Humanities and Social Sciences news

Exeter team brief government on threats to coastal communities

University of Exeter scientists have been commissioned by the Government to write a briefing paper on the health and wellbeing of people living in coastal cities, towns and villages.

High-flying ducks cross Himalayas

A high-flying duck species reaches altitudes of up to 6,800 metres (22,000 feet) to cross the Himalayas, new research shows.

Global rankings rate Exeter in top 200 of world universities

The University of Exeter has remained in the top 200 of universities worldwide in a respected global league table released today, 5 September 2017. 

Breakthrough in understanding mitochondria

Scientists have made a breakthrough in understanding how mitochondria – the “powerhouses” of human cells – are made. 

Otters learn by copying each other

Otters can learn how to solve puzzles by watching and copying each other, new research shows.

Scientists take first snapshots of molecular propeller that runs at 100 degrees Celsius

Scientists have made a new discovery into how ancient microbes that survive in some of the harshest environments propel themselves forward.

Virus reprogrammes ocean plankton

A virus which infects plankton can reprogramme cells and change the way they absorb nutrients, new research shows.

Buildings to generate their own power with innovative glass blocks

Buildings could soon be able to convert the sun’s energy into electricity without the need for solar panels, thanks to innovative new technology.

Telling people not to ‘down’ drinks could make them drink more

Campaigns designed to stop young people “bolting” drinks can make them more likely to do it, new research suggests. 

Evolved masculine and feminine behaviour can be inherited from social environment – not just from genes

The different ways men and women behave, passed down from generation to generation, can be inherited from our social environment – not just from genes, experts have suggested.

Smart doll uses ‘espionage’ powers for education

A controversial “smart doll” has been reprogrammed to enlighten adults rather than potentially spying on children.

‘Inefficient’ sailing fleet keeps oyster fishery alive

Oyster stocks in a Cornish fishery are sustained thanks to “inefficient” traditional fishing methods, new research suggests.

Commuters could help cut Exeter congestion

City commuters could play a pivotal role in helping curb traffic congestion in and around Exeter, thanks to a pioneering initiative.

Hubble Detects Exoplanet with Glowing Water Atmosphere

Scientists have found the strongest evidence to date for a stratosphere on an enormous planet outside our solar system, with an atmosphere hot enough to boil iron.

How to keep your brain sharp in older age

New research from the Global Council on Brain Health (GCBH) has revealed which mentally engaging activities best keep the brain sharp.

Riding the wave: pioneering research tames Nanoquakes

Researchers from the University of Exeter have pioneered a new technique to control high frequency sound waves, commonly found within everyday devices such as mobile phones.

University and leading British surf brand seek wetsuit recycler

A pioneering inventor is being sought to create recycled and recyclable wetsuits.

Children to explore natural world at Science in the Square

Budding nature-lovers will be taken on a voyage of discovery to find out how animals have evolved to deal with friends and foe, at a special interactive event.

Boat noise disrupts fish co-operation

Noise from motorboats changes the behaviour of cleaner fish and the species they help.

How camouflaged birds decide where to blend in

Animals that rely on camouflage can choose the best places to conceal themselves based on their individual appearance, new research shows.

Grown-up gannets find favourite fishing grounds

Like humans, some birds can spend years learning and exploring before developing more settled habits. 

Dementia researchers raise thousands for Alzheimer’s Society in epic bike challenge

Five researchers at the University of Exeter have pedalled from London to Paris, raising thousands of pounds for Alzheimer’s Society.

Exeter researcher wins prestigious diabetes research award

An Exeter researcher has just been awarded £362,337 from leading charity Diabetes UK to understand if certain genes can protect people from developing Type 2 diabetes.

Alcohol boosts recall of earlier learning

Drinking alcohol improves memory for information learned before the drinking episode began, new research suggests.

Supporting coastal communities in Southeast Asia

A group of UK researchers have been awarded funding to help support coastal communities in East and South East Asia that depend on healthy and diverse marine ecosystems.

Exclusion from school can trigger long-term psychiatric illness

Excluding children from school may lead to long- term psychiatric problems and psychological distress, a study of thousands of children has shown.

Sea temperature changes contributing to droughts

Fluctuations in sea surface temperature are a factor in causing persistent droughts, research suggests. 

One minute of running per day associated with better bone health in women

A single minute of exercise each day is linked to better bone health in women, new research shows. 

‘No solid evidence’ for biopesticide-diarrhoea link

A report commissioned by EU food regulators wrongly linked a highly effective biopesticide with diarrhoea in humans, an expert says.

Scientists shed new light on the complex and intricate processes that help the body combat stress

Scientists have developed a pioneering new approach to reveal how the body releases hormones in order to combat stress.

People with dementia benefit from goal-oriented therapy

Personalised cognitive rehabilitation therapy can help people with early stage dementia significantly improve their abilities.

One social hour a week in dementia care improves lives and saves money

Person-centred activities combined with just one hour a week of social interaction can improve quality of life in care homes.

Daily crosswords linked to sharper brain in later life

The more regularly people report doing word puzzles such as crosswords, the better their brain function in later life, a large-scale and robust online trial has found.

Clownfish males become fierce females if their ‘wife’ is eaten

Male clownfish, immortalised in the film Finding Nemo, change sex completely if their female mate is eaten or dies, research by marine biologists shows.

Squirrels have long memory for problem solving

Squirrels can remember problem-solving techniques for long periods and can apply them to new situations, researchers have discovered.

Exeter secures EPSRC grant to revolutionise wireless technologies

The University of Exeter has received a multi-million pound research grant to pioneer new techniques and materials to control and manipulate electromagnetic and acoustic energy.

One in three cases of dementia could be prevented by targeting risk factors from childhood onwards

One in three cases of dementia could be potentially prevented if brain health is improved throughout life.

Experience sights of ancient Exeter using virtual reality

People can step back in time and experience what it would have been like to live among the crowded streets of Georgian Exeter thanks to virtual reality.

Football boosts bone development in boys

Playing football can improve bone development in adolescent boys, new research shows.

Research shortfall on common form of dementia highlighted

New research has highlighted the scarcity of evidence on the prognosis of dementia with Lewy bodies.

Bowel cancer diagnosis delayed by other illness

A new study revealed that additional serious long-term health conditions, such as heart disease, can push a bowel cancer diagnosis back by up to twenty six days.

A fifth of male fish in UK rivers now ‘trans-gender’ due to chemicals in human waste

Anti-depressants flushed down the loo reduce natural shyness in fish.

Hydrogen peroxide protects plants against sun damage

Plants use hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to control how their cells react to varying levels of light, new research shows.

Aspirin reduces risk of pre-eclampsia in pregnant women

Extensive study offers ‘definitive proof’ of improved outcomes in high-risk pregnancies.

Monitoring changes in wetland extent can help predict the rate of climate change

Monitoring changes to the amount of wetlands in regions where permafrost is thawing should be at the forefront of efforts to predict future rates of climate change, new research shows.

Two Exeter diabetes researchers recognised as “Rising Stars”

Two researchers at the University of Exeter Medical School have been recognised as rising stars in diabetes research.

Soapbox Science returns to Exeter

Ever wondered what happens in your brain when you eat chocolate? Or whether Nemo’s dad should’ve been less worried about finding his son and more concerned about ocean acidification?

Role aerosols play in climate change unlocked by spectacular Icelandic volcanic eruption

Cloud systems “well buffered” against aerosol changes in the atmosphere, research shows.

Drowsy dormice doze into decline

Britain’s population of hazel dormice has declined by more than 70%, new research shows.

Mongoose pups conceal identity to survive

Young mongooses may conceal their identity – even from their own parents – to survive.

Light pollution has serious impact on coastal wildlife, research shows

Scientists have recognised for some years that light pollution is a growing phenomenon that impacts on the behaviour and success of many animals.

Shortage of essential diphtheria treatment drugs needs international action, experts warn

International action is needed to tackle a global shortage of medicine which could hinder the ability of doctors to treat diphtheria, experts have warned.

New population of endangered cats found in Borneo

A new population of an endangered and elusive cat species has been found in Borneo.

Banded mongooses target family members for eviction

Banded mongooses target close female relatives when violently ejecting members from their social groups, University of Exeter scientists have found.

A third of emergency cancer patients haven't seen their GP

Around one third (34%) of cancer patients diagnosed as an emergency had not consulted their doctor beforehand, according to a Cancer Research UK funded study published today (Tuesday) in the British Journal of General Practice.

Research moves closer to unravelling mystery cause of multiple sclerosis

A new study has made a major new discovery towards finding the cause of multiple sclerosis (MS), potentially paving the way for research to investigate new treatments.

Want to stay mentally healthy in older age? Stimulate your brain in early life

Stimulating the brain by taking on leadership roles at work or staying on in education help people stay mentally healthy in later life, according to new research.

Captive meerkats at risk of stress

Small groups of meerkats – like those often seen in zoos – are at greater risk of chronic stress.

Computer game helps scientists understand animal camouflage

Computer games have helped scientists understand animal camouflage and colour vision. 

University of Exeter Supports TEDxExeter and Inspiring Ideas

Inspiring ideas, which aim to turn hope into action, will be at the centre of a publicly-accessible event this month at TEDxExeter, sponsored by the University of Exeter.

Global dementia expert gives first lecture as head of Exeter Medical School

World-leading dementia expert Professor Clive Ballard will deliver his first lecture since joining the University of Exeter.

Two in five GPs to ‘quit within five years’

Large scale survey exposes severity of impending GP shortfall.

El Nino reveals impact of global warming on marine production

The extent to which climate change impacts the vital marine food web - which feeds the already pressured global fisheries – is revealed through a new, innovative study.

Ketamine shows positive results for treating severe depression

A new paper sets out principles for responsibly testing innovative treatments for severe depression, based on treating more than 100 patients with approximately 1,000 infusions of ketamine over six years.

Huge permafrost thaw can be limited by ambitious climate targets

Global warming will thaw about 20% more permafrost than previously thought, scientists have warned – potentially releasing significant amounts of greenhouse gases into the Earth’s atmosphere.

Falmouth marine energy test site set for further success

A new lease has been signed for marine renewable energy testing in Falmouth Bay.

Logging threatens breeding turtles

Debris from logging in tropical forests is threatening the survival of hatchling leatherback turtles and the success of mothers at one of the world’s most important nesting sites in Colombia.

Birds to help unravel the inner working of nature’s most complex societies

Prestigious Human Frontiers Science Programme grant awarded to international research team led by University of Exeter

Outdated divorce law causes needlessly painful and destructive breakups, new research finds

Outdated divorce law is causing needlessly painful and destructive breakups and exacerbating conflict between couples, a major new study has found.

Cornish granites could solve riddle of pinpointing metals crucial for low carbon tech

The composition of granite found underneath much of the South West peninsula could offer a vital clue to where deposits of metals crucial for the production of many low carbon technologies can be found.

Early climate ‘payback’ with higher emission reductions

Climate scientists have shown that the early mitigation needed to limit eventual warming below potentially dangerous levels has a climate ‘payback’ much earlier than previously thought.

Stunning image of storm waves crashing against lighthouse wins critical acclaim

A stunning photograph offering a bird’s eye view of waves crashing against the craggy rocks housing a remote lighthouse has received critical acclaim.

Weather forecasting technology used to predict where proteins anchor within human cells

Met Office technology used to study climate change is being used by scientists to predict the sorting and location of proteins in cells of the human body.

Exeter Bioscientist on exclusive list of top 50 entrepreneurs honoured at House of Commons

A Biosciences expert from the University of Exeter is celebrating after being honoured as one of an exclusive group of leading entrepreneurs, at a special ceremony at the House of Commons.

Devon Hospitals Race Ahead to Hit Target on Women on Boards

Devon health trusts are setting the pace for representation of women at the top of the NHS. The local hospital trusts have hit the official target for women on NHS boards three years ahead of schedule.

Dementia: The right to rehabilitation

Rehabilitation is as important for people with dementia as it is for people with physical disabilities, according to a leading dementia expert.

Professor Andrew Thompson appointed Chief Executive of the Arts and Humanities Research Council

Professor Andrew Thompson has been appointed Chief Executive of the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) following a term as interim chief, Science Minister Jo Johnson has confirmed.

New tool will help GPs decide if patients under 50 have serious bowel condition

A new research-backed risk assessment tool will support GPs in identifying the symptoms of bowel cancer and inflammatory bowel disease in patients aged under 50.

£2 million to improve rehabilitation of older people after hospital discharge

Researchers have received £2 million of funding to conduct a five year national study looking at how rehabilitation can be improved for older people with frailty following discharge from hospital.

Republicans less likely to be critical about Obamacare when reminded about their own medical needs

US Republican voters are less likely to be critical about the performance of the controversial “Obamacare” health reforms when they are reminded about their own medical needs, new research shows.

The foundation of aquatic life can rapidly adapt to global warming, new research suggests

Important microscopic creatures which produce half of the oxygen in the atmosphere can rapidly adapt to global warming, new research suggests.

Can online therapy reduce distress in dementia carers?

A new study is inviting people who care for someone with dementia to help investigate whether an online therapy can help carers cope with feeling of stress, anxiety or depression.

Impact of wobbly bridges and sky-scrapers on human health to be tested in government-funded research centre

The impact of vibrations from very tall buildings and wobbly bridges and floors on people’s health and wellbeing is to be researched in a new £7.2 million government-funded national research facility.

Extensive ice cap once covered sub-antarctic island of South Georgia

A new study reveals the sub-antarctic island of South Georgia – famous for its wildlife – was covered by a massive ice cap during the last ice age.

School children unpick genetic baking riddle in University labs

Pupils from Westcountry schools used genetic processes commonly seen in TV crime dramas to help solve the mystery of who is sabotaging Devon’s very own Bake Off.

Exeter scientist wins prestigious dementia prize

University of Exeter researcher Dr Katie Lunnon has won the Early Career Investigator of the Year Award at the Alzheimer’s Research UK Conference 2017.

Soft coral species exhibit strikingly different patterns of connectivity around the British Isles

The evolution of land animals has been shaped by barriers such as oceans and mountains which have divided them and sent them down different genetic paths. 

Devon’s beavers win top BBC Countryfile award

The remarkable story of Devon’s wild beavers goes on with the announcement that the Westcountry rodents have now won a top national award.

Breeding oilseed rape varieties for pollinator-friendly traits

Amounts and sugar content of nectar vary between commercial varieties of oilseed rape (OSR) produced with different breeding systems, when tested in the glasshouse. 

Celebrating 10 years of European Research Council funding

The University of Exeter will commemorate the 10th anniversary of the European Research Council (ERC) with a celebratory public event at the Streatham Campus.

Project tackling barriers to Higher Education receives £500,000 funding boost

A pioneering new project which seeks to tackle potential barriers faced by students with vocational qualifications when they enter higher education, has received a significant funding boost.

Diabetes expert wins top international scientific award

A world expert in diabetes will deliver a lecture presented as the top international science award by Diabetes UK.

Scientists develop calculators to help clinicians decide on best diabetes treatments

People with diabetes could benefit from digital ‘risk calculators’ in the future that help healthcare professionals prescribe the best combination of medicine for each person. 

Exeter Engages with Europe

The University of Exeter has undertaken a week of engagement work with institutions and supporters across the European continent.

Student volunteers help Exeter’s homeless by distributing excess campus food

Students from the University of Exeter are joining forces with a local charity by distributing unsold food to the city’s homeless community.

Blueberry concentrate improves brain function in older people

Drinking concentrated blueberry juice improves brain function in older people, according to research by the University of Exeter.

Ancient peoples shaped Amazon rainforest

The Amazon rainforest was shaped by ancient people who lived there, new research reveals.

World expert in brain function adds to Exeter’s research excellence

A world expert in measuring brain function will give his first lecture at the University of Exeter.

Exploring the economic value of trees’ social and environmental benefits

The social and environmental outputs of woodlands play a much broader role in the economy than is often recognised, according to a new Research Report by the University of Exeter for the Forestry Commission.

Biggest ever archive of children’s writing created to help experts assess language skills

Experts will collect the most extensive archive to date of children’s school work as part of a major project seeking to track how the way they use language changes as they get older.

Caledonian forests threatened by climatic change

Efforts to conserve the remaining fragments of the great Forest of Caledon in Scotland may be doomed to fail unless a new strategy is rapidly adopted, new research suggests.

Scientists reveal core genes involved in honey bee immunity

An international team of researchers has identified a core set of genes involved in the responses of honey bees to multiple diseases caused by viruses and parasites.

Declining Arctic sea ice does influence European weather – but is not a cause of colder winters

The dramatic loss of Arctic sea ice through climate change is unlikely to lead to more severe winter weather across Northern Europe, new research has shown.

Banded mongooses go to war over sex and territory

Gang warfare is not unique to humans – banded mongooses do it too.

Planned protection area would help basking sharks

A proposed Marine Protected Area (MPA) off Scotland’s west coast would help basking sharks, researchers say.

Watching birds near your home is good for your mental health

People living in neighbourhoods with more birds, shrubs and trees are less likely to suffer from depression, anxiety and stress, according to research.

Exeter helps protect Myanmar marine life

A new plan to protect Myanmar’s diverse marine life has been announced.

People with cystic fibrosis ‘should get exercise plans’

People with cystic fibrosis could benefit from being prescribed personalised exercise plans by healthcare professionals, according to experts at the University of Exeter.

Exeter doctor wins prestigious diabetes research award

A University of Exeter researcher has just been awarded nearly £800,000 to find out why Type 1 diabetes develops in babies.

Impacts of mass coral die-off on Indian Ocean reefs revealed

Warming seawaters threaten the stability of tropical coral reefs, with potentially devastating implications for many reef species and the human communities that reefs support.

Warming ponds could accelerate climate change

Rising temperatures could accelerate climate change by reducing the amount of carbon dioxide stored in ponds and increasing the methane they release, new research shows.

Gene editing could help tackle cancer and inherited diseases

Gene editing techniques developed in the last five years could help in the battle against cancer and inherited diseases.

Basking sharks seek out winter sun

The winter habits of Britain’s basking sharks have been revealed for the first time.

App combines latest research to help users curb food cravings

Experts are seeking volunteers to test a research-based app that aims to help users curb cravings for unhealthy foods and lose weight.

First comprehensive legal guide for cyber behaviour published by University of Exeter expert

The first comprehensive guide covering the legal rules of behaviour in cyberspace, which will be used by governments around the world, has been published by a University of Exeter academic.

Listening to music can improve unconscious attitudes towards other cultures

Listening to five minutes of West African or Indian pop music can give the listener more positive attitudes towards those cultures, research from the Universities of Oxford and Exeter has found.

Tough early life makes wild animals live longer

Growing up in tough conditions can make wild animals live longer, new research suggests.

Climate change and fishing create ‘trap’ for penguins

Endangered penguins are foraging for food in the wrong places due to fishing and climate change, research led by the University of Exeter and the University of Cape Town has revealed.

University of Exeter launches its largest ever fundraising Campaign

The University of Exeter has launched its most ambitious philanthropic Campaign to date to reinforce its position as one of the leading research institutions worldwide.

Celebrity divorce lawyer backs research to help strengthen couple relationships

Prominent divorce lawyer Baroness Shackleton is funding new University of Exeter research which could help uncover the secret of finding life-long love.

Hundreds of ancient earthworks built in the Amazon

The Amazonian rainforest was transformed over two thousand years ago by people who built hundreds of large, mysterious earthworks.

Increasing water table in agricultural peatland could cut UK greenhouse gas emissions

Increasing the water table could help to slow down global warming, boost crop yields and preserve peat soils, according to a new study.

New drive to tackle deadly global disease

The University of Exeter is part of a pan-European partnership worth almost 30 million Euros to improve the prevention and management of Diabetic Kidney Disease.

LED lighting could have major impact on wildlife

LED street lighting can be tailored to reduce its impacts on the environment, according to new research by the University of Exeter.

Nobel Laureates to deliver keynote speeches at Living Systems Institute Opening International Symposium

Two Nobel Laureates will deliver keynote speeches at a prestigious international scientific symposium celebrating the opening of the University of Exeter’s Living Systems Institute (LSI).

Emoticons help gauge school happiness level in young children

A new questionnaire based on emoticon-style facial expressions could help teachers and others who work with children as young as four to engage them on their happiness levels in the classroom.

Predator threat boosts friendships among guppies

Danger from predators causes animals to form stronger friendships, according to new research.

Low level of oxygen in Earth’s middle ages delayed evolution for two billion years

A low level of atmospheric oxygen in Earth’s middle ages held back evolution for two billion years, raising fresh questions about the origins of life on this planet.

New genes for height revealed in global study of 700,000 people

83 new genetic variants that strongly influence human height have been discovered in a study.

‘Mirror game’ test could secure early detection of schizophrenia, study shows

Virtual reality could hold the key to unlocking an affordable, reliable and effective device to provide early diagnosis and management of schizophrenia.

Climate change scientists should think more about sex

Urgent need to check how males and females respond differently to ocean acidification.

Antibiotics can boost bacterial reproduction

The growth of bacteria can be stimulated by antibiotics, scientists at the University of Exeter have discovered.

Role of terrestrial biosphere in counteracting climate change may have been underestimated

Research suggests the capacity of the terrestrial biosphere to absorb carbon dioxide may have been underestimated in past calculations due to certain land-use changes not being fully taken into account.

Rare footage of mother and baby beavers in the River Otter

Public invited to take part in a national survey on whether beavers should be reintroduced permanently into Britain

New research to act as a catalyst to help GPs diagnose cancer

A revolutionary Cancer Research UK-funded project will investigate ways of bringing new and improved cancer diagnostic tests to GPs.

Forests ‘held their breath’ during global warming hiatus, research shows

Global forest ecosystems, widely considered to act as the lungs of the planet, ‘held their breath’ during the most recent occurrence of a warming hiatus, new research has shown.

Mammal testing could be cut by moth larvae

The number of mammals used in animal testing could be cut dramatically and replaced with moth larvae.

Breakthrough by Exeter cell biologists

We all need contacts – how organelles hug in cells

GW4 joins industry partners to develop ‘first of its kind’ supercomputer

GW4 Alliance, together with Cray Inc. and the Met Office, has been awarded £3m by EPSRC to deliver a new Tier 2 high performance computing (HPC) service for UK-based scientists.

Prehistoric mega-lake sediment offers key insight into how inland regions responded to ‘super-greenhouse’ event

Sediment found at the site of one of the largest lakes in Earth’s history could provide a fascinating new insight into how inland regions responded to global climate change millions of years ago.

Why hospital antibiotic management strategies do little to curb resistance

With an alarming growth in antibiotic resistance and doctors increasingly having to resort to last-chance antibiotics to save patients, is there a better way for hospitals to manage antibiotic treatment regimens?

Research shows driving factors behind changes between local and global carbon cycles

Research has provided a fascinating insight in the quest to determine whether temperature or water availability is the most influential factor in determining the success of global, land-based carbon sinks.

Intensive animal production may boost flu pandemic threat

Mass livestock production is driving molecular changes in diseases that could lead to human pandemics, according to an expert from the University of Exeter.

Exeter research helps protect loggerhead turtles

A long-running research and conservation project is helping save an at-risk species of turtle.

Mother-daughter conflict between killer whales can explain the evolution of menopause

An international research team have found that mother-daughter conflict can explain why killer whales are one of only three known species of mammal, including humans, to go through the menopause.

Mutations responsible for cleft palate and related birth defects identified

Study of Amish and Saudi Arabian families finds mutations in HYAL2 gene that impact development.

No silver bullet to beating obesity, study finds

New research challenges previous findings that any single aspect of diet or lifestyle can be targeted to reduce the risk of obesity in adults with a high genetic risk of putting on weight.

Climate change has mixed effects on migratory geese

Climate change improves the breeding chances of migratory geese in the Arctic – but puts mother geese at more risk of death, according to a new study.

Dry January: Ketamine trial could help free Devon man from alcoholism

Just two months ago, Marcus was drinking up to seven bottles of wine a night and regularly blacking out, sometimes finding himself in police custody.

Using ‘fire to fight fire’ to combat disease, including cancer, could make it worse, tests show

A treatment billed as a potential breakthrough in the fight against disease, including cancer, could back-fire and make the disease fitter and more damaging, new research has found.

Family squabbles over Christmas? Re-playing arguments in detail may be the best way to cope with them.

Re-playing an argument in your head and recalling what happened in detail can be therapeutic and prevent you getting quarrels out of proportion, or becoming depressed and anxious as a result.

Queen awards Exeter academics in New Year’s Honours

Three outstanding academics at the University of Exeter have been recognised with prestigious awards in the Queen’s New Year’s honours list.

Gut microorganisms affect our physiology

Researchers have found evidence that could shed new light on the complex community of trillions of microorganisms living in all our guts, and how they interact with our bodies.

Ash dieback: Insect threat to fungus-resistant trees

Ash trees which can resist the killer dieback fungus may be more vulnerable to attacks by insects, according to new research.

Teachers and support staff lack training to tackle “taboo” of self-harm in schools

The majority of teachers and support staff lack the time and training they need to support students who self-harm, according to a new report co-led by the University of Exeter.

Government plans to tackle gender pay only superficial, experts warn

New regulations requiring companies to report pay gaps between men and women are potentially “superficial” and will not necessarily tackle the complex reasons why females still have lower salaries.

Experts secure £5m to protect the South West’s natural capital

A partnership of three research institutions, led by the University of Exeter, has secured a £5m award to help protect the beautiful natural resources and the jobs dependent on them in the South West.

Mass insect migrations in UK skies

As Britain voted for Brexit amid furious debate over migration, trillions of migrants were coming and going, unseen by all but the sharpest eyes.

Male bumblebees leave home without looking back

Male bumblebees leave home and fly away without looking back, making no effort to remember the location of the nest, researchers at the University of Exeter have found.

Mysteries of Father Christmas ‘solved’ by relativity theory

The mystery of how Father Christmas can deliver presents to 700 million children in one night, fit down the chimney and arrive without being seen or heard has been ‘solved’ by a physicist.

New public sector energy company announced for Devon

New public sector energy company announced for Devon.

Exeter research wins Elsevier Atlas prize

A University of Exeter research paper on using mobile phones to manage disease outbreaks has won a prestigious prize.

Ground-breaking production method could accelerate worldwide ‘graphene revolution’

Ground-breaking production method could accelerate worldwide ‘graphene revolution’

Science behind lightning strikes right note in festive family event hosted at the University of Exeter

Families from across the South West were given a dazzling flash of inspiration and entertainment during a special festive treat, organised jointly by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) and the University of Exeter.

Commuter-led project to cut congestion set to move into second gear

The first stage of a commuter-driven initiative designed to help reduce traffic congestion has revealed some fascinating results, organisers have said.

Consortium awarded £5.5 million to increase HE participation from disadvantaged backgrounds

The University of Exeter is part of a South-West consortium of universities and colleges that has won £5.5 million in funding to inspire young people from disadvantaged backgrounds into higher education.

Longest-living animal gives climate change clues

A study of the longest-living animal on Earth, the quahog clam, has demonstrated the vital role oceans play in the planet’s changing climate.

Exeter achieves first class award in sustainability league

The University of Exeter has been awarded a first-class score for environmental and ethical performance in the People & Planet 2016 university league table.

New mothers preoccupied with their problems can find it more difficult to respond to their babies

Mothers who have repetitive and self-focused negative thoughts about their own problems can have poorer-quality relationships with their babies, new research from the University of Exeter shows.

Beach litter study finds rise in polystyrene foam, balloons and fishing nets

Researchers from the University of Exeter and Plymouth Marine Laboratory have studied the findings from beach litter surveys carried out over a ten year period.

Laser technique boosts aerial imaging of woodlands

A ground-breaking technique which allows green spaces to be mapped in 3D from an aircraft could boost biodiversity, aid human wellbeing and even help protect rainforests.

Vital vaccine could “reduce burden” of dengue disease in hardest-hit regions

The first licensed vaccine for the potentially life-threatening dengue virus should only be used in moderate-to high impacted regions, new research has predicted.

Thousands could benefit from greater use of revolutionary stroke treatment

Almost 10,000 UK stroke patients a year could benefit from a new procedure, according to research presented today at the UK Stroke Forum Conference in Liverpool.

Exeter’s New Living Systems Institute hosts ‘Global Conversation’

The pioneering and world-leading research conducted at the University of Exeter’s state-of-the-art Living Systems Institute (LSI) will form the basis of the latest high-profile Global Conversation event.

World-leading Ocean Energy Professor receives prestigious international scholarship

One of the world’s leading Renewable Energy experts has received a prestigious international award, in recognition to his ground-breaking research into ocean energy and technology.

Children invited to explore the science of Christmas

Top scientists will put their minds to Christmas conundrums at a family friendly science event in Falmouth on Wednesday 14 December.

Should parents lie to children about Santa?

Shops are bursting with toys, mince pies are on the menu and radios are blasting out Christmas tunes – so it’s time for another festive favourite: lying to children.

Exeter partners with Chinese government to offer PhD scholarships

The University of Exeter has agreed to sign an agreement with the Chinese government that will see hundreds of China's best students study in Devon and Cornwall over the next decade and beyond.

Electronic Tracking of Song Birds Shows Roads and Urban Features Influence Choice of Gardens

Bird feeders visited more often in suburban gardens than terraced streets.

New project aims to strengthen creative and cultural economy in South West England and South East Wales

A new project to broker partnerships between the arts and humanities sector and universities in South West England and South East Wales to generate economic growth has received funding.

‘Minimal’ shoes may reduce running injuries

Runners who wear trainers with no cushioning and land on the ball of their foot rather than the heel put significantly less demand on their bodies, new research suggests.

Nearly £6 million for patient-centred research facility

An Exeter research facility which puts people at its heart has received nearly £6 million in funding over the next five years.

Universities unite with industry to foster next generation researchers

The University of Exeter is part of a newly awarded £19 million doctorial training partnership programme with industry leaders.

Stories of hope and fear from Syria on display at the University of Exeter

Powerful art and artefacts from Syria and the chance to hear from a doctor detained by the Assad regime are part of a series of events at the University of Exeter.

Concept of "glass cliff" resonates for women

The inventors of the term “glass cliff” – which appears on the shortlist for the Oxford Dictionaries word of the year 2016 – say it has found fame because it resonates for so many women.

Exeter professor appointed to influential global research advisory group

A world-leading social scientist from the University of Exeter has been appointed to an influential global research group, designed to pioneer new ways to tackle some of today’s greatest challenges.

New report recommends measures to improve dementia care

Enabling people with dementia to maintain control of the decisions surrounding their care is key to avoiding isolation, according to a new report by the British Psychological Society (BPS).

Microplastics’ Impact on Human Health Needs “Urgent Research,” says leading expert

One of the world’s foremost marine pollution experts has welcomed today’s (Monday) announcement that there will be a Government review into the impact of microplastics on human health.

Exeter experts join global response to climate change health crisis

Experts at the University of Exeter will join forces with 15 other organisations worldwide to drive action on climate change given potential “catastrophic risk to human health”.

Even physicists are "afraid" of mathematics

Physicists avoid highly mathematical work despite being trained in advanced mathematics, new research suggests.

Production of seedless fruits an under-estimated tool for improving food security, research shows

The opportunity to produce bountiful levels of vital food crops such as apples, tomatoes and watermelons could be boosted by reducing a crop’s demand for pollinators, new research has shown.

First UK assessment of underwater noise published

The first assessment of underwater noise in the UK marine environment has been carried out by a research partnership including the University of Exeter.

The Prince of Wales praises work of University of Exeter farming experts

The Prince of Wales has praised the work of University of Exeter experts to help support small family farms.

New partnership between Exeter and the Center for Whale Research

The Vice Chancellor met with Professor Darren Croft and Dr Deborah Giles at the Center for Whale Research on San Juan Islands USA to talk about the work they have been doing.

Wave energy device successfully deployed at BiMEP site

The final section of a sophisticated wave energy device has been successfully installed by a collaborative research team in the Bay of Biscay, on the northern coast of Spain.

Hundreds of bat deaths at wind farms could be prevented, finds new research

Hundreds of bat deaths at on-shore windfarms in the UK could be prevented by better risk assessments and simple changes to the operation of turbines.

Bees use multiple cues in hunt for pollen

Bees use a variety of senses and memory of previous experiences when deciding where to forage for pollen, research by the University of Exeter suggests.

Large-scale study reveals new insights into coral and symbiotic algae partnership

A large-scale study of Caribbean coral has yielded discoveries on the pairing process between an endangered coral and the microscopic symbiotic algae they rely on for survival.

Soil could become a significant source of carbon dioxide, experts warn

If people continue using and changing land over the next century in the same way they currently do, soils will have limited potential to counter the effect of climate change. 

Call for government investment to strengthen advanced engineering and digital innovation industries

South West England and South East Wales can lead the UK and compete with the world in the areas of advanced engineering and digital innovation, and has called for targeted government investment in these areas.

Forgotten language found in poems uncovered by a University of Exeter expert

Moving poetry in now forgotten Lancashire regional dialects written generations ago is being uncovered by a University of Exeter academic.

Exeter seals new strategic collaborations with University of British Columbia

The University of British Columbia (UBC) and the University of Exeter sealed new strategic collaborations during meetings in Vancouver in October.

Exeter Professor appointed as environmental charity board trustee

Professor David Butler, Director of the internationally-leading Centre for Water Systems, has been appointed as a trustee of a vital South West environmental charity.

Food supply – not ‘live fast, die young’ mentality – makes male crickets chirpy

Shedding a few pounds might be a good strategy in the human dating game, but for crickets the opposite is true.

New warning over spread of ash dieback

The ash dieback fungus could spread more quickly and affect more trees than previously expected, according to research at the University of Exeter.

Take advantage of evolution in malaria fight, scientists say

Scientists could harness the power of evolution to stop mosquitoes spreading malaria, according to new research by the University of Exeter and the University of California, Berkeley.

New Exeter Clinical Trials Unit boost to health research

The University of Exeter’s new dedicated unit to facilitate and conduct clinical trials in health research will officially launch next month.

No evidence climate change boosts coffee plant disease

Fears that climate change is promoting a fungal disease which can devastate coffee crops may be unfounded, research by the University of Exeter suggests.

Wanted: Hedgehogs, Dead or Alive

The public have been urged to help solve the mystery of why one of Britain’s best-loved animals, the hedgehog, is in decline.

Prestigious prize enables scholar to tell the story of English Romanticism

A University of Exeter academic has won a prestigious prize which will allow her to write a major cultural history of the emergence of English Romanticism.

Climate Change Impairs the Survival Instincts of Fish and Can Make Them Swim Towards Predators

Fish farms may hold key to studying the impact of rising CO2 on marine life, and if fish could adapt to climate change.

Exeter wins £1.5m funding for world-leading initiative to advance health research

The University of Exeter has been awarded £1.5 million by Wellcome to enable translation of findings from its world-leading research programmes into improvements in human health on a global scale.

Scientists find link between tropical storms and decline of river deltas

A change in the patterns of tropical storms is threatening the future of the Mekong River delta in Vietnam, indicating a similar risk to other deltas around the world, new research shows.

Violent wind collision zone between two stars seen for the first time

The tumultuous region between two stars has been revealed for the first time, thanks to state of the art infrared imaging techniques.

Exeter expert starts a “mindfulness revolution” in Kenyan prison

A University of Exeter academic is helping to rehabilitate prisoners in high security Kenyan jails by teaching them to practice mindfulness.

University sees huge rise in research funding

The University of Exeter has more than doubled the amount of research funding it receives from Research Councils UK (RCUK), bucking the trend for falling government investment in research in the university sector.

Non-smoking planet: clues for tipping from vicious to virtuous behaviour identified

A new analysis shows that social norms can cross tipping points faster if new behaviour is difficult for others to ignore. 

Scientists search for regional accents in cod

Fish may have regional accents and use slightly different “chatter” in different parts of the world.

The Age of the Beard: magnificent examples of 19th-century facial hair on display

A photographic display of magnificent examples of 19th-century facial hair and a special version of the pantomime Bluebeard are part of a new exhibition.

Large animals, such as the imperious African elephant, most vulnerable to impact of human expansion

Some of the most iconic giants of the animal kingdom, such as the imperious African elephant and the majestic lion, are most vulnerable to the detrimental impact of human expansion.

Exeter expert urges scrutiny of genome editing

New methods of genome editing which could increase food production rates in farmed animals require urgent ethical scrutiny, according to a University of Exeter expert.

Exeter scientists awarded prestigious Royal Society University Research Fellowships

Three outstanding early-career scientists from the University of Exeter have been bestowed with prestigious fellowships from the Royal Society.

How baby’s genes influence birth weight and later life disease

New research finds genetic differences that help to explain why some babies are born bigger or smaller than others.

Coastal wildlife more vulnerable to microplastics than expected

Coastal dwelling marine wildlife, including crabs, lobsters and shellfish, which play a crucial role in the food chain, are more vulnerable to harmful plastic pollution than previously expected.

Medical historians and social scientists helping to tackle the world’s most pressing public health problems

Researchers at the University of Exeter will work with the World Health Organization to tackle the world’s most pressing public health problems.

Exeter secures ‘best of the South West’ position in Times Good University Guide

Exeter has been named the top university in the South West in the influential The Times and The Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017.

New guide to Devon’s top swear words and insults

Calling someone a nippy or ninnycock today might not cause much offence – but hundreds of years ago if you wanted to be rude these were among a rich choice of crude words available.

Ocean fronts attract ocean wanderers – foraging gannets on the front line

Foraging seabirds use oceanic fronts as an efficient means to forage for food, according to an international study that could help safeguard the future of protected species.

'Green exercise’ in England benefits health to the tune of £2.2 billion a year

Physical activity in natural environments, or ‘green exercise’, is estimated to provide health benefits of £2.2 billion a year to the English adult population.

More than one in ten UK species threatened with extinction, new study finds

Climate change, urban expansion and agricultural intensification blamed for risk to some of Britain’s best loved species

Study suggests genes and environment interact to increase risk of obesity

New research presented at this year’s European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) meeting in Munich, Germany (12-16 September) shows that environmental and lifestyle factors have greatest effects on obesity in those who also carry the most obesity genes.

Seek and you shall find – bees remain excellent searchers even when ill

Honeybees are hardwired to efficiently search the landscape enabling them to continue working for the greater good of their hives even when they are sick, according to new research.

New drone technology will uncover secrets of Amazonian tribes

Experts hope to uncover the hidden secrets of ancient Amazon tribes and their effect on modern vegetation using revolutionary new drone technology.

Unprecedented atmospheric behaviour disrupts one of the earth’s most regular climate cycles

A team of scientists has discovered an unexpected disruption in one of the most repeatable atmospheric patterns.

Induced climate change ‘tug of war’ keeps scientists guessing on storm tracks

The effects of man-made climate change can hamper scientific projections of how key global weather patterns will act in the future, a new study has revealed.

Teenage weight gain down to dramatic drop in calories they burn

Ground breaking research shows teens burn up to 500 less calories in puberty

African fishers undertake highly risky expeditions to make a living

Fishers in Central Africa often cover hundreds of miles in very basic boats without engines searching for food to feed their families and make a living, a new study shows.

Exeter professor awarded prestigious diabetes prize

A world-leading diabetes expert at the University of Exeter Medical School has won a top international Diabetes prize in recognition of his research and its worldwide impact on patient care.

University of Exeter expert welcomes microbead ban

A University of Exeter expert has welcomed the announcement by the Government today that plastic microbeads in cosmetics will be banned. 

Rotten egg gas could help protect diabetics from heart complications

A gas that was formerly known for its noxious qualities could help people with diabetes recover from heart and blood vessel complications.

Progress in refining the genetic causes of schizophrenia

An international study has made advances in understanding the ways in which genetic risk factors alter gene function in schizophrenia. 

Exeter student tackles plight of child brides in Bangladesh

A student with close ties to Bangladesh has just returned from a research mission to raise awareness of the damaging culture of child marriage.

New laser to help Exeter scientists study brain changes in dementia

Dementia researchers have been awarded £91,500 to purchase a new laser to create a state-of-the-art microscope, transforming their ability to image the brain.

University of Exeter welcomes call for ban on microbeads in cosmetics

A University of Exeter academic has welcomed calls from MPs for a ban on the use of microbeads in cosmetics because of the marine pollution they are causing.

Biological invasions threaten biodiversity, economy and human livelihood in developing countries

Invasions from alien species threaten the economies and livelihoods of residents of some of the world’s poorest nations.

Scientists develop interactive game demonstrating impact of climate change on the Antarctic Ice Sheet

Scientists and games developers have joined forces to help communicate the impact of climate change on the Antarctic Ice Sheet.

Climate change alters the rules of sperm competition in the sea

The impact of climate change on global seawater conditions could change the rules of sperm competition for many important marine species.

Sea habits of migratory birds highlight conservation need in the Canary Current

Scientists have tracked the behaviour of seabirds migrating across the Atlantic to better understand how these animals use the marine environment.

Humble moss helped create our oxygen-rich atmosphere

The evolution of the first land plants including mosses may explain a long-standing mystery of how Earth’s atmosphere became enriched with oxygen.

Long-lived parents could mean a healthier heart into your seventies

The longer our parents lived, the longer we are likely to live ourselves, and the more likely we are to stay healthy in our sixties and seventies.

Exeter professor honoured for world-class fish research

A University of Exeter marine biologist has won a prestigious award for his world-class work in the field of fish ecology.

Experts to use drones to discover more about killer whales

Drones will be used to discover more about the social lives of killer whales and help conserve these amazing mammals, which are at risk of extinction.

Retired holidaymakers asked to share their tourism stories

Retired holidaymakers are needed to take part in new research which aims to discover how giving up work has affected their tourism choices.

Ambulance call-out research leads to positive changes for ambulance service trust

Research investigating the reasons behind a rise in ambulance call-outs in the South West is already being used by a local ambulance service trust.

Expert on political crisis wins top psychology award

An expert on the psychology of political crisis is to receive this year’s Presidents’ Award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychological Knowledge from the British Psychological Society.

World’s largest behavioural ecology conference comes to Exeter

The University of Exeter will host global research leaders in the field of behavioural ecology on July 28 to August 3.

Help test new online depression therapy

People feeling low or depressed are being offered the opportunity to take part in a study exploring the effectiveness of a simple new therapy online. 

Did you experience drought of ‘76?

Researchers are urging people who experienced the 1976 drought to share their stories of how they coped during the most severe water shortage in living memory.

High chance that current atmospheric greenhouse concentrations commit to warmings greater than 1.5 °C

Current levels of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations warm air temperatures overland by over 1.5°C.

Behavioural Activation as effective as CBT for depression, at lower cost

A simple and inexpensive therapy is equally as effective at treating depression as the “gold standard” of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy.

Exercise can change brain structure and reduce dementia risk

Getting regular exercise can lower the risk of cognitive decline and can even change our brain structure.

Tiny microbe turns tropical butterfly into male killer, scientists discover

A scientist from the University of Exeter has helped to identify a male-killing microbe in a tropical butterfly called the African Queen.

Traumatic brain injury costs £15 billion a year in the UK, says new research

Traumatic brain injury costs a total of £15 billion nationally every year and puts young people at higher risk of poor mental health and offending.

Acting together can reduce the risks climate change poses to the UK

The independent Committee on Climate Change today concludes that the impacts of climate change are already being felt in the UK, and urgent action is required to address climate-related risks. 

Major study reveals steep decline in number of small family farms

A major new independent study commissioned by The Prince’s Countryside Fund into the future of small family farms across the UK, has revealed a steep decline in numbers since the beginning of the century.

Experts listen in on noisy Falmouth seas

A long-term plan for managing noise in shallow parts of the ocean such as Falmouth Bay is needed to protect the environment, scientists have said.

Further improvements to recruitment, retention and training of Army Reserve Forces needed

Improvements to the way that Army Reserve Forces are trained and supported are needed if recruitment targets are to be met.

Exeter researchers to hold free dementia information day

Scientists in Exeter are inviting the public to a free meeting on Wednesday 6 July to discuss current dementia research.

Be wary of knotweed advice on the web, researchers warn

Gardeners turning to the internet for advice about Japanese knotweed are likely to find a wide range of potentially misleading advice.

Exeter expert delivers talk to UN on ocean plastic pollution

A marine pollution expert from the University of Exeter has given a high level presentation at the United Nations headquarters.

Exeter physicist wins prestigious award for experimental research

A University of Exeter lecturer has been honoured with a medal and prize for his outstanding contribution to experimental Physics.

Victims of flooding frustrated by Government support

Victims need clearer information on what they can expect in the aftermath of major flooding from the government and other authorities, new University of Exeter research shows.

Night-time light pollution causes Spring to come early

Human use of artificial light is causing Spring to come at least a week early in the UK.

South West celebrates 100,000 Genomes Project

Families affected by rare conditions or cancer across the South West are having their genomes sequenced as part of a national research bid. 

Birds pushed to the edge by floods

A flock of cranes that ended up at the centre of a once-in-200-year flood has given researchers a rare insight into how wildlife copes with extreme weather.

In pheasant harems, bigger is not always better

Too many females in a wild pheasant harem harms the ability of the group to spot predators, experts from the University of Exeter have found.

Scientists uncover route for finding out what makes individuals nice or nasty

A University of Exeter scientist has helped develop an innovative mathematical model for exploring why some individuals evolve to be genetically programmed to be nice, while others stay nasty.

Better information needed to understand extreme weather

Scientists need more credible and relevant information to help communities become more resilient to extreme weather events such as floods.

University of Exeter expert welcomes UNESCO status for rare historical document

One of Exeter Cathedral’s greatest treasures – and the focus of new research by a University of Exeter expert – has been honoured for its ‘outstanding significance’ to British history.

University of Exeter researchers offer local clubs and societies £1,000 team challenge

Researchers at the University of Exeter are inviting groups of people from across Cornwall to take part in a fun experiment.

Major outbreak of pest moth spotted in Cornwall

Millions of moths that destroy vegetable crops have been spotted in Cornwall by a University of Exeter expert.

El Nino drives fastest annual increase on record of carbon dioxide

The rising concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide has passed a symbolic threshold early due to the fastest annual increase on record.

Carbon dioxide biggest player in thawing permafrost

Carbon dioxide emissions from dry and oxygen-rich environments are likely to play a much greater role in controlling future rates of climate change.

Camouflage influences life-and-death decisions that animals make

Nesting birds time their escape from an approaching predator depending on how well camouflaged their eggs and their own bodies are.

Risk-taking in birds is more contagious at certain times, research shows

Birds copy one another when trying new foods but will take more risks when doing so at different times of year.

Humans could learn something from pigeons to improve their efficiency

Humans could become better at switching between tasks if they behaved more like pigeons.

Flamingo researcher wins top award

A zoo biologist from the University of Exeter has won a prestigious gold award for his research into flamingo friendships.

New cheap method of surveying landscapes can capture environmental change

Cheap cameras on drones can be used to measure environmental change which affects billions of people around the world, new research from the University of Exeter shows.

New research shows South West farmers concerned by Brexit

Farmers have expressed concern about the unknown implications of Britain leaving the European Union, according to a new survey by experts at the University of Exeter.

MPs want academic “match-making” service to help inform policy

MPs have expressed an overwhelming willingness to use a proposed new service to swiftly link them with academics in relevant areas

Roads “a serious threat” to rare bats

Roads present a serious threat to bat populations, indicating that protection policies are failing.

Genetic switch that turned moths black also colours butterflies

The same gene that enables tropical butterflies to mimic each other’s bright and colourful patterning also caused British moths to turn black.

How to organise a cell: novel insight from a fungus

University of Exeter researchers have found novel insight into the ways cells organise themselves.

Stormlamp project to shine light on the impact of waves on lighthouses

Engineers have launched a new research project to examine the structural impact that waves have upon lighthouses.

City birds are less afraid of litter says Exeter researcher

Urban birds are less afraid of litter than their country cousins according to a new study co-authored by a University of Exeter academic.

Exeter engineering expert leads research to pioneer new type of gel for food and home care industries

A materials scientist from the University of Exeter has been awarded a substantial research grant to pioneer a new type of gel.

University of Exeter academic to advise US Government

A University of Exeter expert will advise the US Government and policy makers around the world on warfare after being appointed to a prestigious new role.

ISIS propaganda collected in real time

University of Exeter experts will collect large amounts of propaganda put on the internet by Islamic State terrorists in real time to understand how it radicalises people.

Exeter researchers to lead two major projects on past and future climate change

Scientists at the University of Exeter will be leading two major multi-million pound world-class research projects.

Exercise helps you live longer, evidence shows

Exercise is associated with a longer life in patients with heart failure, according to research by the University of Exeter Medical School.

New £1M facility to reveal the secrets of marine microbial communities one member at a time

University of Exeter and Plymouth Marine Laboratory have unveiled a state of the art facility for the study of environmental microbes.

Too much sex causes genitals to change shape, beetle study shows

Sexual conflict between males and females can lead to changes in the shape of their genitals, according to research on burying beetles.

Pregnant mothers may shield unborn young from damage and risk their own mortality

Mammals can protect their unborn young from harmful chemicals in their blood even at the expense of their own survival odds.

University placed 35th globally in latest influential rankings

The University of Exeter has reinforced its position amongst the leading universities both nationally and internationally, according to the latest influential global rankings.

Citizen science game is “Big Brother for bugs”

A citizen science website game akin to “big brother for crickets” allows participants to take part in important hands-on research using insects.

For cells, some shapes are easier to swallow than others

Scientists have probed the process that allows cells to swallow up particles, finding that some shapes are easier to swallow than others.

Tiny ocean organism has big role in climate regulation

Scientists have discovered that a tiny, yet plentiful, ocean organism is playing an important role in the regulation of the Earth’s climate.

Exeter launches Extreme Medicine Masters programme

Masters programme to equip healthcare professionals to practise medicine in the world’s most remote and challenging environments has been launched.

Survey aims to understand why South West GPs are leaving their jobs

A new research project sets out to understand why some GPs are leaving their jobs to take early retirement or career breaks.

Mysterious mounds created by earthworms

Mysterious spectacular mounds found in the earth in tropical wetlands in South America are created by earthworms, researchers have found.

Conservation laws need reshaping to protect sea turtles, research finds

Researchers call for socio-economic influences to be factored into future protection policies

Medical School researchers recognised among UK’s best

The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) has recognised another researcher at the University of Exeter Medical School.

Pint of Science Exeter to take local science breakthroughs to city pubs

Experts from the University of Exeter and the Met Office will bring their research out of the laboratory and into city watering holes.

Exeter teams celebrate success at the British Medical Journal Awards

Two Exeter teams have been recognised for excellence in healthcare and research at the coveted British Medical Journal (BMJ) Awards in London on 5th May.

Exeter marine plastics expert to advise parliamentary select committee

A University of Exeter expert on marine pollution will be giving advice to a cross-party committee of MPs at the Palace of Westminster in London today (Monday).

Dementia researchers tell their story on BBC’s Horizon

Researchers from the University of Exeter will appear on BBC Two’s flagship science strand Horizon this week.

Researchers win major grant to lead Indian water management project

Three engineering experts from Exeter have been awarded £334,000 to participate in an international partnership project enhancing the management of water resources in South Asia.

A new mobile phone app for grassroots mapping

Exeter academics have created an app which could help aid humanitarian rescue work in disaster-struck regions by using geographic data to map landscapes.

Air power now weapon of choice

Air power has become the weapon of choice for Western politicians because it causes maximum destruction with the minimum of commitment.

Influence of sea-ice loss on Arctic warming is shaped by varying temperatures in the Pacific Ocean

The crucial role that sea-ice loss plays in rapid Arctic warming is regulated by variable climate patterns taking place in the Pacific Ocean, a pioneering new study has found.

£100,000 grants for two medical research leaders of the future

Two talented researchers from the University of Exeter have each been awarded £100k to further their work.

Researcher gives evidence on young adult offenders in wake of deaths

A neuropsychologist from the University of Exeter called for better treatment of young adults when giving evidence to an influential parliamentary inquiry yesterday.

Working with music groups to improve recovery for people with aphasia

Health researchers are working to bring together people who have communication problems caused by aphasia.

Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy helps prevent depression recurrence

The largest meta-analysis so far of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) for recurrent depression has found that MBCT is an effective treatment option.

Commuters set to take front seat in new project to cut traffic congestion

Commuters are set to become the driving force behind a new initiative designed to help reduce traffic congestion in and around Exeter.

Researchers find significant greening on Earth

There has been an increase in leaves on plants and trees on the Earth equivalent in area to two times the continental USA, a new study shows.

Exeter researchers in celebrity-endorsed research to save swans

Researchers at the University of Exeter’s Penryn Campus are involved in a pioneering project to safeguard Europe’s smallest swan.

Exeter scientists call on public to look and listen out for cuckoos

Devon residents are being asked to record cuckoos seen or heard in the county as part of an ongoing conservation project.

£2m centre linking maths and medicine will transform healthcare

A pioneering new research centre will celebrate its official launch this month.

New trial aims to prevent type 1 diabetes

A clinical study evaluating a new hypothesis that an inexpensive drug with a simple treatment regimen can prevent type 1 diabetes has been launched in Dundee.

Mysteries of Shakespeare’s grave uncovered

A University of Exeter expert will describe his fascinating work to unlock the secrets of Shakespeare’s grave at an event held to mark 400 years since the playwright’s death.

New insights into how the brain adapts to stress

New research has found that genes in the brain that play a crucial role in behavioural adaptation to stressful challenges are controlled by epigenetic mechanisms.

Blood pressure difference linked to heart disease risk

Blood pressure differences between each arm can signal an increased risk of dying of heart disease, even in healthy people, a new large-scale study has found.

University of Exeter part of £13million mental health biomarker study

Researchers from the University of Exeter are involved in a major European £13.3 million funding initiative which aims to unpick the biological reasons underlying social withdrawal.

Improving the lives of coastal communities in Central Africa

University of Exeter experts will work to improve the livelihoods of coastal communities and conserve marine life in Central Africa.

 

New laboratories to preserve precious artefacts for the future

University of Exeter experts will be able to examine and preserve important historical objects thanks to a new £1.2m Digital Humanities research space.

Divers and researchers help protect UK reef habitats

Divers and experts are calling for more action to protect biodiversity-rich UK rocky reefs for the future.

Mediterranean loggerhead turtles dying in waters off the Middle East and North Africa

Thousands of loggerhead turtles are killed annually in areas of Syria, Libya and Egypt and Tunisia where they travel to find food.

North Atlantic played pivotal role in last great climate tipping point, research shows

The North Atlantic Ocean played a key role in the last great tipping point in Earth’s climate system, pioneering new research has shown.

Transatlantic link to help protect the environment

University of Exeter experts will collaborate with colleagues in the USA to work to protect our environment.

Student represents Medical School in Vienna

A University of Exeter Medical School student has presented his research at a prestigious event in Vienna.

Exeter-Eden garden exhibit opens

An exciting research initiative culminates at the Eden Project this week, with the opening of a new exhibit in the attraction’s outdoor gardens.

‘Ask the Experts’ about the EU referendum at the University of Exeter

Leading experts will be able to help people make an informed decision as they decide how to cast their vote in the UK’s referendum at an event in Exeter.

Green light stops sea turtle deaths

Illuminating fishing nets is a cost-effective means of dramatically reducing the number of sea turtles getting caught and dying unnecessarily.

Changes to environment helps protect young pheasants

Making changes to the early lives of young pheasants can help prevent them dying needlessly, University of Exeter researchers have found.

Personality traits can be revealed by movement, study shows

A pioneering new study has revealed how an individual’s movement can give a unique insight into their inherent personality traits.

Risk of multiple tipping points should be triggering urgent global action on climate change

To avoid multiple climate tipping points, policy makers need to act now to stop global CO2 emissions by 2050.

New study to investigate impact of lobbying

Experts will investigate whether wealthy individuals and groups really do control political decisions as part of a new study.

‘Intelligent’ robotic boat piloted by Exeter researchers makes maiden voyage

Researchers from the University of Exeter will be launching a boat with its own intelligence off the Scottish coast this week to test their pioneering software design that could revolutionise data collection at sea.

Female animals look drab to avoid sexual harassment, study shows

A new explanation for why female animals are usually less colourful and decorated than their male counterparts has been suggested by scientists from the University of Exeter – it could be to avoid sexual harassment.

UK Government recognises world-leading strengths of GW4-led consortium

A GW4-led consortium of businesses and organisations from across South West England and South East Wales has been selected to take part in the first wave of the Department for Business.

Pregnant mother’s weight, glucose and blood pressure affect baby’s size

Being overweight or obese in pregnancy causes babies to be born larger, according to new research.

House of Commons showcase for University of Exeter dementia research

University of Exeter research which can help people living with early-stage dementia to manage their everyday lives and remain independent will be showcased by politicians at the House of Commons.

Unique images kept for future generations

Valuable and irreplaceable historic images will now be conserved in the UK thanks to a major European heritage project run at the University of Exeter.

Trainee surgeon completes University’s first MD research degree

A joint project between the University of Exeter Medical School and Physics department has awarded its first Doctor of Medicine (MD).

Global farming practices must change, say climate change researchers

Human activities such as farming have caused the world’s plants, animals and microbes to contribute to global warming, a major international study co- authored by a University of Exeter professor has found.

Self-harming youngsters put at risk by ‘cycle of shame’

Young people who self-harm only seek emergency hospital care as a last resort due to a deep sense of shame and unworthiness, a study at the University of Exeter has found.  

Real-life aliens extremely efficient at turning their hosts into new parasites

The way parasitoid wasps feed may be gruesome, but it is an extremely efficient way to exploit prey, University of Exeter research has found.

Short man or overweight woman? Your size could make you poorer

Scientists at the University of Exeter have found the most robust evidence yet that simply being a shorter man or a more overweight woman leads to lower chances in life, including a lower income.

University expertise key in “treasure” inquest

University of Exeter expertise has helped uncover the origins of treasure found by a metal detector on Devon farmland.

Exeter physicist takes research to Parliament

A University of Exeter researcher has been selected from thousands of competitors to present his research to MPs and expert judges at the House of Parliament, on Monday March 7.

'Global Conversation' takes key issue of protecting oceans to Hong Kong

The latest research on the importance of marine biodiversity to global issues will be shared by leading experts from the University of Exeter at a special event in Hong Kong.

Beetles assert dominance by being a lover not a fighter, new research shows

Beetles that demonstrate same-sex sexual behaviour may be asserting dominance over rival males without having to resort to fighting, a new study has shown.

The overlooked commotion of particle motion in the ocean

Most aquatic species sense sound via particle motion, yet few studies on underwater acoustic ecology have included measurements of particle motion.

Dementia: “illness” label can lower mood

People who perceive dementia symptoms as an illness feel more negative than those who see it as an inevitable part of getting older, a new study indicates.

Intense competition for reproduction results in violent mass evictions

Intense levels of reproductive competition trigger violent evictions of male and female banded mongooses from their family groups, University of Exeter researchers have found.

New research helps solve the riddle of the ocean carbon conundrum

About a quarter of the carbon dioxide we release each year into the atmosphere ends up in the ocean, but how it happens is still not fully understood.

£1.5 million to train tomorrow’s scientists and engineers

The Government is investing £1.5 million in the University of Exeter, to train the next generation of innovators in physical science subjects.

Plankton faeces could move plastic pollution to the ocean depths

Plastic waste could find its way deep into the ocean through the faeces of plankton, new research from the University of Exeter and Plymouth Marine Laboratory shows.

New vaccine could save thousands of lives

Work led by University of Exeter experts could help to protect thousands of people from an often fatal disease found in most tropical regions.

Lower limit for future climate emissions needed, research says

The world can emit even less greenhouse gases than previously estimated if global warming is to be kept under control, a new study co-authored by a University of Exeter mathematician has found.

South West MEP celebrates success of University of Exeter EU-funded projects

South West MEP Clare Moody has met pioneering University of Exeter experts who are helping to boost economic growth and create jobs in the region.

Exeter student wins £1000 prize for pioneering plastics research project

A University of Exeter student has won a top £1,000 research award for her pioneering work into plankton and plastic.

Archaeology project will uncover Exeter’s hidden secrets

Secrets from Exeter’s past will be fully uncovered for the first time as part of a major archaeology project.

Exeter experts receive €700,000 grant to study the future security of water, food and energy provision

Researchers from the University of Exeter are leading a pioneering international research project to deliver new guidance for governments to safeguard long-term provision of crucial natural resources.

More hands-on training for doctors required if policy changes

Research into views on whether doctors should be fully registered to practise on graduation has highlighted scope for improvements in the medical education training system.

Deception and trickery are rife in natural world, scientist says in new book

A University of Exeter academic is the author of a new book that describes how animals and plants use ingenuity and cunning to exploit and mislead one another in order to survive and reproduce.

New inquiry into the cost, value and quality of teacher education and medical education

A major new inquiry run by academics at the University of Exeter could inform Government policy about the education of thousands of new teachers and doctors in England.

Gene could help identify psychosis risk in cannabis users

Researchers have identified a gene which can be used to predict how susceptible a young person is to the mind-altering effects of smoking cannabis.

New funding to develop cutting edge medical research ideas

The University of Exeter has received a slice of £23.2 million in Government funding for cutting-edge medical research to ensure academics can work with industry and that their research transforms medical care.

Scientists - Think more broadly to predict wildlife climate change survival

Scientists studying whether species can adapt to climate change should not simply focus on how far they can move, says a conservation biologist at the University of Exeter.

Exeter Expert outlines global water engineering research success

New technology developed by University of Exeter academics to detect water leaks has helped more than seven million people, according to a water expert.

Catastrophic failure of South American ice age dam changed Pacific Ocean circulation and climate

Research could help scientists understand potential effects of melting ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica.

Exeter’s world-leading climate change research showcased in prestigious science event

University of Exeter research into the impact of climate change will be featured at a prestigious science event in the USA, held this week.

Mathematician awarded £300,000 to study movement of wildebeest, reindeer and salmon

A University of Exeter mathematician has been awarded more than £300,000 ($450,000) to study collective behaviour and decision-making patterns in animals in the wild.

Childhood diabetes discoveries could lead to new treatments

Children who are diagnosed with diabetes before the age of seven develop a more aggressive form of the disease than that seen in teenagers, new research has revealed.

Motorboat noise gives predators a deadly advantage

The rate that fish are captured by predators can double when boats are motoring nearby, according to pioneering work led by a University of Exeter marine biologist.

Bee virus spread manmade and emanates from Europe

The spread of a disease that is decimating global bee populations is manmade, and driven by European honeybee populations, new research has concluded.

Computer models deliver stroke care boost to South West

People who have had a stroke in Devon are receiving faster and more effective treatment thanks to research that has used the latest advances in computer simulation.

Stress in fish from noise may be short-lived, new research shows

Two commercially important fish species can rapidly recover from stress attributed to short-term exposure to man-made underwater noise pollution, new research has shown.

Extreme weather threatens Britain’s coastline

Britain’s rocky coastline is being reshaped and eroded by the increasingly common extreme weather, University of Exeter researchers have found.

New research to protect cities now and in the future

New work by University of Exeter experts will enable better management of urban services affected by climate change-related hazards.

New technique to find copper deposits

A University of Exeter geologist has developed a new and relatively inexpensive way to establish whether certain types of magmatic rocks are more likely to contain valuable metal deposits.

Competition between mothers starts in the womb, new study suggests

Female mammals, including humans, may try to outcompete one another by producing bigger babies, ground-breaking research conducted by scientists at the University of Exeter has suggested.

'Global Conversation' takes key issue of climate change to London

The latest research on the impact of climate change on global issues including security, flooding, migration and risk of conflict will be shared by leading Exeter experts at a special event in London.

Exeter psychologist wins prestigious awards

A University of Exeter psychologist has been given three prestigious prizes for his work to further understanding of how the human mind regulates behaviour.

Camouflage really does reduce the chances of being eaten

A ground-breaking study has confirmed the long held assumption that camouflage protects animals from the clutches of predators.

Climate change may have had a huge impact on ancient South American civilisations

Climate change may have brought huge disruption to ancient South American societies before Europeans arrived in 1492, University of Exeter academics have discovered.

Cornwall’s researchers lead €6m investigation into ‘Blue Health’

A new €6 million research project launches this month, aiming to shed light on how coasts and rivers affect the health of populations across Europe.

Exeter researcher awarded 1000th Leverhulme Fellowship

A leading behavioural ecologist from the University of Exeter has become the 1,000th researcher to receive a national fellowship for her pioneering research contributions in the field of social evolution and animal behaviour.

Exeter expert named in top 25 leaders in worldwide water industry

An engineering expert from the University of Exeter has been named among the top 25 industry leaders worldwide.

Study of violent decolonisation may provide lessons about insurgency today

A new study which examines the causes and consequences of anti-colonial violence following the Second World War may offer insights into current conflicts today in the Middle East and elsewhere.

Lizards camouflage themselves by choosing rocks that best match the colour of their backs

New research shows wild Aegean wall lizards found on Greek islands choose to sit on rocks that better match their individual colouring.

Flood expert helps create winning flood awareness app

A team featuring a flood expert from the University of Exeter’s Centre for Water Systems (CWS)  has claimed first prize for the creation of an app that will aid global flood management and help save lives

Tagging project confirms Sea of the Hebrides importance to basking sharks

A pioneering three-year project to learn some of the secrets of Scotland’s basking sharks by using satellite tag technology has shown an area off the west coast to be truly important for these giant fish.

Original art from British graphic novels on display

More than a hundred pieces of original art from British graphic novels will be on show as part of a new University of Exeter research project.

Vice-Chancellor joins new Social Mobility Advisory Group

Professor Sir Steve Smith, Vice-Chancellor and Chief Executive of the University of Exeter, will play a key role in new high profile advisory group aimed at improving social mobility within the higher education sector.

Land management could help wildlife beat the challenges brought by climate change

The harmful effects of climate change on wildlife habitats can been counteracted by localised land management, a new research paper has suggested.

Video game principles used to enhance exhibits at Exeter museum

Pioneering work by a University of Exeter researcher will see the principles behind video games used to expand what visitors to the city’s Royal Albert Memorial Museum & Art Gallery (RAMM) can learn and see.

Easier diagnosis for fungal infection of the lungs

New clinical imaging method may enable doctors to tackle one of the main killers of patients with weakened immune systems sooner and more effectively.

Collaboration to improve child mental health

A University of Exeter Medical School Professor is involved in a project to bring together specialists to find solutions to improve mental health services for school children across the country.

Promiscuity could reduce benefits of successful mating, research shows

Mating with a large number of partners may not be as good an indicator of success as it appears, new research has shown.

People with dementia gain from learning self-management skills

People with early-stage dementia benefit when they are empowered to manage their own condition, a study led by researchers at the University of Exeter has found.

Exeter receives outstanding rating for its Teach First programme

Outstanding teacher training programmes run by the University of Exeter and Teach First are helping to supply effective teachers in areas of social and economic disadvantage.

New study gives squirrels plenty of food for thought

The age-old adage that ‘practice makes perfect’ has been found to illustrate how the humble grey squirrel solves problems in the search for food.

Rewilding, wellbeing and return of lynx in spotlight at Exeter

Rewilding the United Kingdom – from restored forests to the return of predators such as the lynx – were in the spotlight at a topical lecture. 

Beat the January blues with food, say Exeter researchers

If you are prone to the January blues after an over-indulgent festive season, you could help researchers at the University of Exeter discover whether healthy eating can ward off depression.

Exeter study offers free online depression therapy

In January, the most depressing month of the year, researchers are urging people to take up free therapy courses in a bid to help them find a definitive answer to what works best in online treatment for depression.

Media coverage focusing on slim majority of the Conservative Party influences voter perceptions

Voters who read media reports highlighting the slim Parliamentary majority of the Conservative Party are less likely to believe Prime Minister David Cameron can have an impact on their lives.

Mothers’ comments linked to eating disorders in Asian young adults

Study to look at the influence of Asian parents on their young adult child’s body dissatisfaction levels and disordered eating in Singapore.

Migrant values adapt over just one generation

Migrants’ thinking styles and social values rapidly shift over a single generation to become more similar to those of the wider society they have moved into, new research has indicated.

Pioneering study to help adults delay frailty and live independently for longer

A major study, involving researchers from the University of Exeter, has launched aiming to help older people stay fitter and live independently for longer.

Research indicates most accurate picture yet of how the Amazon will respond to climate change

Research indicates most accurate picture yet of how the Amazon will respond to climate change.

Dementia: new insights into causes of loss of orientation

New research has revealed how disease-associated changes in two interlinked networks within the brain may play a key role in the development of the symptoms of dementia.

Exeter scientist secures prestigious award

A University of Exeter scientist has been honoured by the Royal Astronomical Society (RAS) for his ground-breaking research.

Small males have more sex appeal, new research shows

Female burying beetles are more attracted to small partners because they are less likely to get into fights, a study by researchers at the University of Exeter has found.

Updated app will boost Ménière’s research

Research into Ménière’s Disease is getting a big boost this week, with the release of a newly updated tool to record and analyse symptoms.

£2M grant to reduce major aquaculture diseases

The University of Exeter and the Centre for the Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Sciences (Cefas) are leading on a £1.97M BBSRC-Newton Fund project.

People face subconscious urges to over-eat at this time of year

People have evolved to have subconscious urges to over-eat, and limited ability to avoid becoming obese, especially in winter, a University of Exeter study has found.

Exeter Professor tops TEDx YouTube Channel playlist

A talk given by the University of Exeter’s Professor Michelle Ryan for the 2015 TEDxExeter talk series has been viewed nearly 70,000 times in the past six months, and tops a recent international compilation of TEDx talks on the way we work.

A far from perfect host

Biologists at the universities of Exeter and York have published new research which shows that an ancient symbiosis is founded entirely on exploitation, not mutual benefit.

Changing the use of agricultural land could massively reduce greenhouse gas emissions

Making farmland more productive could bring about significant reductions in the UK’s greenhouse gas emissions, University of Exeter research has found.

Exeter scientists call for reduction in plastic lab waste

Three researchers at the University of Exeter are calling for action to cut down on the five and a half million tonnes of plastic being generated globally in the course of scientific research.

Crows caught on camera fashioning special hook tools

Scientists have been given an extraordinary glimpse into how wild New Caledonian crows make and use ‘hooked stick tools’ to hunt for insect prey.

University of Exeter research explains the worldwide variation in plant life-histories

A “window on the tree of life” created by a team which includes a University of Exeter researcher is helping to explain the worldwide variation in plant life-histories.

Better understanding of hybrid warfare needed, University of Exeter academic warns

It is essential that the UK and allied nations gain a better understanding of the legal challenges posed by new methods of warfare.

Clinical Psychology at University of Exeter celebrates 40th anniversary

Exeter’s internationally-renowned Clinical Psychology training programme celebrated its 40th anniversary, with a gathering of 100 leading psychologists, alumni and staff.

Depression therapy research makes waves in top 100

A University of Exeter- led study has been ranked as among the most shared and discussed academic research of 2015.

Exeter scientist secures prestigious award for mental health research

A University of Exeter scientist has been awarded a Distinguished Investigator Award by the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, a US charity that funds research into the causes of mental illness.

New Exeter research boosts antibiotic hope

Research carried out at the University of Exeter has advanced understanding of how some damaging bacteria behave and may pave the way for new and more targeted antibiotics.

Phytoplankton like it hot: Warming boosts biodiversity and photosynthesis in phytoplankton

Warmer temperatures increase biodiversity and photosynthesis in phytoplankton, researchers at the University of Exeter and Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have found.

Baby fish will be lost at sea in acidified oceans

The ability of baby fish to find a home, or other safe haven, to grow into adulthood will be severely impacted under predicted ocean acidification, academics have found.

Growth potential remains at risk on even the most remote coral reefs

Coral reefs in the Indian Ocean that were severely damaged by a global warming event 17 years ago have bounced back to optimum health.

Outstanding researcher recognised through fellowship

A Senior Research Fellow at the University of Exeter Medical School has been awarded a Fellowship from the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy in recognition of her excellence in research, education and partnership working.

MPs and peers live far longer than UK average

Members of Parliament and Lords are likely to live far longer than the UK average, according to research involving the University of Exeter.

Exeter professor named in mining top 100

A professor at Camborne School of Mines, based at the University of Exeter’s Penryn campus, has been named one of the world’s most inspiring women in mining.

Volcanic event caused ice age during Jurassic Period, new research suggests

Pioneering new research has shed new light on the causes behind an ‘ice-age’ that took place on Earth around 170 million years ago.

New consortium drives forward congestion-busting project for Exeter

Experts from the University of Exeter are taking part in a new initiative that will put the city at the heart of intelligent use of data to cut traffic jams.

Science for managing climate change risks across Europe under the microscope

An exploration into how science can manage climate change risks across Europe will be presented by an expert from the University of Exeter at the world’s largest climate change talks.

Study uses ‘evidence maps’ to signpost conservation research

Researchers have used a new technique to ensure research findings in the field of nature conservation are more visible and accessible.

Exeter leads the way in prevention of suicides

Researchers at the University of Exeter have developed a new practice resource for local authority public health teams in England, which will help them take action to prevent suicides in public places.

Victorians exposed to fine art through Christmas cards

Designers of Christmas cards used fine art on their products to divert attention away from concerns that the festival was becoming too commercialised.

How to teach Christmas: A new approach to primary Religious Education

New teaching resources that use cartoon characters to teach Religious Education in primary schools are being rolled out in time to explain the story of Christmas to children across the country.

Immediate and aggressive action needed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, study says.

Greenhouse gas emissions must be reduced aggressively and immediately because there are significant constraints to large-scale deployment of negative emissions technologies in the future, new research has shown.

Scientists and fiction writers unite for sleep anthology

Scientists from the University of Exeter have joined forces with storytellers to explore the link between sleep and fiction in a new book about the science of sleep.

Free online course: how genomics are transforming diabetes care

A free online course led by world-renowned experts at the University of Exeter will offer participants the opportunity to explore how developments in the field of genomics are transforming knowledge and treatment of conditions such as diabetes.

£4.6M boost for future biomedical research leaders

GW4 Alliance receives £4.6 million funding for new doctoral training partnership.

Protected area design secrets revealed in new study

It is not only size that matters when planning a protected area, other spatial features such as shape are also critical to the number of animal species found there.

Exeter academic appointed to lead the Arts and Humanities Research Council

Professor Andrew Thompson, Director of the Centre for Global & Imperial History at the University of Exeter, has been appointed as interim Chief Executive of the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC).

Cultural heritage “crucial” to climate change debate

An exploration of the relationship between cultural heritage and climate change is being led by an expert from the University of Exeter at the world’s largest ever climate change talks.

Exeter professor swaps lab bench for backbench

Professor Tamara Galloway from the University of Exeter swapped her lab coat for legislation last week when she visited Exeter MP Ben Bradshaw at the House of Commons for a week in Westminster.

‘Fish fraud’ across Europe in decline, study shows

Tough new policies to combat fish fraud across Europe appear to be working, according to a new study.

World-leading molecular genetics at Exeter celebrates 20 years

The University of Exeter Medical School has celebrated 20 years of molecular genetics research.

Schizophrenia-associated genetic variants affect gene regulation in the developing brain

An international research collaboration has shed new light on how DNA sequence variation can influence gene activity in the developing human brain.

Don’t forget plankton in climate change models, says study

A new study found that phytoplankton - microscopic water-borne plants - can rapidly evolve tolerance to elevated water temperatures.

Exeter researcher wins science outreach competition

A University of Exeter scientist has won the ‘I’m a Scientist: Get me out of here’ competition, beating four other science enthusiasts to the prize.

Strategy and Security experts address Select Committee over Defence Review

Experts from the University of Exeter will appear before the Defence Select Committee on Tuesday, November 24th to give specialist comment on the new Strategic Defence and Security Review (SDSR).

Rice basket study rethinks roots of human culture

A new study from the University of Exeter has found that teaching is not essential for people to learn to make effective tools.

Mountain ranges evolve and respond to Earth’s climate, study shows

Ground-breaking new research has shown that erosion caused by glaciation during ice ages can, in the right circumstances, wear down mountains faster than plate tectonics can build them.

Marine airgun noise could cause turtle trauma

Scientists from the University of Exeter are warning of the risks that seismic surveys may pose to sea turtles.

Half of all Amazonian tree species may be globally threatened

More than half of all tree species in the world’s most diverse forest may be globally threatened, according to a new study.

Study to tackle transient loneliness

Exeter researchers hope a new study will raise awareness of ‘transient loneliness’.

Exeter academic highlights impact of climate change on migration in Europe

Following a summer which has seen huge migration flows into Europe from neighbouring regions, Professor Neil Adger, will speak on the role that climate change plays in the mass movement of people.

Tale of Siberian wilderness solitude filmed

A documentary showcasing the life of a Siberian cut off from society has been captured in a poignant film made with the involvement of a University of Exeter PHD student.

Marine fungi reveal new branches on tree of life

Researchers from the University of Exeter have discovered several new species of marine fungi inhabiting previously undescribed branches of the tree of life.

Many hands make light work and improve health, researchers have found

Getting help with baby care could keep families healthier and extend their lives, according to a new study into bird behaviour.

'Global Conversation' takes key issue of tackling dementia to San Francisco

The crucial issue of how to tackle the challenge of dementia across the global community will be discussed by leading experts in the field, at a special event in San Francisco.

Researchers devise new diabetes diagnostic tool

Researchers at University of Exeter have developed a new test to help diagnose diabetes, which they say will lead to more effective diagnosis and patient care.

Extinction can spread from predator to predator, researchers have found

The extinction of one carnivore species can trigger the demise of fellow predators, conservation biologists at the University of Exeter have confirmed.

A new countryside legacy from Roman Britain

New research from the University of Exeter has found that the Roman influence on our landscape extends beyond the legacy of our urban infrastructure to also shape the countryside and our rural surroundings.

Early farmers exploited beehive products at least 8,500 years ago

Humans have been exploiting bees as far back as the Stone Age, according to new collaborative research involving the University of Exeter that is published in Nature today.

Exeter launches Doctoral College

New world-class Doctoral College aims to enhance the student experience for doctoral research students and early career researchers.

Exeter lead pioneering research into elements crucial for low carbon technologies

The University of Exeter has received high-level funding for crucial research into accessing essential elements needed for a variety of environmental technologies.

Children’s mental health survey launched

The first report on the mental health of young people between the ages of two and 19 will involve an expert researcher from the University of Exeter Medical School.

How best to tackle dangerous climate change: Exeter’s ‘Global Conversation’ comes to New York

The pivotal issue of how best to address perilous global climate change will be discussed by world-leading experts, at a special event in New York.

Improving the mental health of children and young people with long term conditions

A team from the University of Exeter and PenCLAHRC have been awarded a grant of £285,000 to carry out a study aiming to improve ways to support children. 

Intensive farming link to bovine TB

Intensive farming practices have been linked to higher risk of bovine TB, new research has concluded.

‘Global Conversation’ focuses on addressing literacy disadvantage in Canada and the UK

World-leading education experts will gather to discuss how to address the crucial issue of addressing literacy disadvantage in Canada and the UK, at a special event in Toronto.

Spotlight on Black British Theatre

A University of Exeter academic has conceived a documentary on the history of black British theatre and screen, presented by Sir Lenny Henry.

 

Obesity conference aims for better weight loss management in the South West

Experts from across the South West will come together to discuss issues around weight loss management in the region.

World-leading researcher appointed first Director of University of Exeter Living Systems Institute

One of the world’s most pioneering and influential developmental geneticists has been appointed as the inaugural Director of the University of Exeter’s Living Systems Institute.

High stress during pregnancy decreases offspring survival, according to mongoose study

Elevated stress hormones during the later stages of pregnancy can affect pup survival rate.

New guidelines hope to improve decision making

New guidance released this week aims to help authorities make better evidence-based decisions about health and social care.

Exeter climbs up global 100 for Life Sciences

The University of Exeter has cemented its position among the very best universities in the world for Life Sciences.

Professor Fleming receives prestigious award

Professor Lora Fleming received the prestigious Bruun Medal last week, recognising her outstanding work in the field of oceans and human health.

Impactful research shortlisted in-line for national award

A research-driven project which means South West patients with long-term health conditions are getting to see health experts when they need to has been shortlisted by the British Society for Rheumatology in its Best Practice Awards.

Exeter Professor wins prestigious global award

A leading Professor at the University of Exeter has been recognised by receiving the most prestigious European award in her field.

Fellow appointments recognise Social Science excellence

Two leading academics from diverse fields at the University of Exeter have been appointed as Fellows of the Academy of Social Sciences.

Common lizards under threat from climate change

A new study has demonstrated that lizards do not cope well with the climate predicted for the year 2100.

Exeter scientists receive the latest NERC funding for strategic research

University of Exeter researchers are pleased to be among the recipients of the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) highlight topics grants – one of the new ways in which NERC is funding strategic research.

Signs of faster ageing process identified through gene research

New research has shed light on the molecular changes that occur in our bodies as we age.

Flying ants mate close to home and produce inbred offspring

Ant queens stay close to home in their hunt for a mate and as a result produce thousands of inbred offspring, a study led by a University of Exeter biologist has found.

Moth and butterfly species respond differently to climate change

New research shows that certain species of moths and butterflies differ in how they respond to climate change.

Prawns reveal the secrets of innovation

If necessity is the mother invention, who is the mother of necessity?

Exeter projects part of £21 million ‘Engineering Grand Challenges’ research announcement

Three new research programmes, led by or featuring the University of Exeter, that aim to tackle some of the major challenges facing science and engineering have been announced.

Research reveals how global warming will impact Earth’s carbon cycle

New findings reveals how global warming will feedback on the carbon cycle and lead to increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

Greenland’s ice sheet plumbing system revealed

Pioneering new research sheds light on the impact of climate change on subglacial lakes found under the Greenland ice sheet.

Sitting for long periods not bad for health

There’s no harm in sitting down, say researchers

Insight into hypoglycaemia funded by Diabetes UK

Diabetes UK funds research into insulin awareness to help diabetes suffers better recognise hypos

Manage family farms like football clubs to survive in tough world market

Exeter researcher Prof Lobley calls farmers to learn from football clubs

Rare bats win lottery boost

The Devon Greater Horseshoe Bat Project has received a grant via the Heritage Lottery Fund. 

Sea turtles face plastic pollution peril

All seven species of marine turtles can ingest or become entangled in the discarded debris that currently litters the oceans.

Edible love gifts may influence female behaviour, suggests cricket study

Edible gifts given by male crickets to their female partners during mating contain unique proteins which could affect the females’ behaviour.

Cacti among world’s most threatened species

Thirty-one percent of cactus species are threatened with extinction.

Exeter geographer contributes to new exhibition of unique black pigment, Bideford Black

An exhibition at a Devon gallery provides a surprising take on a traditional material. 

University of Exeter joins consortium in major research grant for Cornwall and the South West

Experts from the University of Exeter are part of a consortium that has been awarded funding for a £3m research project from Innovate UK and BBSRC.

University of Exeter achieves global top 100 status in influential rankings

The University of Exeter has broken into the top 100 universities in the world for the first time in the most influential global league table, released today. 

Short, intense exercise bursts can reduce heart risk to teens

Adolescents who perform just eight to ten minutes of high-intensity interval exercise three times a week could be significantly reducing their risk of developing heart conditions, new research has concluded.

Maintaining healthy DNA delays menopause

An international study of nearly 70,000 women has identified more than forty regions of the human genome that are involved in governing at what age a woman goes through the menopause.

Can food affect your mood? Researchers call for participants to take part in MoodFood trial

Researchers from the University of Exeter are seeking participants for a trial into whether certain types of food could prevent depression. 

Offshore wind farms could be more risky for gannets than previously thought, study shows

Offshore wind farms which are to be built in waters around the UK could pose a greater threat to protected populations of gannets than previously thought, according to a new study by researchers at the universities of Leeds, Exeter and Glasgow.

Ocean circulation rethink solves climate conundrum

Researchers from the University of Exeter believe they have solved one of the biggest puzzles in climate science. 

Kenyan actors visit Cornwall to share extreme weather experiences

Researchers at the University of Exeter’s Penryn Campus will today welcome actors from Kenyan charity, S.A.F.E. Kenya.

Research is transforming treatment of long-term conditions

South West patients with long-term health conditions are getting to see health experts when they need to, in an exciting project driven by research.

Cancer paper wins “Research Paper of the Year”

A research paper published in 2014 by the University of Exeter, working with researchers from the University of Bristol’s Centre for Academic Primary Care and Cambridge University, has won Research Paper of the Year Award 2014 from the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP).

University of Exeter contributes to new underwater noise monitoring network

Underwater noise in the marine environment is the focus of a new UK-wide research partnership.

Passion for the Devonshire coast reignited with new project

The University of Exeter and Bath Spa University have joined forces to revive public interest in the natural history of the Devonshire coast. 

Beetroot juice improves sprinting and decision-making during exercise

Rugby players take note: drinking high nitrate beetroot juice improves both sprint performance and decision-making during prolonged intermittent exercise such as rugby and football, according to scientists from the University of Exeter.

Exeter UK’s top university for sport and best in the South West

The University of Exeter has retained its top ten place in the Times and The Sunday Times Good University Guide, and has been named Sports University of the Year 2015-2016.

Satellite technology puts ‘mussel’ into shellfish monitoring

University of Exeter researchers are working with a team of UK scientists to explore the use of satellites and meteorological data to monitor and forecast water quality 

Dr Hadwen Trust (DHT) announces funding to University of Exeter Medical School’s Professor Lorna Harries for diabetes research project

The Dr Hadwen Trust (DHT) has announced funding for a diabetes research project to be led by University of Exeter Medical School’s Professor Lorna Harries.

Spotlight on Red Cross humanitarian ethos on its 50th anniversary

The Fundamental Principles which are central to the global humanitarian ethos of the International Red Cross Red Crescent movement will be analysed at a conference organised jointly by the International Committee of the Red Cross, the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the University of Exeter.

First glimpse of rare Peruvian animals revealed in extraordinary camera trap footage

A series of remarkable new camera trap videos has revealed some of the first ever footage of rare Peruvian animals.

Historical data hold secrets of one of UK’s favourite fish

UK fisheries survey logbooks from the 1930s to 1950s have been digitised for the first time, revealing how cod responded to changing temperatures in the last century.

Urgent research needed on predicting future regional climate change, report demands

Crucial research into the changing spatial patterns of future climate patterns is urgently needed, a new review article has concluded.

Butterfly wings help break the status quo in gas sensing

The unique properties found in the stunning iridescent wings of a tropical blue butterfly could hold the key to developing new highly selective gas detection sensors.

Fishermen discards could increase prevalence of turtle disease in the Turks and Caicos Islands

Fishermen in the Turks and Caicos Islands could be increasing the local prevalence of a disease that is affecting turtle populations worldwide, by selectively harvesting healthy creatures and throwing back infected animals.

Sea temperature changes linked to mystery North Pacific ecosystem shifts

Longer, less frequent climate fluctuations may be contributing to abrupt and unexplained ecosystem shifts in the North Pacific, according to a study by the University of Exeter.

Scientists in Cornwall turn to seaweeds in search for new drugs

Pioneering research in Cornwall is hoping to discover new ways of searching for antibiotics – from the seaweeds found along the county’s coastline.

New partnership will help manage Cornwall’s environment

An exciting new partnership in Cornwall is hoping to use academic research to inform the management of the county’s world-class natural habitats.

Can’t count sheep? You could have aphantasia

If counting sheep is an abstract concept, or you are unable to visualise the faces of loved ones, you could have aphantasia – a newly defined condition to describe people who are born without a “mind’s eye”.

Persist and shout: Male bluebirds alter their songs to be heard over increased acoustic noise levels

Birds ‘shout’ to be heard over the noise produced by man-made activity, new research has shown.

Police and University join forces to harness research potential

A new research project will unite police and researchers to increase evidence-based knowledge, skills and problem solving approaches within policing.

Genomic testing triggers a diabetes diagnosis revolution

Over a 10 year period, the time that babies receive genetic testing after being diagnosed with diabetes has fallen from over four years to under two months.

Humans responsible for demise of gigantic ancient mammals

Early humans were the dominant cause of the extinction of a variety of species of giant beasts, new research has revealed.

Here’s looking at you: research shows jackdaws can recognise individual human faces

Wild jackdaws recognise individual human faces and may be able to tell whether or not predators are looking directly at them.

Sediment dwelling creatures at risk from nanoparticles in common household products

Researchers from the University of Exeter highlight the risk that engineered nanoparticles released from masonry paint on exterior facades, and consumer products such as zinc oxide cream, could have on aquatic creatures.

Newly identified tadpole disease found across the globe

Scientists have found that a newly identified and highly infectious tadpole disease is found in a diverse range of frog populations across the world.

Colour changing sand fleas flummox predatory birds

Sand fleas have a remarkable ability to change colour in order to match dramatically different backgrounds.

Severe droughts could lead to widespread losses of butterflies by 2050

Widespread drought-sensitive butterfly population extinctions could occur in the UK as early as 2050 according to a new study.

Animal-eye view of the world revealed with new visual software

New camera technology that reveals the world through the eyes of animals has been developed by University of Exeter researchers. 

Exeter entrepreneurs on track for national success

A pioneering student entrepreneur support programme has been shortlisted for a prestigious national award.

Crop pests outwit climate change predictions en route to new destinations

Researchers highlight the dangers of relying on climate-based projections of future crop pest distributions.

Researchers call for Crediton residents to pool flood info

Crediton residents have so far provided a wealth of information about flooding vulnerabilities around the town.

Funding awarded to develop 85 year weather forecast

Researchers have been awarded a £1m grant to create a time series of predicted hourly weather from now until 2100, to better understand how building designs interact with different weather conditions.

New research finds aquariums deliver health and wellbeing benefits

People who spend time watching aquariums and fish tanks could see improvements in their physical and mental wellbeing, according to new research published in the journal Environment & Behavior.

Free online therapy for depression offered as part of exciting new research trial

Researchers from the University of Exeter have launched a large-scale research study to improve understanding of treatments that are currently offered to people with depression. 

Prestigious award for world-leading diabetes professor

An outstanding diabetes expert at the University of Exeter Medical School has been recognised through a prestigious Royal Society prize.

Sleep makes our memories more accessible, study shows

Sleeping not only protects memories from being forgotten, it also makes them easier to access, according to new research from the University of Exeter and the Basque Centre for Cognition, Brain and Language.

Selfishness lasts a lifetime, according to mongoose study

Researchers studying wild banded mongooses in Uganda have discovered that these small mammals have either cooperative or selfish personalities which last for their entire lifetime. 

Exeter scientist planning to send microscopic worms into space

A University of Exeter scientist is set to send thousands of microscopic worms on a mission to the International Space Station (ISS) in an experiment aimed at increasing our understanding of what triggers the body to build and lose muscle.  

Large-scale trial will assess effectiveness of teaching mindfulness in UK schools

A major Wellcome Trust study to assess whether mindfulness training for teenagers can improve their mental health launches today.

Surfing for science

Scientists from the University of Exeter and Plymouth Marine Laboratory (PML) plan to use surfers to monitor the coastal environment.

Brawling badgers age faster

Research reveals the strain of living with competitive males

Future looks gloomy for Robben Island penguins

Fish feast boosts penguin numbers.

Topping-out milestone in £52.5 million research development

A topping-out ceremony has marked a major milestone in the construction of a new £52.5 million facility at The University of Exeter.

Study shows grey squirrels are quick learners

A new study from the University of Exeter has shown that grey squirrels are quick learners capable of adapting tactics to improve efficiency and reap the best rewards.

Exeter bioscientist awarded prestigious European Research Council Consolidator Grant

Dr Ivana Gudelj from Biosciences has been awarded a European Research Council (ERC) Consolidator Grant worth €2 million over the next 5 years.

Romeo and Juliet roles for banded mongooses

Mongooses take life-threatening risks to mate with partners from rival groups.

Scientists warn of species loss due to man-made landscapes

Study found 35% fewer bird species in agricultural habitats.

Genetic switch detects TNT

Cleaning-up post-war explosive chemicals could get cheaper and easier, using a new genetic ‘switch’ device.

Devon pupils lead citizen science on plastic

Young people will take part in a unique outreach project in which they will lead and participate in a scientific research project on chemicals in plastic food packaging.

Simple classroom measures may reduce the impact of ADHD

But more robust research is needed to identify best approach.

Key element of human language discovered in bird babble

New study deciphers bird sounds to reveal language precursors in babbler birds

Humans across the world dance to the same beat

Study reveals a common beat in global music

Pesticide study shows that sexual conflict can maintain genetic variation

New research from the University of Exeter has shown that the sexually antagonistic gene for resistance to the pesticide DDT helps to maintain genetic variation. 

Think you know your cat? New study suggests not

Study finds pet owners reluctant to face up to their cats’ kill count

Online computer game can help shed weight and reduce food intake

A simple new computerised game could help people control their snacking impulses and lose weight.

Awards recognise Medical School researchers among UK’s best

The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) has recognised researchers at the University of Exeter Medical School as being among the most outstanding health researchers in the UK.

Exeter expertise helps underpin new cancer guidelines

Research by the University of Exeter has helped underline new national guidelines to help GPs diagnose cancer earlier, and save lives.

Study concludes that racehorses are getting faster

A new study from the University of Exeter has found that racehorses are getting quicker

Minister for Universities and Science visits University of Exeter

Jo Johnson MP, the Minister for Universities and Science, has met with key researchers and representatives during a fact-finding visit to the University of Exeter.

Exeter researchers and school pupils track ticks to reveal Lyme disease hotspots

University of Exeter researchers are set to work with local school pupils on a new study to explore the distribution of Lyme disease in the region. 

Report lays bare public priorities for the natural environment

Public views on the challenges facing policy and decision makers to manage the natural environment have been revealed in a major national public dialogue project.

History of Labour Party explored in new book

The current battle for the leadership of the Labour Party is in full swing with televised show downs between the candidates hitting the airwaves.

Queen to honour Exeter education expert with MBE

Debra Myhill, Professor of Education at the University of Exeter has been awarded an MBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours list for her leadership of the Secondary PGCE programme and the Centre for Research in Writing.

Local schools join the fight against bacterial resistance

Researchers from Biosciences will be working closely with school pupils from Newton Abbot College to discover new antibiotics from soil bacteria.

Exeter researchers lead international initiative to face devastating crop disease

Exeter researchers lead international initiative to face devastating crop disease 

Teenagers should exercise like kids to achieve best health outcomes, study shows

As little as two minutes of high-intensity exercise four times a day improves health outcomes in adolescents, but the same amount of moderate-intensity exercise does not reap the same rewards.

Wild mongooses avoid inbreeding with unusual reproductive strategy

Mongooses can discriminate between relatives and non-relatives to avoid inbreeding 

University to host a series of events for national humanities festival

The University of Exeter is hosting a series of events for Being Human 2015, the UK’s only national festival of the humanities.

Scientists and Surfers team up to assess antibiotic resistance risk

World Ocean’s Day --- Scientists in Cornwall are about to begin an innovative study that will shed light on how surfers exposed to human sewage and diffuse pollution in seawater might be affected by antibiotic resistant bacteria.

Grant of £885,000 to fund important food crop research

A Physicist at the University of Exeter has received a substantial grant to help improve the sustainability of commercially valuable crops.

Ladybird colours reveal their toxicity

For one of Britain’s best-loved and colourful group of insects, ladybirds, their colour reveals the extent of their toxicity.

Study reveals largest turtle breeding colony in the Atlantic

The Central African country of Gabon is providing an invaluable nesting ground for a vulnerable species of sea turtle 

Frogs face virus risk in garden ponds

Pond owners are being urged not to use garden chemicals, or to release goldfish into ponds.

Sharing Memories of cinema-going in the 1940s, 50s and 60s

An opportunity to share memories of going to the cinema in the UK during the 1940s, 1950s and 60s is being provided on 13th June at the University of Exeter’s Bill Douglas Cinema Museum between 2pm and 5pm.

New project to help farmers plan succession

A new initiative to help farmers effectively plan who will take over their farms is being announced at the Royal Cornwall Show on 5 June. The University of Exeter’s Centre for Rural Policy in partnership with NFU Mutual, a leading rural insurer, and Cornwall’s Rural Business School have developed the first UK-wide academic study of succession farming. 

Magna Carta experienced through Exeter's medieval law trail

In celebration of the 800th anniversary of the sealing of the Magna Carta a sponsored 10km walk around Exeter’s legal sites on 3 June at 5pm, is being organised by the South West Legal Support Trust with assistance from the University of Exeter’s School of Law and the Devon and Somerset Law Society. 

On the trail of the clever snail

Animals, like humans, excel at some tasks but not others according to a new study published in the journal Scientific Reports

Climate engineering may save coral reefs, study shows

Geoengineering of the climate may be the only way to save coral reefs from mass bleaching, according to new research.

Asian family research answers questions on fatty acid in brain

New research conducted in a rural community in Pakistan highlights the crucial role that essential fatty acids play in human brain growth and function.

University of Exeter scientists receive Epilepsy Research UK research grant

University of Exeter scientists have received grant worth almost £150,000 to fund their crucial research, which could revolutionise epilepsy is diagnosed.

University of Exeter placed 6 in UK, 8 in Europe and 34 globally in latest influential rankings

The CWTS Leiden Ranking 2015, published today, has placed the University of Exeter sixth in the UK, eighth in Europe and top 40 in the world. The University also rose 24 places since 2014 in the overall rankings.

Musical microbes to form part of permanent exhibition at Eden

A unique soundscape created through interpreting the sounds of bacterial molecules in the human body will form part of a new exhibition at the Eden Project.

More than £500,000 to fund dementia research at Exeter

More than half a million pounds of new cutting-edge research which aims to advance us towards a dementia cure and improve dementia care has been awarded to the University of Exeter Medical School by Alzheimer’s Society.

New camera technology reveals body's hidden secrets

A dramatic way of seeing magnified parts of the human body is now possible through cutting edge filming technology. The BREATH project uses extreme slow motion and close up filming techniques to explore the ageing human body as a new landscape.

Study highlights ways to boost weather and climate predictions

Long range weather forecasts and climate change projections could be significantly boosted by advances in our understanding of the relationship between layers of the Earth’s atmosphere - the stratosphere and troposphere.

Research through the arts initiative breaks new ground in Exeter

An Arts Council England funded project called Exeter Enquires aims to engage a wider public in the innovative work and practise of academic-artistic collaboration.

Sign up for health research on Clinical Trials Day

The public will be invited to get involved with medical research and show their love for scientific advances during an event in Exeter to mark International Clinical Trials Day.

Ecosystem management that ignores ‘taboo tradeoffs’ is likely to fail

Research published today recommends a new approach to the difficult tradeoffs that environmental managers face when choosing between environmental sustainability and profitability. 

Mining pollution alters fish genetics in south west England

Pollution from historic mining activities in south west England has led to a reduction in genetic diversity of brown trout.

Suitcases travel around Cornish landmarks

An exciting project that will unearth the stories, traditions and histories connected with landmarks throughout Cornwall has been launched this month.

Increased atmospheric carbon dioxide makes trees use water more efficiently

The increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration has allowed trees across Europe to use their available water resources more efficiently, new research has shown.

Historian contributes to new TV programme on Churchill

A University of Exeter historian is part of a brand new TV programme about Sir Winston Churchill on the Discovery Channel. 

New online resource to explore fashion in Thomas Hardy's writing

A new online facility has been developed by the University of Exeter and Dorset County Museum to catalogue references to clothing in Thomas Hardy’s writing and the time in which he lived.

Grant success for University of Exeter researchers at Cornwall’s Wave Hub

University of Exeter researchers are part of the biodiversity research team of a new EUR 17 million EU Horizon 2020 funded project 

Mine’s a pint…. Of science

A festival which pulls science out of the lab and into the pub is coming to Exeter for the first time.

£3 million research centre will target disease

A new research centre will bring together experts in a diverse range of fields to tackle some of the greatest health issues of our time – and the public are being invited to get involved.

Commercial out-of-hours care providers score on average lower with patients

Patients receiving care from commercial providers of out-of-hours care report poorer ratings of care when compared with not-for-profit or NHS providers, a new study has shown.

Coastal light pollution disturbs marine animals, new study shows

Marine ecosystems can be changed by night-time artificial lighting according to new research.

Elderly crickets are set in their ways, study finds

As insects grow old their behaviour becomes increasingly predictable according to new research.

Male beetles up their game when they catch a whiff of competition

Male flour beetles increase their courtship effort and their sperm count if a female smells of other males according to a study published in the journal Behavioural Ecology.

One percent of tree species in the Amazon forest account for half of its carbon

A new study published in the journal Nature Communications has discovered that fewer than 200 species of Amazonian tree, barely 1%, are responsible for half of all tree growth and carbon stored in the Amazon.

New study shows parrotfish are critical to coral reef island building

Parrotfish, commonly found on healthy coral reefs, can also play a pivotal role in providing the sands necessary to build and maintain coral reef islands.

Childhood Obesity – One Epidemic or Two?

New research has indicated that obesity in children has quite different causes at different ages.

Climate change: how Brits feel about ‘smart’ energy

Reluctance to share data about personal energy use is likely to be a major obstacle when implementing ‘smart’ technologies.

New Zealand stoats provide an ark for genetic diversity

Extinct British genes have been preserved in the stoat population of New Zealand, a new study has found.

Persistent swollen neck glands could indicate cancer

Referring patients with unexplained swollen neck glands for specialist investigations could help to avoid some of the thousands of deaths each year from lymphoma, a type of cancer.

Family becomes first in South West to take part in ground-breaking DNA research

A six-year-old boy and his mum and dad today became the first family in the South West to take part in ground-breaking DNA research at the Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Foundation Trust (RD&E), with support from the University, to help fight rare health conditions.

University of Exeter needs local people to hear or catch sight of a cuckoo

The people of Devon are being urged to get involved in the second phase of a project which is trying to map the movements of cuckoos.

Complex cognition shaped the Stone Age hand axe

New research has shown that the ability to make a Stone Age hand axe depends on complex cognitive control and memory.

Mindfulness-based therapy could offer an alternative to antidepressants for preventing depression relapse

Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) could provide an alternative non-drug treatment for people who do not wish to continue long-term antidepressant treatment.

Spanish Ambassador attends Hispanic conference in Exeter

The University hosted a prestigious visit from the Spanish Ambassador, as part of the 60th anniversary events surrounding the formation of the Association of Hispanists of Great Britain and Ireland.

Warming seas pose habitat risk for fishy favourites

Popular North Sea fish such as haddock, plaice and lemon sole could become less common on our menus because they will be constrained to preferred habitat as seas warm.

Queen of Crime's hidden talents revealed

Solving mysteries is the work of Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple made famous by the creative hand of Agatha Christie; but few are aware of another of the author’s attributes – her astute business sense.

Scientists urge public to take part in final part of health survey

Scientists in Cornwall are making a final appeal for people to take part in research that will shed light on the health effects of marine pollution.

Research shows alternating antibiotics could make resistant bacteria beatable

Pioneering new research has unlocked a new technique to help combat the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, that cause debilitating and often life-threatening human illness.

Magic, Malta and a Muslim during the Inquisition in 1605

Making a living by practising magic can have dramatic consequences, especially if you are a Muslim slave with mainly Christian clients at the time of the Inquisition in early 17th century Malta.

Public urged to report basking shark sightings for new tracking project

The University of Exeter and the Marine Conservation Society are joining forces in an exciting new satellite tracking project to tag and follow basking sharks in Cornish waters.

Discover breadth of health services research at Medical School

An insight into the wide range of research taking place at the University of Exeter Medical School’s Institute of Health Research will be on offer at a series of inaugural lectures which are open to all.

Scientists describe a new alga that may help corals adapt to climate change

Changes in ocean chemistry associated with climate change are exacerbating the global decline of coral reefs.

Biodiversity damage mapped by global land-use study

Humanity’s use of land for agricultural production has come at a cost to local ecosystems worldwide, but some of the damage can be reversed.

Direct evidence for a positive feedback in climate change

A new study has confirmed the existence of a positive feedback operating in climate change whereby warming itself may amplify a rise in greenhouse gases resulting in additional warming.

Expedition studies Indian monsoon’s past to discover future impact of climate change

The quest to discover how future climate change will impact the formidable Indian monsoon phenomenon could find the answer rooted in the prehistoric past.

Short bouts of high-intensity exercise before a fatty meal best for promoting vascular health in youth

A short burst of intensive exercise before eating a high fat meal is better for blood vessel function in young people than the currently recommended moderate-intensity exercise.

Antibiotic resistance risk for coastal water users

Recreational users of coastal waters such as swimmers and surfers are at risk of exposure to antibiotic resistant bacteria, according to new research published this week.

Easter baptism with BBC's Songs of Praise and Exeter theologian

As part of the Easter special on BBC ONE’s religious television programme Songs of Praise, a University of Exeter theologian will be exploring the practice of early Christian baptism and its symbolism of death and resurrection.

Fellowship awards for two outstanding scientists

Two rising research stars at the University of Exeter Medical School have been awarded prestigious Sir Henry Dale Fellowships.

Consent for research participation:Time to change?

A major investigation into the views of volunteers on the consent process for medical research has been found to conflict with the standard practice required for consent in the UK. 

A difficult climate: New study examines the media’s response to the IPCC

A study, published today in the journal Nature Climate Change, has for the first time analysed how Twitter, TV and newspapers reported the IPCC’s climate evidence.

World-leading dementia research team joins the University of Exeter

A global figure in the field of dementia study has joined the University of Exeter to lead a new Centre for Research in Ageing and Cognitive Health (REACH).

Policy makers should not discount the damages from future climate tipping points

Society should set a high carbon tax now to try and prevent climate change reaching a point of no return according to a new study. 

Part-night lighting is ineffective in capturing natural peaks in bat activity

Part-night lighting, a proposed mitigation option to reduce the negative impacts of light pollution, is unlikely to benefit bats, a study published this week confirms.

Devon school children solve genetic riddle

Scandal has erupted on Devon’s sporting scene as previously unknown athletes smash all known records. Police call on the only team who can scrutinise the mysterious yeast found in their bags: The X-Men in White.

Amazon’s carbon uptake declines as trees die faster

The most extensive land-based study of the Amazon to date reveals it is losing its capacity to absorb carbon from the atmosphere.

Light pollution shown to affect plant growth and food webs

Artificial night time light from sources such as street lamps affects the growth and flowering of plants and even the number of insects that depend on those plants for food.

Prestigious award for Exeter genomic medicine expert

A leading light in genetic diabetes research has been awarded a prestigious national award for outstanding scientists.

England's treasured landscapes to benefit from new partnership

A pioneering partnership is being launched to care for some of England’s most beautiful and vulnerable high ground. The Uplands Alliance (UA) brings together for the first time practitioners, researchers and policy makers with interests in the highest areas of land, including treasured landscapes of the Lake District, Yorkshire Dales and Dartmoor.

PhD research celebrated at Medical School showcase

The wide range of research projects undertaken by PhD students at the University of Exeter Medical School was celebrated at a dynamic showcase and networking event.

Love, love me do: male beetles that have more sex are more insecure, study shows

Males that mate more often are more insecure about their social status than those mating less, according to new research on the behaviour of burying beetles.

Old mothers know best: killer whale study sheds light on the evolution of menopause

A new study led by the Universities of Exeter and York has shown that female killer whales survive after menopause because they help their family members find food during hard times. 

Tackling concussion with Exeter Chiefs

Specialists from the University of Exeter are working with Exeter Chiefs Rugby Club on a project to model what happens to the brain of a player when they are concussed in order to improve safety and manage the impact of injuries following head trauma.

First direct evidence that drought-weakened Amazonian forests ‘inhale less carbon’

For the first time, an international research team, including a tropical forest ecologist from the University of Exeter, has provided direct evidence of the rate at which individual trees in the Amazon Basin ‘inhale’ carbon from the atmosphere during a severe drought. 

‘No take zones’ in English Channel would benefit marine wildlife and the fishing industry

Marine conservationists are increasingly pinning their hopes on marine protected areas (MPAs) to save threatened species and reduce over-fishing.

Hormone disrupting chemicals and climate change increase the risk of population-level impacts in wildlife populations

The impact of pollution on wildlife could be made dramatically worse by climate change according to a new study published today in the journal PNAS. 

Black men less willing to be investigated for prostate cancer

The incidence of prostate cancer among men of Afro-Caribbean origin is higher than in white men, they are more likely to be diagnosed as emergencies and their mortality rates are higher. Until now it has been unclear why these disappointing outcomes exist.

Join Dementia Research launched

A new nationwide online and telephone service that helps people in the South West of England to take part in dementia research studies is now live.

Weekend evolution: Bacteria ‘hotwire their genes’ to fix a faulty motor

Scientists have found how simple bacteria can restart their ‘outboard motor’ by hotwiring their own genes.

Study seeks to understand variations in the rate of global warming

A new study has looked at slow-downs in the rate of global surface warming, despite ongoing increases in the emissions of greenhouse gases.

Algae aid corals in their fight against climate change

Corals may be better equipped to tolerate climate change than previously believed, according to research led by the University of Exeter.

#RU2Drunk breathalyser initiative reduced alcohol fuelled crime in Torquay

A scheme to breathalyse suspected drunks trying to get into pubs and clubs in Torquay has seen a 39 per cent drop in violent crime.

Online courts could increase access to justice and reduce costs by 2017

The future of civil law courts is likely to be online according to a new report. The study suggests that it will increase access to justice and streamline the court processes in England and Wales. 

New research finds rivers can be a source of antibiotic resistance

 Rivers and streams could be a major source of antibiotic resistance in the environment.

Study seeks to understand Amazonia's past to ensure its sustainable future

A new international project led by the University of Exeter will investigate the Amazon’s sustainable future by studying the way that ancient societies used and transformed the environment.

Night skies brightest in human history

Artificial sky glow around the world has been quantified for the first time by researchers using a global network of sky quality monitors.

Plain packaging reduces ‘cigarette-seeking’ response by almost a tenth, says study

Plain tobacco packaging may reduce the likelihood of smokers seeking to obtain cigarettes by almost 10% compared to branded packs, according to research from the Universities of Exeter and Bristol.

Skeletons uncovered at Ipplepen reveals major Roman cemetery

15 ancient skeletons have been discovered on an archaeological dig in Ipplepen, a major Romano-British settlement in Devon and now the best preserved Roman cemetery.

Sunlight and vitamin D levels higher for coastal populations

People living close to the coast in England have higher vitamin D levels than inland dwellers, according to a new study published in the journal Environment International.

Critical green turtle habitats identified in Mediterranean

A new study led by the University of Exeter has identified two major foraging grounds of the Mediterranean green turtle 

Alzheimer’s Society & University of Exeter join forces in fight against dementia

Alzheimer’s Society has announced the launch of a new dementia-focussed Doctoral Training Centre at the University of Exeter. The centre will support eight PhD students to investigate the effect of dementia on the brain’s neural networks.

New interactive BBC documentary stars Exeter academic

A ground breaking interactive BBC documentary series exploring some of the biggest questions facing mankind about its past, present and future features expert commentary from University of Exeter religion scholar Professor Francesca Stavrakopoulou. 

You can be a coward or a fighter. Just pick one and stick with it, says study

When the chips are down, having a strong personality may be the difference between thriving and failing.

Exeter team to monitor impact of wild beavers on our waterways

A team at the University of Exeter is to study England’s only breeding population of wild beavers in order to understand their impact on pollution, flooding and water quality after an announcement yesterday.

Genomic differences between developing male and female brains in the womb

New research by scientists at the University of Exeter and King’s College London has made significant progress towards understanding the complex process of prenatal human brain development.

Hydrogen sulfide could help lower blood pressure

A gas that gives rotten eggs their distinctive odour could one day form the basis of new cardiovascular therapies.

Negative patient-doctor communication could worsen symptoms

Doctors who unintentionally communicate to patients that they do not believe or understand them could actually make their symptoms worse, a new study suggests.

Global warming doubles risk of extreme La Niña event, research shows

The risk of extreme La Niña events in the Pacific Ocean could double due to global warming, new research has shown.

Exeter academic contributes to UK parliament report on Iraq

A University of Exeter, Middle East political expert features heavily in a new report by the House of Commons Foreign Affairs Committee on ‘UK Government policy on the Kurdistan Region of Iraq’.

Research pinpoints new technique for producing cheaper solar energy

Pioneering new research could pave the way for solar energy to be converted into household electricity more cheaply than ever before.

UK-first renewable heat network demonstration secures research funding

A low carbon heating project involving the University of Exeter has been awarded a Government research grant to carry out feasibility work to create a UK-first community-wide energy scheme.

Study reveals why geese adopt a ‘roller coaster strategy’ to combat life’s highs and lows

A new study has discovered that the world’s highest flying bird, the bar-headed goose, employs an unusual flight strategy when migrating at extreme altitudes across the Himalayas in order to cope in the relatively low-density mountain atmosphere.

Wild pollinators at risk from diseased commercial species of bee

A new study from the University of Exeter has found that viruses carried by commercial bees can jump to wild pollinator populations with potentially devastating effects. 

Exhibition reveals the impact of WW1 on art and facial reconstructive surgery

A new exhibition exploring how facial injuries suffered by soldiers during the First World War have influenced artists and surgeons will open this weekend.  

Mr and Mrs Disraeli: A Strange Romance

The union of a wealthy older woman who caused offence in polite society and a political nobody who would become one of the foremost politicians of the Victorian age is the subject of a new book.

Wolfson Foundation donates £2m towards future of science at Exeter

Exeter has received a £2 million gift from The Wolfson Foundation to support the establishment of a new Living Systems Institute, which will pioneer a new approach to treating the world’s most serious diseases.

Plastic pollution threatens one of the ocean’s key inhabitants

Microscopic plastic pollution, which is present throughout the world’s seas, could affect the feeding habits of one of the ocean’s key inhabitants.

New study will examine environmental antibiotic resistance

A new £1.2million grant from the Natural Environment Research Council is hoping to boost our understanding of how pollution can promote antibiotic resistance.

GraphExeter defies the Achilles heel of wonder material graphene

A resilience to extreme conditions by the most transparent, lightweight and flexible material for conducting electricity could help revolutionise the electronic industry, according to a new study.

Study uncovers the reason behind health and safety myths

New research from the University of Exeter reveals some of the complex reasons why health and safety regulations are used incorrectly and blamed for over-the-top decisions. 

New book reveals a hidden Britain

Where is Cornwall on the map of Britain? It may be down in the bottom corner if you’re talking road maps or OS sheets, but that’s not the only way of thinking about the position of the county, according to a new book by a University of Exeter academic.

Disadvantaged men more likely to do ‘women’s work,’ reveals new study

New research has revealed that men who are disabled and from an ethnic minority are significantly more likely to do jobs traditionally associated with women.

Number one bestseller for Exeter archaeologist

A University of Exeter archaeologist’s book, about perishable material culture is the number one bestseller for 2014 Routledge titles across their Archaeology and Museum Studies fields. 

The terrifying rise of the Gothic

To mark the 250th anniversary of the earliest Gothic novel, first published on Christmas Eve 1764 as a seasonal ghost story, a new edition of The Castle of Otranto introduced by a University of Exeter academic is now available.

South West wins national Genomics Medicine Centre

A ground-breaking genomic medicine project, which aims to establish England as a world leader in the fight against cancer and rare disease, will be led in the South West by the Royal Devon & Exeter NHS Foundation Trust (RD&E) working with other health trusts and universities.

Exeter archaeologist contributes to new Roman Britain TV programme

A new TV programme telling the story of what life was like for Romans and Britons 2000 years ago involves a unique journey across Britain by helicopter with commentary from a University of Exeter archaeologist. 

World-leading Medical research in UK top ten

Research at the University of Exeter Medical School has ranked in the UK top ten, for demonstrating world-leading impact on health and wellbeing across the globe.

Herd Mentality: Are we programmed to make bad decisions

A natural desire to be part of the ‘in crowd’ could damage our ability to make the right decisions, a new study has shown.

Mother plants teach seeds about seasons and give them a thicker coat when it's cold

New research from the University of Exeter and the John Innes Centre has found that 'mother' plants remember the seasons and use this memory to teach their seeds the time of year and tell them when they should germinate. 

Study recommends GPs should be more open when referring patients for cancer investigations

GPs should consider a more overt discussion with patients when referring them for further investigation of symptoms which may indicate cancer, according to a paper published in the British Journal of General Practice.

Attitudes to climate change depend on people’s sense of belonging to the planet

New research led by the University of Exeter has found that people who have a stronger sense of place at the global than the national level are more likely to accept that climate change is caused by human activities. 

Training elderly in social media improves well-being and combats isolation

Training older people in the use of social media improves cognitive capacity, increases a sense of self-competence and could have a beneficial overall impact on mental health and well-being.

Energy efficient homes linked to asthma

The drive for energy efficient homes could increase asthma risks, according to new research.

University signs up to mental health anti-stigma pledge

The University of Exeter is joining a growing number of companies committing to end the stigma and discrimination against people with experience of mental health problems by signing a pledge with Time to Change, a programme run by the charities Mind and Rethink Mental Illness.

Research could unlock revolutionary new procedure for epilepsy diagnosis

Pioneering new research by the University of Exeter could revolutionise global diagnostic procedures for one of the most common forms of epilepsy.

Exploring the impact of TASERs in the UK

Social Scientists at the University of Exeter have called for a greater comparative analysis of the impact of TASERs used in law enforcement.  

Study finds early warning signals of abrupt climate change

A new study by researchers at the University of Exeter has found early warning signals of a reorganisation of the Atlantic oceans’ circulation which could have a profound impact on the global climate system.

Study finds that correcting myths about the flu vaccine may not be effective in promoting immunisation

New research in the journal Vaccine concludes that correcting myths about vaccines may not be the most effective approach to promoting immunisation among vaccine sceptics.

What really helps women achieve a good work-life balance?

Professor Michelle Ryan delivers keynote at prestigious conference on what really helps women achieve a good work/life balance.

£1.1 million boost to improve long-term weather and climate forecasting across Europe

The University of Exeter has received a £1.1 million grant to fund pioneering new research that will significantly improve crucial long-term weather forecasts across Europe.

Researchers to use algae to clean up mine water

A ground breaking research project aims to clean up water from a Cornish tin mine, using algae to harvest the precious heavy metals and produce biofuel.

Drugs in the environment affect plant growth

The drugs we release into the environment are likely to have a significant impact on plant growth, finds a new study led by the University of Exeter Medical School and Plymouth University.

Diabetes award recognises international research impact

A professor who has contributed to significant advances in the understanding of the genetics of diabetes has been named as joint winner of an international prize.

Birds conform to local 'traditions'

Birds learn new foraging techniques by observing others in their social network according to a study involving University of Exeter researchers. 

Macho stereotypes put off men as well as women

Some men are being driven away from macho occupations like surgery and the Royal Marines because they don’t feel that they are ‘man enough’, according to new research.

You can hear the coral reefs dying

You can hear the sound of former bustling coral reefs dying due to the impact of human activity, according to new research from the Universities of Exeter and Essex

Exhibition reveals how Victorian artists reawakened the Gothic in the South West

From the spires of Truro Cathedral, to the rose window of Exeter’s Royal Albert Memorial Museum (RAMM), the South West boasts some of the finest medieval-style architecture in Britain – yet these landmarks were built in the 19th century.

Research finds clue to why females live longer than males

Results could help researchers understand the mechanisms involved in ageing. 

Study reveals significantly increased risk of stillbirth in males

A large-scale study led by the University of Exeter has found that boys are more likely to be stillborn than girls.

Exeter researcher wins prestigious Philip Leverhulme Prize in Biological Sciences

A Biosciences researcher at the University of Exeter is one of only five UK bioscientists to be awarded £100,000 from the Leverhulme Trust.

Reports identify areas where wildlife can survive in a changing climate

The University of Exeter has worked with Natural England on a project that helps to target conservation action.

New research suggests shape of our spines is key to lifting correctly

New research shows that the age-old mantra of 'bend your knees and keep your back straight’ when lifting may not work for everyone.

University of Exeter research contributes to establishment of first Marine Protected Area Network in Central Africa

Government of Gabon announces the decision to create a New Marine Protected Area Network  - covering about 23 percent of Gabon's territorial waters and EEZ (Exclusive Economic Zone)

Not just child’s play – study provides benchmark for identifying those at risk

Boys perform better than girls in speed, limb strength and cardiorespiratory fitness, whilst girls have the edge in balance and flexibility, according to a landmark study of European children.

Scoring system masks variation between GPs’ communication skills

A large-scale study has revealed that the system of aggregating practice scores on GPs’ communication skills may mask variation between individual doctors in lower-scoring centres.

Scientists urge public to take part in third wave of health survey

Scientists in Cornwall are renewing an appeal for people to take part in research that will shed light on the health effects of marine pollution.

Brain’s response to threat silenced when we are reminded of being loved and cared for

Being shown pictures of others being loved and cared for reduces the brain’s response to threat, new research from the University of Exeter has found.

New research examines shellfish consumption

A pioneering Cornish research partnership is providing invaluable information to the UK’s shellfish industry by improving understanding of what seafood people choose to eat and why.

New laws threaten Brazil's unique ecosystems

Brazil's globally significant ecosystems could be exposed to mining and dams if proposals currently being debated by the Brazilian Congress go ahead, according to research co-authored by an Exeter academic published today in the journal Science.  

What it means to be human: a festival of ideas in Cornwall

The Cornish landscapes and sea provide inspiration for a festival using the arts to explore the way people live and relate to in their local environments and communities. 

Creatively exploring mental health

A workshop to increase awareness of alternative approaches to treating mental illness and fostering wellbeing is being held at St Stephen’s Church, High Street Exeter on Friday 7 November. 

Study reveals startling decline in European birds

Bird populations across Europe have experienced sharp declines over the past 30 years, with the majority of losses from the most common species, say researchers from the University of Exeter.

New research shows that bats will hang out with their friends this Halloween

New research has shown that despite moving house frequently, bats choose to roost with the same social groups of ‘friends’. 

New research quantifies 'shocking' impact of cumulative pay discrimination

New research quantifies ‘shocking’ impact of cumulative pay discrimination

Universities’ collaboration celebrated

The GW4 Alliance, which brings together the combined strengths of the universities of Bath, Bristol, Cardiff and Exeter, held its official launch last night.

Exeter wins £1m funding for new initiative in bio-medicine

The University of Exeter has been awarded £1 million by the Wellcome Trust to establish an initiative aimed at advancing our understanding of living systems and the causes of disease.

BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival showcases Exeter academics

Two Humanities academics from the University of Exeter will be recorded in front of an audience at BBC Radio 3’s Free Thinking Festival of Ideas at the Sage, Gateshead. 

Bioscience researchers awarded Darwin Initiative grant.

University of Exeter researchers have been awarded a two-year grant to promote the conservation of threatened marine animals.

Rising ocean acidity threatens sea life

Researchers in Exeter have found that sea creatures will be affected by rising ocean acidity.

Health checks over the net could signal fewer visits to the doctor

Health experts are to investigate whether replacing face-to-face doctor’s visits with telephone or internet consultations would bring benefits for patients and GPs.

Citizens’ take-over of Cornwall Council

On Saturday 1 November, a unique opportunity for Cornish people to take direct action by saying what the priorities for Cornwall should be is being made possible at County Hall, Truro.

Military historian shortlisted twice for major international awards

One of the world’s largest history prizes, has shortlisted ‘The Bombing War: Europe 1939-1945’ by University of Exeter historian, Professor Richard Overy. 

Caribbean coral reef inhabitants critical in determining future of reefs

New research led by the University of Exeter has found that species that live in and erode coral reefs will play a major role in determining the future of reefs.

Genetic testing seeks co-ordinated approach in re-contacting patients

A new study will be examining the implications of when and how NHS healthcare professionals re-contact patients with new genetic information that may impact their health or that of their family.

Minister for Universities, Science and Cities visits University of Exeter

Greg Clark MP, the Minister for Universities, Science and Cities met with key researchers and business representatives during a fact-finding visit to the University of Exeter.

Rural traditions book shortlisted for folk award

An acclaimed book about English rural traditions has been shortlisted for a national folklore award.

Older women more likely to have multiple health conditions

Call for urgent prioritisation of multimorbidity research to guide policy. 

Coastal living boosts physical activity - but only in the West

People who live close to the coast are more likely to meet physical activity guidelines than inland dwellers, finds a new study released today.

Air pollution increases river-flows

A study published in Nature Geoscience shows that air pollution has had a significant impact on the amount of water flowing through many rivers in the northern hemisphere.

Research paves way for new generation of fungicides

Research by the University of Exeter has provided novel insight into the mechanism by which pathogenic fungi avoid the immune responses of the plants they attack.

Stroke survivors needed for rehabilitation exercise research - recruitment now complete

Around 150,000 people a year in the UK suffer a stroke, and exercise is recognised as a beneficial and effective part of their rehabilitation programme.

University of Exeter’s commitment to gender equality in the sciences confirmed

The University of Exeter’s commitment to gender equality in science disciplines has been recognised through a prestigious national award scheme.

Genetic test for cancer patients could be cost-effective and prevent further cases

Screening for a genetic condition in younger people who are diagnosed with bowel cancer would be cost-effective for the NHS and prevent new cases in them and their relatives, new research has concluded.

Cervical cancer symptoms not recognised by young women

New research led by King’s College London and involving the University of Exeter Medical School suggests that many women under 30 with cervical cancer are diagnosed more than 3 months after first having symptoms.

Exeter archaeologist ensures thousands of Roman coins in Devon are recorded

A hoard of 22,000 Roman coins has been unearthed on land near Seaton in Devon.

Simple blood test could be used as tool for early cancer diagnosis

High levels of calcium in blood, a condition known as hypercalcaemia, can be used by GPs as an early indication of certain types of cancer, according to a study by researchers from the University of Exeter Medical School and the University of Bristol.

Eureka moments between the sciences and the arts

Exeter academics have secured two of seven research awards to explore the cutting edge relationships between the sciences and the arts and humanities.

Working together to promote greater resilience to flooding

Researchers from the University of Exeter are working to help communities become more resilient to natural hazards like flooding. 

Exeter bioscientist awarded Royal Society University Research Fellowship

A University of Exeter bioscientist is one of 43 UK scientists to be made a Royal Society University Research Fellow for 2014. 

CO2 emissions set to reach new 40 billion tonne record high in 2014

Remaining CO2 emission ‘quota’ may be used up in one generation and half of all fossil fuel reserves may need to be left untapped.

Expedition finds Nemo can travel great distances to connect populations

New research shows that as babies clownfish sometimes travel hundreds of kilometres across the open ocean.

Lord of the Flies 60th anniversary marks handover of Golding archive to University

Lord of the Flies, the classic novel by William Golding, marks the 60th anniversary of its publication on 17 September.

New leaflet emphasises that "it's safe to talk about suicide" on World Suicide Prevention Day

A new public education leaflet, informed by University of Exeter Medical School research, has been launched to build confidence in talking to people about suicide, and could help save lives.

Devon children act up for healthy living

An innovative programme which brings actors into the classroom to encourage and support children to make healthier choices on diet and exercise has been selected to feature in this week’s British Science Festival.

Innovation in frontline healthcare strengthened by new collaboration

Excellence in frontline healthcare in the South West is being boosted by the launch of a new collaboration designed to put the region on the map.

Behind the scenes at 'the biggest fish tank you have ever seen'

An unusual large scale experiment being led by a group of scientists at the University of Exeter investigating how fish respond to underwater noise is the subject of a new NERC Planet Earth podcast.

Burnt out birds suggest hard work could be bad for your health

Unequal sharing of workloads in societies could leave the most industrious individuals at higher risk of poor health and prone to accelerated ageing, according to a new study of a cooperative bird in the Kalahari Desert.

New investment unites Exeter and Plymouth researchers to defeat dementia

Researchers in Exeter and Plymouth have been brought together in an exciting new venture to defeat dementia.

Why plants in the office make us more productive

‘Green’ offices with plants make staff happier and more productive than ‘lean’ designs stripped of greenery, new research shows.

Exeter academics elected to the Academia Europaea

Exeter academics in both the Arts and Sciences have been honoured with election to the prestigious Academia Europaea.

Protected areas proven to conserve biodiversity

Protected areas such as nature reserves and national parks do conserve biodiversity and more action is needed to ensure safeguards are in place to preserve them, according to a new international study.

Invisible blood in urine may indicate bladder cancer

New research finds that invisible blood in urine may be an early warning sign of bladder cancer.

Indoor mould poses health risk to asthma sufferers

Damp and mould in homes could pose a significant health risk to people with asthma according to a new study published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

New study charts the global invasion of crop pests

Many of the world’s most important crop-producing countries will be fully saturated with pests by the middle of the century if current trends continue, according to a new study led by the University of Exeter.

It’s all a front – scientists unravel the mystery of gannets’ feeding success

Researchers at Plymouth Marine Laboratory and the University of Exeter have combined two innovative technologies to probe the mystery of how seabirds locate food hotspots across vast tracts of ocean.

Self-deceived individuals deceive others better

Over confident people can fool others into believing they are more talented than they actually are, a study has found.

Cornish residents sought for study into environmental risks

Scientists at the University of Exeter’s Penryn Campus are seeking members of the public to help conduct research into how certain plants, animals and other environmental factors in and around homes are perceived by Cornish residents.

Commitment eases access to medical advances in developing world

The University of Exeter has strengthened its commitment to encouraging access to medicine in low income and developing countries by adopting a new approach to health-related intellectual property on products and technologies deriving from its research.

Scientists urge public to take part in second wave of health survey

Scientists in Cornwall are making a second appeal for people to take part in research that will shed light on the health effects of marine pollution.

Epigenetic breakthrough bolsters understanding of Alzheimer’s disease

A team led by researchers at the University of Exeter Medical School and King’s College London has uncovered some of the strongest evidence yet that epigenetic changes in the brain play a role in Alzheimer’s disease.

New study takes the shine off magpie folklore

Magpies are not attracted to shiny objects and don’t routinely steal small trinkets such as jewellery, according to a new study.

Research shows how buildings can better generate and retain energy

A PhD student has published new research into how improvements to Building Integrated Photovoltaic (BiPV) systems can mean more efficient, lower cost energy.

Are flexible parents adaptable parents?

The flexibility of parental behaviours to respond to changes in behaviour of their offspring may actually constrain the ability of parents to adapt to changes in their wider environment.

Hidden Florence revealed through new history tour App

An opportunity to experience an unseen side of Florence is now possible via a new smartphone App which brings the past to life through the eyes of an ordinary 15th century Florentine.

New study reveals the effect of habitat fragmentation on the forest carbon cycle

Drier conditions at the edges of forest patches slow down the decay of dead wood and significantly alter the cycling of carbon and nutrients in woodland ecosystems, according to a new study.

Cornwall team investigates potential for bacteria to boost Europe’s metal production

Cornwall could lead the way in developing green techniques to help European mining companies extract more scarce and valuable metals and significantly reduce their environmental impact.

Man-made noise makes fish more susceptible to predators

Despite their reputation as slippery customers, a new study has shown that eels are losing the fight to survive when faced with marine noise pollution such as that of passing ships.

Insights into predator vision revealed in ambitious field project

The question of how animals see, or what the world looks like through their eyes, has vexed and fascinated biologists for centuries. 

Research key weapon in government “war cabinet” to tackle antibiotic resistance

Research at the University of Exeter Medical School is part of an unprecedented cross council collaboration to tackle the rising threat of antibiotic resistance.

Link between vitamin D and dementia risk confirmed

Vitamin D deficiency is associated with a substantially increased risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease in older people, according to the most robust study of its kind ever conducted.

Cornish winemakers could benefit from climate change study

The UK’s burgeoning winemaking industry will benefit from new research to assess climate change's impacts on Cornwall’s vineyards.

Primary care telephone triage does not save money or reduce practice workload

Demand for general practice appointments is rising rapidly, and in an attempt to deal with this, many practices have introduced systems of telephone triage. Patients are phoned by a doctor or nurse who either manages the problem on the phone, or agrees with the patient whether and how urgently they need to be seen.

First World War announcement given historic perspective

As part of the World War One centenary and its outbreak on 4 August 1914, University of Exeter historian Dr Catriona Pennell will be looking back at how Britain entered the war on BBC Radio 4’s World Tonight for a special hour long edition from the Imperial War Museum.

Bees able to spot which flowers offer best rewards before landing

Bumblebees are able to connect differences in pollen quality with floral features, like petal colour, and so land only on the flowers that offer the best rewards, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Exeter.

Major turtle nesting beaches protected in one of the UK's far flung overseas territories

Sea turtles are not a species one would normally associate with the United Kingdom. But on the remote UK overseas territory of Ascension Island, one of the world’s largest green turtle populations is undergoing something of a renaissance.

Problem drinking in midlife doubles chance of memory problems in later life

A study published today [Weds July 30] in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry indicates that middle-aged adults with a history of problem drinking are more than twice as likely to suffer from severe memory impairment in later life.

Noise pollution impacts fish species differently

Acoustic disturbance has different effects on different species of fish, according to a new study from the Universities of Exeter and Bristol which tested fish anti-predator behaviour.

Stress can make hard working mongooses less likely to help in the future

Researchers studying banded mongooses in Uganda have discovered that those who work hard to care for pups may be less likely to invest in future offspring in the same way due to elevated stress hormones.

Should we listen to our genes, or does mother know best?

Breaking the mould of inherited family characteristics could help you survive in a fast-changing world, scientists have discovered.

New report takes stock of jellyfish in UK seas

A new report by the University of Exeter and the Marine Conservation Society (MCS) takes stock of where and when UK jellyfish occur in UK seas for the first time in over 40 years.

Age of puberty in girls influenced by which parent their genes are inherited from

The age at which girls reach sexual maturity is influenced by ‘imprinted’ genes, a small sub-set of genes whose activity differs depending on which parent passes on that gene, according to new research published today in the journal Nature

Microplastics worse for crabs and other marine life than previously thought, study shows

The tiny plastic particles polluting our seas are not only orally ingested by marine creatures, but also enter their systems through their gills, according to a new study led by the University of Exeter.

Jerusalem Unbound: a City in Conflict

A new book, Jerusalem Unbound, plots the history and examines the underlying factors that make a peace agreement between Israel and the Palestinians so difficult.

Study reveals how gardens could help dementia care

A new study has revealed that gardens in care homes could provide promising therapeutic benefits for patients suffering from dementia.

Feedback control could be key to robust conservation management

Mathematical algorithms used to control everyday household items such as washing machines could hold the key to winning the fight for conservation, a new study has claimed.

Rediscovered World War One novel turned into play

A lost novel by a popular World War One soldier poet has been discovered in a garage and turned into a play which is soon to be performed at the Everyman Theatre, Cheltenham.

Superheroes to the rescue, to religious education and beyond

A new initiative that uses superheroes to teach Religious Education at a school in Cornwall has won a national award.

Rotten egg gas holds key to healthcare therapies

It has a reputation for being highly toxic, but when used in the right tiny dosage, hydrogen sulfide is now being being found to offer potential health benefits in a range of issues, from diabetes to stroke, heart attacks and dementia.

Showcase highlighted innovation to improve healthcare and treatment

A wide range of research which is advancing knowledge on some of the greatest health challenges of our time was showcased at a dynamic event.

‘Amazonian savannah’ supported ancient civilizations before rainforest took over

Large parts of the Amazon basin may have supported farming communities and looked more like open savannah than rainforest, prior to the arrival of Europeans in South America, scientists have found.

Regional weather extremes linked to atmospheric variations

Variations in high-altitude wind patterns expose particular parts of Europe, Asia and the US to different extreme weather conditions, a new study has shown.

Exeter scientist reveals secrets of Scotland’s basking sharks in new report

Seas between the islands of Skye and Mull on Scotland’s west coast are highly important for basking sharks, according to a report published today by Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH).

Exeter social scientists play leading role in major environmental assessment

Social scientists in Politics at the University of Exeter played leading roles in a major new assessment of UK environment resources

WW1 soldier poet and composer Ivor Gurney shines bright at the BBC Proms

Archival research brings to light previously unheard, as well as rarely performed chamber, orchestral and choral works by World War One soldier, poet and composer Ivor Gurney.

Recreational football reduces high blood pressure in mature women

The World Cup in Brazil may be attracting a global armchair audience of millions, but new research has shown that playing football could help lower blood pressure in women aged 35-50.

Imagining the suburbs research event and book launch

The suburbs spread far and wide beyond city boundaries yet are rarely celebrated as places of cultural interest or excitement. 

Facial injuries and surgical advances exhibition

Soldiers in World War One with serious facial injuries are the catalyst for a research project and a new exhibition.

Exeter 6th in UK for most cited researchers says new global ranking

Eight University of Exeter academics feature in an authoritative new list of the most highly cited researchers, published this week by Thompson Reuters. This places Exeter 6th in the UK.

Earth’s breathable atmosphere a result of continents taking control of the carbon cycle, study suggests

Scientists investigating one of the greatest riddles of the Earth’s past may have discovered a mechanism to help determine how oxygen levels in the atmosphere expanded to allow life to evolve.

Centenary celebrations of Brazil versus Exeter City FC

With the World Cup kicking off in Brazil, a special website and programme of events are being created to commemorate the historic match between the hosts and Exeter City Football Club 100 years ago. 

World Dementia Envoy opens Exeter health innovation hub

An award-winning centre which is cementing Exeter’s global reputation for health innovation has been officially opened by the World Dementia Envoy, Dennis Gillings, CBE, PhD.

Building world-leading research communities

The first GW4 Alliance projects to receive funding to build research communities focused on tackling some of the world’s grand challenges, have been unveiled.

New approach to writing changes policy and practice

A decade of research into the development of writing in school-aged children at the University of Exeter has shaped classroom practice in the teaching of writing and informed national and international policy. 

Gone with the Wind 75th anniversary talk

The epic film Gone with the Wind marks its 75th anniversary this year. Scarlett O’Hara, the ultimate southern belle and heroine, forms the basis of a re-released book Scarlett’s Women: Gone with the Wind and its Female Fans which explores the film and why it appeals to a wide female fan base. 

Student awarded prestigious Zonta International Amelia Earhart Fellowship

Mars spacecraft research lands Exeter student top international fellowship

Scientists unravel the genetic secrets of nature’s master of mimicry

Scientists investigating how one of the greatest shape shifters in the natural world is able to trick predators to avoid being eaten have identified the gene behind the fascinating feat.

Practical, affordable, management measures could accelerate the path to malaria eradication

The scourge of malaria could be curbed more rapidly in developing countries if governments and other partners adopted a series of measures to enhance program management, as outlined in a new paper by the University of California San Francisco, led by the University of Exeter’s Professor of Leadership, Jonathan Gosling. 

Gannet sat nav reveals impact of fishing vessels

Fishing vessels have a far bigger ecological footprint than previously thought, according to research which tracked the movement and behaviour of seabirds using GPS devices.

BBC Radio 3 selects Exeter academics as new broadcasters

BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council’s (AHRC) nationwide search for academic broadcasters to turn ground-breaking ideas into fascinating programmes has been confirmed.

Early warning system predicts dengue fever risk during the Brazil World Cup

University of Exeter scientists have helped develop an early-warning system to predict the risk of dengue fever outbreaks in Brazil during the forthcoming World Cup.

Revolutionising Religious Education in schools

A new textbook has been written by University of Exeter academics which invites pupils to explore and interpret the meaning of biblical stories in a revolutionary new way.

Allotments yield healthier soil, study finds

The soils under Britain's allotments are significantly healthier than intensively farmed soils, researchers have found.

Scientists find best way to rid a garden of snails

Gardeners wanting to rid their spring flowerbeds of pesky snails can ditch the beer traps and egg shells and instead develop a strong throwing arm.

Conference helps medics wake up to sleep disorders

Stephanie was an active single mum with a busy full-time job, when her life was unexpectedly derailed by a rare condition.

Degraded coral reefs will threaten the livelihoods of fishermen

If coral reef health continues to decline, reefs of the future may not be able to support the food demands and livelihoods of millions of people living in the coastal tropics, according to new research from the Universities of Exeter and Queensland.

How will climate change affect health in the UK?

A new research partnership to identify the effects of environmental change, including climate change, on health and wellbeing in the UK has been launched.

Decolonisation of British and French Empires

Britain’s impending withdrawal from Afghanistan and France’s recent dispatch of troops to the troubled Central African Republic are but the latest indicators of a long-standing pattern.

New funding to aid cancer bowel diagnosis in the young

The Department of Health has awarded funding for a new research project run by the University of Exeter and Bowel Cancer UK.

Family business growth pilot prompts vision for national research hub

A national Rural Family Business Research Hub is being proposed for the West Country. The intention is to provide training, research and knowledge exchange.

Sexual conflict affects females more than males, says new research on beetles

Researchers at the University of Exeter have found that sexual conflict over mating impacts the parental care behaviour and reproductive productivity of burying beetles.

Research gives new insights into rare disease of the inner ear

A new study has shed light on the factors likely to lead to the development of a rare condition affecting the inner ear.

“Miracle treatment” families gather at Exeter centre of excellence

At five years old, Jack Neighbour’s neonatal diabetes health complications meant he had never spoken a word, and he communicated with his family through picture cards. Yet just six weeks after a genetic test by the team at the University of Exeter meant he could switch from insulin injections to tablets, he delighted his family by uttering his first words: the simple phrase “hello, mummy”.

“Now is the time to act and establish a national service for diabetes prevention,” say academics

A major collaborative study into the prevention of diabetes by a team of academics from the University of Leicester and the University of Exeter has found that ‘half-hearted’ attempts to implement diabetes prevention guidance are much less effective than professionally developed, high-quality programmes.

New report fights back against unfairness

Tackling issues of inequality in the city of Plymouth forms the basis of a new report, by the Plymouth Fairness Commission. 

Flood prone communities in UK and Africa to share their stories through theatre

An ambitious project exploring the shared experiences of flood-hit and vulnerable communities in Cornwall and Kenya has been announced today, with the aim of building resilience for those affected by climate change and extreme weather events.

Sex and History: Talking sex with objects from the past

A ground-breaking initiative from the University of Exeter, the Sex and History project, is offering schools a new way to tackle difficult topics in sex education.

Surviving and thriving under climate change in the world’s deltas

Researchers from the University of Exeter are investigating the effect of climate change on deltas in South Asia and Africa to understand how people will respond and adapt.

Male extinction prevented by promiscuous females

Female fruit flies with a large number of sexual partners are playing an invaluable role in preventing the extinction of males, new research has shown.

Exeter plays part in crucial climate change task force

Academics from Geography at the University of Exeter have played an important role in The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)’s most recent report.

Royal recognition for research on Ireland and the First World War

A University of Exeter historian was invited as one of a small group of VIPs to be individually presented to the Queen at a Buckingham Palace reception in advance of the visit of the Irish President, Michael D. Higgins, in April.

Doctors raise blood pressure in patients

Doctors routinely record blood pressure levels that are significantly higher than levels recorded by nurses, the first thorough analysis of scientific data has revealed.

The Poet Who Loved the War documentary presented by Exeter academic

Ivor Gurney, soldier-poet and composer, is the subject of a ground breaking new documentary to be televised on Sunday 30 March as part of the BBC’s programming to mark the centenary of the First World War.

Pioneering research offers new insight into improved wave energy testing

Pioneering research could provide a significant boost in the vital quest to harness wave power as a viable renewable energy source for the future.

Rural researchers to take the temperature of public opinion on UK environmental change

Social scientists at the University of Exeter are working with environmental policy makers to explore public views on the future management of UK ecosystems.

Queen to honour Exeter historian with MBE

Historian Dr Todd Gray has been awarded an MBE in the New Year’s Honours List for his voluntary services to Devon heritage. 

Humanities academics contribute to BBC WW1 centenary broadcasts

 As part of the BBC’s WW1 centenary programmes key academics from the University of Exeter are contributing to an assortment of high profile broadcasts. 

BBC reveals Dartmoor treasures with support from Exeter archaeologist

A rare and "amazing" burial discovery dating back 4,000 years has been described as the most significant find on Dartmoor: it is the subject of a new BBC2 TV programme on Sunday at 6.30pm.

Love or kill thy neighbour? New study into animal social behaviour

A theoretical study led by the University of Exeter has shed new light on the conditions that lead to the evolution of spite or altruism in structured populations.

Academic adds expertise to new BBC series on Asian migration

The 1950’s was a time when Britain desperately needed workers from its former colonies to regenerate its post-war economy. BBC Radio 4 is broadcasting a new three part series about the tens of thousands of migrants that came to Britain from the Indian subcontinent. 

Water racket - fish reactions to noise vary between species

Fish exposed to increased noise levels consume less food and show more stress-related behaviour, according to new research from the University of Bristol and the University of Exeter. 

Virtual bees help to unravel complex causes of colony decline

Scientists have created an ingenious computer model that simulates a honey bee colony over the course of several years.

MMR vaccination campaign messages can 'backfire', research shows

Messages designed to encourage parents to vaccinate their children against measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) can actually have the opposite effect, new research has revealed.

New study combats depression in carers

Psychologists from the University of Exeter are trialling an innovative new type of support to help relatives and friends who care for stroke survivors – with studies showing that currently one in three become depressed or suffer other mental health problems.

Benefits of revolutionary energy Smart Grids could bypass consumers, new report warns

Hard-pressed consumers could miss out on benefits delivered by revolutionary energy smart grids unless they are clearly publicised and explained, a ground-breaking new study has said.

Study uncovers why almost winning is just as good for some gamblers

A new study led by the University of Exeter and Swansea University has pinpointed the changes in the brain that lead gamblers to react in the same way to near-misses as they do to winning.

Climate change won’t reduce deaths in winter

New research has found that climate change is unlikely to reduce the UK’s excess winter death rate as previously thought. The study is published in the journal Nature Climate Change and debunks the widely held view that warmer winters will cut the number of deaths normally seen at the coldest time of year.

Ethics of stem cell clinical trials

A team at the University of Exeter are contributing to the largest clinical trial of adult stem cell therapy which has started in London.

Legal harvest of marine turtles tops 42,000 each year

A new study has found that 42 countries or territories around the world permit the harvest of marine turtles – and estimates that more than 42,000 turtles are caught each year by these fisheries.

Managed honeybees linked to new diseases in wild bees

Diseases that are common in managed honeybee colonies are now widespread in the UK’s wild bumblebees, according to research published in Nature.

Common medicines should mimic timing of body’s natural systems to prevent side-effects

Debilitating side effects associated with prescription medication for some of today’s most common conditions could be eradicated if they mimicked the body’s natural hormone secretion cycles, a new report has said.

Satellite tracking identifies Atlantic Ocean risk zones for leatherback turtles

The last large populations of the leatherback turtle are at risk because their migratory routes in the Atlantic Ocean overlap with the locations of industrial fisheries, a new study shows.

Report shows lack of knowledge about World War One's global impact

A widespread lack of understanding of the global scale and impact of the First World War has been revealed in a new report.

New book explores challenges for democracy in North Africa

The uncertainties surrounding the long-term prospect of democracy being fully embraced by North African nations embroiled in the Arab Spring rebellions are the focus of a fascinating new book. 

Valentine's lessons in love

Unrequited love may be a thing of the past this Valentine’s with the help of an English literature expert from the University of Exeter.

£10 million boost for South West health research

A £10 million partnership in Devon, Cornwall and Somerset, which supports research with direct impact on patients' health and on improvements to the way in which NHS care is delivered, is to begin its next five year phase this month.

New app to monitor Ménière’s Disease launched

A new mobile app has been launched this week to help researchers develop a better understanding of a rare condition affecting the inner ear.

Seasonal awareness a traditional way of life

A celebration of the traditional connections between human lives, the seasons and the natural world form the basis of a new book by University of Exeter academic, Professor Nick Groom.

Exeter historian shortlisted for new US military history prize

University of Exeter historian, Professor Richard Overy has been shortlisted for a new American military history prize for his book ‘The Bombing War: Europe, 1939-1945’.

Schizophrenia in the limelight: film-industry technology provides insights into social exclusion

The first 30 seconds of a social encounter is crucial for people with symptoms of schizophrenia for establishing contact with people, according to new research carried out at Queen Mary University of London and the University of Exeter Medical School.

Legacy gift of £280,000 will help advance dementia research

Dementia research at the University of Exeter Medical School has received a boost in the form of a legacy gift of £279,933 from the late Michael Harnell.

Diabetes blood glucose targets are risk free, research shows

Diabetes research led by the University of Exeter Medical School has underlined the importance of people with diabetes achieving their blood sugar goals, to reduce the risk of complications.

New approach to funding required for more effective collaborative research

A working culture and longer-term approach to funding that reflects the changing landscape of heritage science is essential for delivering impactful research, a team representing several of the UK’s foremost cultural and academic institutions has found.

Scandalous bodies and our relationship with food

Attitudes toward over-indulgence, obesity and body shape were being hotly debated and used for political purposes as early as the 19th century, a new book claims.

Antarctic’s Pine Island Glacier in ‘irreversible retreat’

An international team of scientists has shown that Pine Island Glacier, the largest single contributor to sea-level rise in Antarctica, has entered a period of irreversible, self-sustained retreat and is likely to increase its discharge into the ocean in comparison to the last decade.

Cambodian villagers best placed to prevent illegal logging

A study into deforestation in Cambodia has found that forests are better protected when villagers are given the responsibility to manage them locally.

NHS cancer risk threshold ‘too high’ for patients, research indicates

Patients have expressed an appetite for potential cancer symptoms to be checked out much sooner than current NHS thresholds guidelines suggest, new research has revealed.

Artificially cooling planet would cause climate chaos, new research shows

Plans to reverse the effects of global warming by mimicking big volcanic eruptions would have a catastrophic impact on some of the most fragile ecosystems on earth, new research has shown.

Scientists discover new causes of diabetes

Research by the University of Exeter Medical School has revealed two new genetic causes of neonatal diabetes.

Green spaces deliver lasting mental health benefits

Green space in towns and cities could lead to significant and sustained improvements in mental health, finds a new study published in the journal of Environmental Science & Technology.

Research into fruit fly cells could lead to cancer insights

New research by scientists at the University of Exeter has shown that cells demonstrate remarkable flexibility and versatility when it comes to how they divide – a finding with potential links to the underlying causes of many cancers.

€730,000 grant to develop more cost-effective and sustainable carbon fibres

A University of Exeter Engineering expert has been awarded a substantial European research grant aimed at developing more cost-effective and sustainable carbon fibres for the mass market.

Autism paper makes top ten

A study led by a University of Exeter Medical School scientist has been highlighted as one of the top ten advances in autism research of 2013.

Testing on revolutionary marine energy device begins

A groundbreaking renewable energy device which will harvest energy from the motion of the sea is about to be tested.

Exeter joins £18 million industry academia networks scheme to boost industrial biotechnology and bioenergy

The University of Exeter is set to benefit from a share of an £18million initiative designed to boost interaction between academic research and industry in biotechnology and bioenergy.

UK Biobank study shows Dad’s influence on birth weight linked to diabetes genes

One of the first studies to use recently released data from the UK Biobank has provided the strongest evidence yet for a link between fathers’ diabetes and low birth weight.

Exeter research celebrated in Impact Awards

During a glittering ceremony last night in the Great Hall the winners of the University of Exeter Impact Awards 2013 were revealed.

Disease, waste and the arts

Historically, art, medicine and science have had strong links, which may not be so obvious today.

Research into video games and performance art

Performance artists and researchers are joining forces to create a new type of video game, further blurring the boundaries between real and virtual worlds.

World War II compilation of New York Times articles

Daily reportage of World War II was covered first hand on the battlefields and the home front by journalists from The New York Times. 

Exeter researchers recognised as rising stars of research by Leverhulme Awards

Two young scholars at the University of Exeter have been recognised by the award of the highly prestigious Philip Leverhulme Prizes. 

International recognition for Cornish research

An expert in Cornish Studies has been awarded the highest mark of recognition available in Australia for their research. 

Can ancient philosophy of Stoicism help us to lead better and happier lives?

Philosophers from the University of Exeter and Birkbeck, University of London, and psychotherapists are calling on people to live like a Stoic for a week, from 25 November – 1 December 2013.

ADHD linked to social and economic disadvantage

Scientists have found evidence of a link between social and economic status and childhood attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the UK.

New book celebrates everyday repairs in the South West

A project led by two cultural geographers based at the University of Exeter’s Penryn Campus, and inspired by the practices of repair and renewal in the South West, is documented in a new book.

Playing with future of British armed forces

Social scientists are to examine whether action figure dolls help form children’s opinions on war and have a role to play in shaping the future of our armed forces.

British Asian culture festival flies over to India and Bangkok

A festival of British Asian culture is being taken to New Delhi and Bangkok, to celebrate the contribution and innovation of South Asians to the culture and life of Britain since the 1950’s.

Cause of genetic disorder found in “dark matter” of DNA

For the first time, scientists have used new technology which analyses the whole genome to find the cause of a genetic disease in what was previously referred to as “junk DNA”.

New research finds high tungsten levels double stroke risk

High levels of tungsten in the body could double the risk of suffering a stroke, a new study published in the open access journal PLOS ONE has found.

Exeter academic guides BBC2's new living history series Tudor Monastery Farm

Following the long-running success of BBC Two’s living history series, Victorian, Edwardian and Wartime Farm, a new series will be exploring life at the end of the Middle Ages in Tudor Monastery Farm

Best of WW1 poetry in a single book

The First World War produced an extraordinary flowering of poetic talent. Its poets mark the conflict in ways that are both intensely personal and as enduring as any monument.

Unpublished WW1 novel shares secrets of the past with a new generation

A heroic World War One soldier’s previously unknown semi-autobiographical novel has come to light following the completion of a project to archive and make public the manuscripts, poems and correspondence of Frederick William Harvey.

Leading sociologist to give talk at University of Exeter

Professor Carol Smart, Co-Director of the Morgan Centre for the Study of Relationships and Personal Life and Professor of Sociology at the University of Manchester is coming to the University of Exeter to discuss her research into donor conception.

 

Melting Arctic sea ice could increase summer rainfall in northwest Europe suggests new study

A new study offers an explanation for the extraordinary run of wet summers experienced by Britain and northwest Europe between 2007 and 2012. 

After the gold rush

New research suggests that 19th C. gold mining in California remains a major contamination risk. 

Speaking with the dead: All Souls Day

The Day of the Dead, also known as All Souls Day, is about commemoration. This practice of honouring and remembering the dead is observed in churches on 2 November.

Exeter water engineers collaborate with US researchers on global water issues

A new trans-Atlantic collaboration, ‘Clean Water for All’, will bring leading water engineers from the United States and the UK together to tackle problems of providing clean, sustainable water supplies.  

Internet therapy may help postnatal depression

Researchers at the University of Exeter have teamed up with online forum Netmums in a pilot study which has shown that post natal depression can be treated effectively using online therapy.

South, West and Wales consortium awarded £14.2m to nurture next generation of arts and humanities researchers

The South, West and Wales Consortium, in which the University of Exeter is joined with seven other universities – has been awarded £14.2 million funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC).

Hip-Hop demystifying mental illness

Hip-hop culture is being used as a vehicle for raising awareness about mental health at an event on Thursday 17 October, 7.30pm at Mama Stone’s in Exeter.

Poetry is like music to the mind, scientists prove

New brain imaging technology is helping researchers to bridge the gap between art and science by mapping the different ways in which the brain responds to poetry and prose.

University of Exeter in world top 100 for Arts and Science

The influential Times Higher Education (THE) World University Rankings have placed Exeter in the top 100 for both Arts and Humanities and Life Sciences. The two Colleges were ranked 65 and 95 respectively.

Childhood disability research funded for six more years

Families who care for disabled children have welcomed the news that a group that specialises in childhood disability research will continue to receive funding to take it through to 2019.

Basking shark tagging nominated for Best Conservation Project – four days left to vote

A shark tagging project run by the University of Exeter and Scottish Natural Heritage has been shortlisted for Best Conservation Project in the Countryfile Magazine awards. 

Maths predicts rise and fall of empires

Researchers have developed a new mathematical model that accurately describes the evolution of ancient empires.

The Black tents that defied a nation

A beach umbrella and a tent formed an unlikely Embassy, pitched on the lawns of the Australian Parliament on Australia Day 1972, by four Aboriginal activists.

Join the debate on the future of our heritage

On Monday 16 September, a special public debate will ask what the future holds for our past.

Exeter social scientists honoured by Academy

The Academy of Social Sciences has conferred the award of Academician on 51 leading social scientists, including Professor Anne Barlow from the University of Exeter’s Law School and Stephen Hinchliffe, Professor of Human Geography within Exeter’s College of Life and Environmental Sciences.

Public involvement in research: Getting the measure of success

Universities in Lancaster, Liverpool and Exeter have joined forces with the public to produce an innovative resource to help researchers assess the impact of public involvement in research.

 

Health and environment data to be linked for the first time

A new £800,000 grant from the Medical Research Council will allow scientists to connect diverse databases and probe the links between climate, environment, and human health.

Climate change will upset vital ocean chemical cycles

New research from the University of Exeter and the University of East Anglia (UEA) shows that rising ocean temperatures will upset natural cycles of carbon dioxide, nitrogen and phosphorous. 

Representation of Christianity and Islam in public spaces

The giant cube of Islamic graffiti art, standing in front of Exeter Cathedral forms part of a University of Exeter research project which investigates how Muslim belief has developed through theology, spirituality, law and the creative arts. 

New technique to assess the cost of major flood damage to be unveiled at international conference

A new approach to calculating the cost of damage caused by flooding is to be presented at the International Conference of Flood Resilience: Experiences in Asia and Europe at the University of Exeter.

Declassified spy photographs reveal lost Roman frontier

Declassified spy photography has uncovered a lost Roman Eastern frontier, dating from the second century AD.

Spread of crop pests threatens global food security as Earth warms

A new study has revealed that global warming is resulting in the spread of crop pests towards the North and South Poles at a rate of nearly 3 km a year. 

Playing tag with sharks off the west coast of Scotland

Twenty-seven basking sharks have been tagged in the second year of a project to find out more about their life cycle.

Go on, volunteer – it could be good for you!

Volunteering may be good for your health, reveals a large systematic review and meta-analysis led by the University of Exeter Medical School.

Untold story of Churchill’s World War II speeches

Popular belief is that Churchill’s wartime speeches were received enthusiastically by almost the whole British population and that they were the decisive influence on the nation’s willingness to fight on against the Nazis.

Open Day for largest Roman village ever found in Devon

An opportunity to experience the unfolding excavations at the largest Roman village ever found in Devon was open to members of the public on Sunday 18 August, at the site near Ipplepen in South Devon.

Study links chemicals in our body with income

A new study published this week has found that the build-up of harmful chemicals in the body is affecting people of all social standings - not just those from economically deprived backgrounds as previously thought.

Excellent science for the environment links Plymouth Marine Laboratory and the University of Exeter

Two of the South West’s leading environmental research organisations will work much more closely to address some of the key questions facing the sustainable future of the ocean, which ultimately supports all life on Earth.

University of Exeter announces Strategic Partnership with IBM

The University of Exeter today announced that IBM (NYSE: IBM), the world's largest IT and consulting services company, will be one of the first University of Exeter Strategic Corporate Partners.

€6.3m European Research Council success for Exeter five

Five early career academics from the University of Exeter are celebrating receiving European Grants worth a total of €6.3 million.

Shifting patterns of temperature volatility in the climate system

In recent decades there has been increased variability in yearly temperature records for large parts of Europe and North America, according to a study published in the journal Nature

Study investigates extraordinary trout with tolerance to heavily polluted water

New research from the University of Exeter and King’s College London has shown how a population of brown trout can survive in the contaminated waters of the River Hayle in Cornwall.

Second year of basking shark tagging gets underway

The second year of a project to track basking sharks in Scottish waters is now underway.

Further destabilisation in the Middle East possible according to new report

The crisis in Egypt is already having a negative effect on the Syrian civil war and contributing to further destabilisation of the wider Middle East according to a major new report. 

Tailoring diabetes treatment to older patients yields dramatic results

More than a quarter of over 70s with type 2 diabetes could benefit simply from improving communication and education in the clinic, new research has revealed.

Islamic graffiti and Sufi-Dub music enliven campus

Expressing Muslim belief through the creative arts forms the basis of an exhibition and series of live events at the University of Exeter on 11-13 June.  

Investigating Cornwall’s political past and present

Cornwall’s political heritage and relationship with Westminster is being explored in a new research programme. 

Researchers discuss health and wellbeing at Parliament

A team of researchers has hosted a briefing to Parliament, focusing on the complex links between the environment and health.

Public urged to have a say in developing bioenergy policy and priorities

Local people are invited to the University of Exeter’s Environment and Sustainability Institute (ESI) on Thursday 18 July to join researchers and the BBSRC (the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council) in an interactive session to help determine the future of bioenergy policy in the UK.

New book explores the patterns of conflict and cooperation between environmental organisations

In her new book, the Environment and Sustainability Institute's Dr Clare Saunders investigates the relationships between a broad range of environmental organisations.

British butterfly desperate for warm weather this summer

Butterflies are extremely sensitive to changes in temperature and new research has revealed that when summer weather turns bad the silver-spotted skipper battles for survival. 

Explore light pollution in a West Cornwall night-walk

Local residents and people with an interest in their local environment are being asked to get involved with an exciting light pollution event in St Just this summer.

Supporting poor communities through ecosystem services in Mozambique and Kenya

A new project led jointly by the University of Exeter and the Stockholm Resilience Centre has been awarded £1.9 million by Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation.

Scottish sharks to be tracked for a second year

Scientists are to extend a popular basking shark tracking project for another year, it was announced today.

Does your business have a sustainability challenge?

The University of Exeter’s Environment and Sustainability Institute (ESI) and Business School are seeking Cornish businesses to work with a small group of students this May.

Outdoor activity experts discuss South West environmental code of conduct

The University of Exeter’s Environment and Sustainability Institute (ESI) has held a conference with outdoor activity businesses to explore and discuss the establishment of a voluntary code of conduct for outdoor activity providers in Cornwall, which could help minimise their impact on the environment.

Taking refuge from climate warming: how can we help our wildlife?

Conservation policymakers and practitioners have met with researchers from the Environment and Sustainability Institute (ESI) to discuss the conservation potential of ‘microclimatic refugia’.

Group interaction among elderly is the key to significant health outcomes

The health benefits of 'water clubs' in care homes for the elderly, where residents gather together regularly to drink water, owe as least as much to the social nature of the activity as to the value of drinking water itself, an investigation by psychologists has shown.

Streetlight policies could cast a shadow over wildlife

Scientists have conducted the first study into the ecological effects of a variety of energy-saving options to reduce overnight street lighting.

New funding for research on conflict management in Central Asia

Three incidents of armed conflict in Uzbekistan, Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan form the focus of a major new research project assessing the effect of conflict management in Central Asia and how this affects the development of relationships with these young countries.

Cultural dimensions of climate change are underestimated, overlooked and misunderstood

The impact of climate change on many aspects of cultural life for people all over the world is not being sufficiently accounted for by scientists and policy-makers.

Rediscovering Cornwall's rural past through storytelling

A new project working with communities and primary schools to explore and rediscover Cornwall’s rural past through storytelling has been given the go ahead.

Exeter Scientists key to creating one of UK's greenest schools

Scientists at the University of Exeter have been heavily involved in developing a school which is in the national top ten for energy efficiency.

Exeter academic contributes to key Gulf report

A Middle East expert from the Strategy and Security Institute and the Institute of Arab and Islamic Studies at the University of Exeter has co-authored a major report focusing on the UK’s strategic reorientation of its defence and security in the Gulf.  

Revolutionary Iran

As Iran gears up for its elections in June, it is timely to have a major new book about the Islamic Republic. ‘Revolutionary Iran’ is the latest book by Dr Michael Axworthy, the Director of the University of Exeter’s Centre for Persian and Iranian Studies.

Traces of Algeria in France come to Exeter

An exhibition providing a snapshot of the tensions between Algeria and France is being exhibited at the University of Exeter’s Institute of Arab and Islamic Studies.

Free online cognitive-behavioural therapy for depression

Are you interested in receiving free online cognitive-behavioural therapy for depression?

Paper of the Year award for 2012

Professor Ed Watkins and his former PhD student John Galfin have won the newly instituted annual ‘Paper of the Year award’ for 2012 from the Palliative Medicine journal.

How does our brain “learn” from stressful events?

A study that aims to investigate how the brain processes stress and creates memories of psychologically stressful events will begin shortly thanks to funding of £758,000 from the Biotechnology and Biological Research Council.

Cognitive behavioural therapy proves effective at reducing depression in people who have not responded to antidepressants

Antidepressants are the most widely used treatment for people with moderate to severe depression.

The heart rules the head when we make financial decisions

Our ‘gut feelings’ influence our decisions, overriding ‘rational’ thought, when we are faced with financial offers that we deem to be unfair, according to a new study.

Exeter study inspires new brain injuries interest group

Research by a University of Exeter psychologist has inspired a group of charities and pressure groups to establish a new consortium, focused on the effects of brain injuries.

Training in 'concrete thinking' can be self-help treatment for depression

New research provides the first evidence that depression can be treated by only targeting an individual’s style of thinking through repeated mental exercises in an approach called cognitive bias modification.