drinking water systems.

Widespread public support for job guarantees and exam reform, survey shows

There is strong public support for job guarantees and reforms to exams in 2021 to help young people affected by the coronavirus pandemic, a new survey shows.

'Remarkable' project wins Newton Prize award

A "remarkable" project that aims to bring safe and reliable energy to informal settlements in South Africa has won the Chair's Prize in the 2020 Newton Fund awards.

Basketball fouls can be predicted by personality traits – but not the ones you’d expect

A basketball player can be dishonest or bad-tempered yet is not more likely to commit fouls, a new study has shown.

Sea-level rise will have complex consequences

Rising sea levels will affect coasts and human societies in complex and unpredictable ways, according to a new study that examined 12,000 years in which a large island became a cluster of smaller ones.

New environmental intelligence tool will help protect Cornwall’s wildlife and landscape

An environmental online hub for Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly will help protect the region’s precious wildlife and landscape.

Understanding rare type of diabetes gives insights into critical mechanisms of insulin production

Solving the genetic puzzle of why babies developed a rare type of diabetes has uncovered a new biological pathway that is fundamental to insulin production

Recycle anaesthetics to reduce carbon emission of healthcare, study concludes

New research has highlighted the value of recycling general anaesthetic used in routine operations