Research News - 2013

£1.1 million will help develop products from super-material

New ways of making and using the wonder material graphene will be identified through pioneering work by engineers and scientists at the University of Exeter and Bath.

Health and medicine showcase hailed a success

A dynamic event highlighted the wide range of medical and health research involving the University of Exeter, the NHS and business partners.

How does our brain “learn” from stressful events?

A study that aims to investigate how the brain processes stress and creates memories of psychologically stressful events will begin shortly thanks to funding of £758,000 from the Biotechnology and Biological Research Council.

Pigeon project highlighted on BBC’s Winterwatch

Many people view pigeons as pests, or even ‘rats with wings’ - but according to one student, they are ‘super doves’.

How intermediate health and social care services enable better care closer to home

A new report by the University of Exeter Medical School researchers sheds light on how health and social care arrangements can avoid hospital admissions or enable people to leave hospital earlier.

South West research-intensive universities form grouping to bring together research strengths

The Universities of Bath, Bristol, Cardiff and Exeter today announced a formal collaboration, bringing together a high concentration of research expertise and capability in the South West of England and Wales.

Bio-inspired fibres change colour when stretched

A team of materials scientists at Harvard University and the University of Exeter has invented a new fibre which changes colour when stretched. Inspired by nature, the researchers identified and replicated the unique structural elements, which create the bright iridescent blue colour of a tropical plant’s fruit.

New evidence highlights threat to Caribbean coral reef growth

Many Caribbean coral reefs have either stopped growing or are on the threshold of starting to erode, new evidence has revealed.

Lungs of the planet reveal their true sensitivity to global warming

Tropical rainforests are often called the “lungs of the planet” because they generally draw in carbon dioxide and breathe out oxygen.

Students inspired to engage with research

Medical Schools across the South West have teamed up to offer a scheme which aims to foster a research culture among doctors and dentists entering the NHS.

Singles feel singled out

How come a wonderful person like you is still single? Research from the University of Exeter has revealed that single people feel worse about being single when they think about themselves as the odd ones out. 

Rising ocean acidity makes the effects of pollutants more damaging

Increasing levels of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere are changing ocean chemistry, making seawater more acidic.

Combined expertise creates a hub of weather and climate excellence in Exeter

Since its move to Exeter, the Met Office’s partnership with the University has made Exeter an international hub of expertise in weather and climate research, with joint projects worth over £30 million in various stages of development.

£5 million to expand knowledge on human health, life and space

Grants totalling more than £5 million will allow world-class researchers at the University of Exeter to push the boundaries of knowledge in ground-breaking five year projects.

Business School lecturer highly commended by leading academic publisher

Dr Stephen Jollands from the Business School has been given a Highly Commended Award in the 2012 Emerald/European Foundation for Management Development (EFMD) Outstanding Doctoral Research Awards.

Lizards facing mass extinction

Climate change could lead to dozens of species of lizards becoming extinct within the next 50 years, according to new research published today.

How birds of different feathers flock together

When different species of birds flock together, their flight formations are determined by social dynamics between and within species.

Buoyant bronze age boat makes history in Cornwall

Today history was made in Cornwall as a unique project to recreate a 4000 year old boat reached its dramatic conclusion as it launched into the waters of Falmouth Harbour.

Breast cancer technique to be tested on human breast tissue for the first time

A technique that could take away the anxious wait by patients for breast cancer results by removing the need for a needle biopsy is to have its performance evaluated for the first time, on breast tissue and lymph nodes.

International Women’s Day: Vodcast launched to boost numbers of female surgeons

A video podcast that aims to increase the number of women that embark on and succeed in surgical careers is being launched on International Women’s Day at the Royal College of Surgeons in London. 

Bioscience to battle ash dieback

The University of Exeter is a member of a consortium awarded £2.4M by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) for urgent research into the ash dieback fungus and the genetics of resistance in ash trees.

European countries pool expertise to save water

Intelligent water monitoring systems could soon be in place across Europe thanks to iWIDGET, a €5 million European Commission project that will use cutting edge smart-metering technology to improve water use efficiency.

Brain study seeks answers on dementia

Research which seeks to understand how the brain’s electrical behaviour is linked to dementia could pave the way for better treatment of diseases such as Alzheimer’s.

Beetroot juice – the winning formula for team sports

New research shows that drinking beetroot juice can significantly improve performance in team sports involving bouts of high intensity exercise.

Scottish sharks to be tracked for a second year

Scientists are to extend a popular basking shark tracking project for another year, it was announced today.

£1 million to investigate epigenetic factors in schizophrenia

Scientists will investigate the role of epigenetic processes in schizophrenia, a major cause of mental illness.

Exeter student strikes gold with physics display in Parliament

Claire Woollacott, 24, a PhD Postgraduate Research Student from the School of Physics at the University of Exeter, struck gold at a competition in the House of Commons yesterday for excellence in her physics research, walking away with a £3,000 prize.

Long predicted atomic collapse state observed in graphene

The first experimental observation of a phenomenon in quantum mechanics that was predicted nearly 70 years ago holds important implications for the future of graphene-based electronic devices.

Researchers discuss health and wellbeing at Parliament

A team of researchers has hosted a briefing to Parliament, focusing on the complex links between the environment and health.

Live tracking of vulnerable South Atlantic seabirds

Real-time information showing the locations of the threatened frigatebird is now available online thanks to a new Darwin Initiative funded study led by the University of Exeter and Ascension Island Government Conservation Department. 

Superfast model brain to predict flooding during heavy rain

Heavy rain has once again resulted in widespread flooding across the country. With climate change likely to cause further severe weather events in the coming years, methods of quickly predicting flooding will become increasingly important. 

Meditation technique enhances children’s mental health

Teachers in schools across the globe are turning to a new philosophy to help improve the behaviour and well-being of students. 

Miniature aircraft could help scientific data take off

In their most basic form, remote-controlled aircraft are the perfect gadget-lover’s toy, but now their high-tech cousins have the potential to revolutionise the way ecological data are collected.

Exeter receives share of £84 million boost to PhD training

The Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) is this year investing £84.2 million in postgraduate training through its annual Doctoral Training Grants (DTGs).

Predicting drought or rainfall in the desert

A new study by Professor Jim Haywood, from Mathematics at the University of Exeter, and colleagues suggests that sporadic volcanic eruptions in the northern hemisphere strongly influence the sea surface temperature and cause drought in the Sahel – the area of sub-Saharan Africa, just south of the Sahara desert. 

Thinking you’re old and frail

Older adults who categorise themselves as old and frail encourage attitudinal and behavioural confirmation of that identity.

Air pollution stunts coral growth

A new study has found that air pollution can shade corals from sunlight and cool the surrounding water resulting in reduced growth rates.

New research from the Centre for Innovation and Service Research identifies best practice in process redesign

There are many stories and anecdotes of world-class organisations that have been very successful in carrying out process redesign initiatives.

Revolutionary new device joins world of smart electronics

Unique properties of graphene and graphExeter combine to create a new flexible, transparent, photosensitive device.

Green spaces may boost wellbeing for city dwellers

New research published in the journal Psychological Science has found that people living in urban areas with more green space tend to report greater wellbeing than city dwellers that don’t have parks, gardens, or other green space nearby.

Bugs produce diesel on demand

It sounds like science fiction but a team from the University of Exeter, with support from Shell, has developed a method to make bacteria produce diesel on demand. 

Epigenetic changes shed light on biological mechanism of autism

A University of Exeter Medical School scientist is part of a team to have identified patterns of epigenetic changes involved in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) by studying genetically identical twins who differ in autism traits.

Battling with bugs to prevent antibiotic resistance

New scientific research published in the journal PLoS Biology shows that bacteria can evolve resistance more quickly when stronger antibiotics are used.

Fish win fights on strength of personality

When predicting the outcome of a fight, the big guy doesn’t always win, suggests new research on fish. 

Foul-smelling gas shows health benefits in reducing joint swelling

A gas associated with the smell of rotten eggs has proven to effectively reduce joint swelling, in research which could lead to advances in the treatment of arthritis.

World lobster experts gather in Cornwall

The University of Exeter Cornwall Campus has played host to a number of the world’s lobster experts at a recent marine crustacean knowledge exchange and networking event. 

Saturn’s youthful appearance explained

New research published in the journal Nature Geoscience has revealed how Saturn keeps itself looking young and hot.

Problematic pupil-teacher relationship could predict psychological problems

Problematic child-teacher relationships may be a predictor of psychological problems in later life, according to new research published online by the British Journal of Psychiatry.

Queen's Award for Exeter spin-out

Simpleware, a company set up to commercialise EPSRC-supported research at the University of Exeter, has won The Queen’s Award for Enterprise in the International Trade Category.

Researcher engaging Cornish businesses with climate change

A researcher from the University of Exeter Cornwall Campus is striving to get more businesses to engage with climate change.

Coral reefs' collapse isn't inevitable, researchers say

Coral reefs are in decline, but their collapse can still be avoided with local and global action.

Cardiff joins the Food Security Land Research Alliance

The Food Security Land Research Alliance (FSLRA) today (Friday 10 May 2013) announced that Cardiff University is to join the partnership.

Astronomers find evidence of hungry young exoplanets

While astronomers now know that exoplanets are exceedingly common in the galaxy, the mechanics by which they are formed aren’t well understood. Planetary childhood remains a mystery.

Food security expert, Sarah Gurr, gives talk for Research Focus Week

Food security is a global issue which affects us all. From production to supply, feeding a rapidly expanding population requires cutting edge technology and complex logistical networks.

Researcher working to boost Cornwall’s marine renewable energy industry

A Cornwall Campus student is collaborating with Falmouth Harbour Commissioners to investigate underwater noise and its effect on marine wildlife in Falmouth Bay.

Study of the machinery of cells reveals clues to neurological disorder

Investigation by researchers from the University of Exeter and ETH Zurich has shed new light on a protein which is linked to a common neurological disorder called Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. 

Why a little Beet It goes a long way

Athletes no longer ask whether beetroot juice improves sporting performance - they just want to know how much to drink, and when. A new study has the answers.

Children act on healthy living programme

Schools across Devon are becoming interactive theatres during a series of Healthy Lifestyle Weeks designed to formulate a programme which could ultimately be rolled out across all schools.

Children of long-lived parents less likely to get cancer

The offspring of parents who live to a ripe old age are more likely to live longer themselves, and less prone to cancer and other common diseases associated with ageing, a study has revealed.

Public creativity put to the test in Chelsea Flower Show psychology experiment

This year’s 100th Chelsea Flower Show will host an experiment to investigate whether office plants can be used to boost staff well-being and business profitability. 

Supporting poor communities through ecosystem services in Mozambique and Kenya

A new project led jointly by the University of Exeter and the Stockholm Resilience Centre has been awarded £1.9 million by Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation.

Exeter researchers work with Coca-Cola to transform home recycling

Researchers from the University of Exeter are working with Coca-Cola Enterprises (CCE) on a ground-breaking study with 20 households in Great Britain and France to observe at-home recycling behaviours. 

New research discovers snail shell coiling programmed by protein patterning

Snail shells coil in response to a lopsided protein gradient across their shell mantles, suggests research in BioMed Central’s open access journal EvoDevo.

Molecular genetics researcher receives European honour

Professor Nick Talbot has been elected to the membership of the European Molecular Biology Organisation (EMBO).

Shedding light on moths: whiter street lighting attracts more moths, but some like it more than others

Like their more visible cousins the butterflies, moths are undergoing rapid population declines.

Is enough being done to make drinking water safe?

There is a lack of evidence regarding the effectiveness of technologies used to reduce arsenic contamination finds research in BioMed Central’s open access journal Environmental Evidence.

University of Exeter professor named Institute of Physics president-elect

Professor Roy Sambles is to be the new president-elect of the Institute of Physics (IOP). 

Personality is the result of nurture, not nature, suggests study on birds

Personality is not inherited from birth parents says new research on zebra finches.

Female company directors are better judges of longer-term company performance

Groundbreaking research by the University of Exeter Business School reveals that female company directors defy negative gender stereotyping by astutely valuing future company performance.

Gannets don’t eat off each other’s plates

Colonies of gannets maintain vast exclusive fishing ranges despite doing nothing to defend their territory from rival colonies, scientists have discovered. 

British butterfly desperate for warm weather this summer

Butterflies are extremely sensitive to changes in temperature and new research has revealed that when summer weather turns bad the silver-spotted skipper battles for survival. 

Timely new report on research impact gives guidance to institutions and funders

Ahead of this year’s Research Excellence Framework (REF) a team from the University of Exeter, funded by Jisc, have authored a report which gives guidance on the definition, evidence and structures required to capture research impacts and benefits.

Study reveals significant leakage of carbon stored on land to rivers, lakes, estuaries and coastal regions

When carbon is emitted by human activities into the atmosphere it is generally thought that about half remains in the atmosphere and the remainder is stored in the oceans and on land. 

New research urges caution on use of peer support in chronic disease

Health organisations need to give careful consideration to schemes which encourage people with chronic diseases to seek support from peers, to avoid the potential negative effects, new research shows.

Advances in genetic sequencing diagnose Paralympic hopeful’s rare condition

National Paracycling Champion Tom Staniford has an extremely rare condition which, until now, has puzzled his doctors.

Physics student wins international research prize

Lachlan Marnham, 23, a PhD student in the Centre for Graphene Science, won the prize for best presentation at Graphene Week 2013 held in Chemnitz, Germany.

Rice blast research reveals details on how a fungus invades plants

A study by an international team of researchers has shed light on how the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae, invades plant tissue.

Older males make better fathers says new research on beetles

Mature males work harder and care less about female infidelity.

Exeter scientists discuss seasonal variability at Met Office workshop

Researchers from the University of Exeter co-organised a workshop at the Met Office in Exeter to discuss the possible reasons for Britain and Europe's unusual seasonal weather over the past few years.

 

Mindfulness can increase wellbeing and reduce stress in school children

Mindfulness – a mental training that develops sustained attention that can change the ways people think, act and feel – could reduce symptoms of stress and depression.

Study reveals uncertainty over the benefits of feeding birds in winter

The results of a new study has found that feeding wild blue tits in winter resulted in less successful breeding during the following spring.

Boat noise stops fish finding home

Boat noise disrupts orientation behaviour in larval coral reef fish, according to new research from the Universities of Exeter, Bristol and Liège.

New book explores relationship between photography, exploration, science and culture

Investigating the role of photography in scientific exploration.

Photos on social media used to measure aesthetic value of Cornish landscape

A new method designed to measure the aesthetic value of ecosystems has been applied in Cornwall.

Mathematicians meet in Exeter to tackle challenging climate problems

Mathematicians, climate scientists and leading policy makers from across the world are gathering this week, 1 – 5 July 2013, at the University of Exeter and the Met Office HQ in Exeter to tackle the challenging problems that forecasting the weather and the climate bring.

Hubble Telescope reveals variation between hot extrasolar planet atmospheres

First results from the analysis of eight 'hot Jupiter' exoplanets suggest that winds and clouds play an important role in the atmospheric make up of these exotic planets. 

New South West Health Innovation network aims to improve region's healthcare

Transforming patient care and public health in Exeter for the better is the collective pledge of the new South West Health Innovation network.

Tailoring diabetes treatment to older patients yields dramatic results

More than a quarter of over 70s with type 2 diabetes could benefit simply from improving communication and education in the clinic, new research has revealed.

Impact Awards key speaker announced

Top business woman Dame Stephanie ‘Steve’ Shirley has been confirmed as the keynote speaker for the 2013 Exeter Impact Awards.

Office plants boost well-being at work

Office plants can assist in boosting staff well-being by up to 47% according to research carried out at this year’s Chelsea Flower Show.

£50,000 for online documentary to explore risk

Exploring the idea of risk - in a short interactive documentary - forms the basis of a new project led by the University of Exeter in collaboration with viral advertising agency, Rubber Republic, Bristol. 

Blood pressure research wins National Prize

Research carried out at the University of Exeter Medical School on the monitoring of blood pressure has received the Royal College of General Practitioners Research Paper of the Year Award in the stroke category.

Further destabilisation in the Middle East possible according to new report

The crisis in Egypt is already having a negative effect on the Syrian civil war and contributing to further destabilisation of the wider Middle East according to a major new report. 

Ship noise impairs feeding and heightens predation risk for crabs

A study published in the journal Animal Behaviour found that the noise of passing ships disrupts feeding for the common shore crab. 

Hubble spots azure blue planet

True colour of exoplanet measured for the first time.

Energy and cost saving in mines achieved by innovative technique from Camborne School of Mines

A new approach that will save energy and reduce ventilation costs in mines has been developed by the University of Exeter’s Camborne School of Mines. 

Second year of basking shark tagging gets underway

The second year of a project to track basking sharks in Scottish waters is now underway.

Study investigates extraordinary trout with tolerance to heavily polluted water

New research from the University of Exeter and King’s College London has shown how a population of brown trout can survive in the contaminated waters of the River Hayle in Cornwall.

Shifting patterns of temperature volatility in the climate system

In recent decades there has been increased variability in yearly temperature records for large parts of Europe and North America, according to a study published in the journal Nature

Exeter engineer elected to the Royal Academy of Engineering for 2013

Professor Dragan Savić, Head of Engineering at the University of Exeter, has been elected a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering (FREng), the highest honour for a UK engineer. 

Excellent science for the environment links Plymouth Marine Laboratory and the University of Exeter

Two of the South West’s leading environmental research organisations will work much more closely to address some of the key questions facing the sustainable future of the ocean, which ultimately supports all life on Earth.

University of Exeter announces Strategic Partnership with IBM

The University of Exeter today announced that IBM (NYSE: IBM), the world's largest IT and consulting services company, will be one of the first University of Exeter Strategic Corporate Partners.

€6.3m European Research Council success for Exeter five

Five early career academics from the University of Exeter are celebrating receiving European Grants worth a total of €6.3 million.

Survey takes to the skies over SW England

The University of Exeter’s Camborne School of Mines (CSM) is working on an aerial survey, Tellus South West, with project leaders the British Geological Survey (BGS). 

Bacteria hold the clues to trade-offs in financial investments and evolution

Scientists have found that bacteria have the potential to teach valuable investment lessons.

New Test to Predict Death Risk from C. difficile

Accurate, robust and simple method of identification has potential benefits to patients, hospitals and health services around the world.

Study links chemicals in our body with income

A new study published this week has found that the build-up of harmful chemicals in the body is affecting people of all social standings - not just those from economically deprived backgrounds as previously thought.

£10 Million Boost to South West Health Research

A partnership that supports research in Devon and Cornwall with direct benefits to patients’ health and NHS care delivery has secured £10m in funding for the next five years.

Research trial into snoring brings new hope for sufferers

The solution to the age old problem of snoring has been right under our noses all along: if you want a decent night’s sleep then sing for it.

US depression treatment proved effective for UK

A US model of treating depression through a network of specialists could effectively be imported into the UK, new research has revealed.

Impact Awards deadline approaching

With the closing date of 13 September fast approaching, time is running out to enter this year’s Impact Awards.

Go on, volunteer – it could be good for you!

Volunteering may be good for your health, reveals a large systematic review and meta-analysis led by the University of Exeter Medical School.

UK children less likely to be diagnosed with ADHD

New research suggests that children are far less likely to be diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the UK than they are in the USA.

Moss growth in Antarctica linked to climate change

Increases in temperature on the Antarctic Peninsula during the latter part of the 20th century were accompanied by an acceleration in moss growth, scientists have learned.

Spread of crop pests threatens global food security as Earth warms

A new study has revealed that global warming is resulting in the spread of crop pests towards the North and South Poles at a rate of nearly 3 km a year. 

International experts to explore new “wonderdrug” at conference

A gas associated with the smell of rotten of eggs is now being proven to have widespread health benefits.

Research confirms Mediterranean diet is good for the mind

The first systematic review of related research confirms a positive impact on cognitive function, but an inconsistent effect on mild cognitive impairment. 

New technique to assess the cost of major flood damage to be unveiled at international conference

A new approach to calculating the cost of damage caused by flooding is to be presented at the International Conference of Flood Resilience: Experiences in Asia and Europe at the University of Exeter.

Researcher enabling local business to diversify

A student from the University of Exeter Penryn Campus is helping a local company to branch out and further develop their business.

Climate change will upset vital ocean chemical cycles

New research from the University of Exeter and the University of East Anglia (UEA) shows that rising ocean temperatures will upset natural cycles of carbon dioxide, nitrogen and phosphorous. 

Bad news for prey: New research shows that predators can learn to read camouflage

Camouflaged creatures can perform remarkable disappearing acts but new research shows that predators can learn to read camouflage. 

Health and environment data to be linked for the first time

A new £800,000 grant from the Medical Research Council will allow scientists to connect diverse databases and probe the links between climate, environment, and human health.

Public involvement in research: Getting the measure of success

Universities in Lancaster, Liverpool and Exeter have joined forces with the public to produce an innovative resource to help researchers assess the impact of public involvement in research.

 

Undersea mountains provide crucial piece in climate prediction puzzle

A mystery in the ocean near Antarctica has been solved by researchers who have long puzzled over how deep and mid-depth ocean waters are mixed.

Maths predicts rise and fall of empires

Researchers have developed a new mathematical model that accurately describes the evolution of ancient empires.

Showcase celebrates interdisciplinary research project

A showcase has celebrated the end of a three year project that created a physical and virtual environment where researchers could trade ideas, find inspiration, and build new partnerships.

Future sea level rises should not restrict new island formation in the Maldives

The continued accumulation of sand within the iconic ring-shaped reefs inside Maldivian atolls could provide a foundation for future island development new research suggests. 

Exeter climate scientists contribute to IPCC report

University of Exeter researchers have had a high profile role in creating the world’s most comprehensive report on climate change. 

Gathering information about food is not top priority for individuals with high metabolisms

New research has revealed that individuals with the highest metabolic rates within populations should be the least pre-occupied with keeping track of changes in their environments that could lead them to sources of food. 

Childhood disability research funded for six more years

Families who care for disabled children have welcomed the news that a group that specialises in childhood disability research will continue to receive funding to take it through to 2019.

Giant channels discovered beneath Antarctic ice shelf

The 250 metre high channels will help predict future of Antarctic ice

Poetry is like music to the mind, scientists prove

New brain imaging technology is helping researchers to bridge the gap between art and science by mapping the different ways in which the brain responds to poetry and prose.

Insulin ‘still produced’ in most people with Type 1 Diabetes

New technology has enabled scientists to prove that most people with Type 1 Diabetes have active beta cells, the specialised insulin-making cells found in the pancreas.

Camborne School of Mines celebrates 125 year anniversary

A centre of mining excellence which has pioneered the very best in industry-led teaching, research and technological advances is celebrating a truly special landmark. 

South, West and Wales consortium awarded £14.2m to nurture next generation of arts and humanities researchers

The South, West and Wales Consortium, in which the University of Exeter is joined with seven other universities – has been awarded £14.2 million funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC).

New article reveals why people with depression may struggle with parenthood

An article by researchers at the University of Exeter has shed light on the link between depression and poor parenting.

Killer whales may have menopause so grandma can look after the kids

Killer whales are just one of three species – we’re one of the others ‐ that continue to live long after they’ve stopped reproducing. 

Play your part to improve healthcare through research

In just 30 minutes, you could find out more about your health and contribute towards helping researchers make new discoveries to benefit others.

Infection connections: Badger surveillance project reveals how TB infects their social networks

Researchers at the University of Exeter and the AHVLA’s National Wildlife Management Centre have shown that the social lives of badgers are related to their risk of infection with bovine tuberculosis (TB).

Internet therapy may help postnatal depression

Researchers at the University of Exeter have teamed up with online forum Netmums in a pilot study which has shown that post natal depression can be treated effectively using online therapy.

Exeter water engineers collaborate with US researchers on global water issues

A new trans-Atlantic collaboration, ‘Clean Water for All’, will bring leading water engineers from the United States and the UK together to tackle problems of providing clean, sustainable water supplies.  

After the gold rush

New research suggests that 19th C. gold mining in California remains a major contamination risk. 

Melting Arctic sea ice could increase summer rainfall in northwest Europe suggests new study

A new study offers an explanation for the extraordinary run of wet summers experienced by Britain and northwest Europe between 2007 and 2012. 

New water-powered plant halves the cost of treating mine water

A new low energy mine water treatment plant promises a 50% reduction in the electricity costs of treating mine water.

Leading sociologist to give talk at University of Exeter

Professor Carol Smart, Co-Director of the Morgan Centre for the Study of Relationships and Personal Life and Professor of Sociology at the University of Manchester is coming to the University of Exeter to discuss her research into donor conception.

 

Stress makes snails forgetful

Snail study reveals that stress is bad for memory.

New research finds high tungsten levels double stroke risk

High levels of tungsten in the body could double the risk of suffering a stroke, a new study published in the open access journal PLOS ONE has found.

Cause of genetic disorder found in “dark matter” of DNA

For the first time, scientists have used new technology which analyses the whole genome to find the cause of a genetic disease in what was previously referred to as “junk DNA”.

Incredible ‘gannet cam’ captures birds’ eye view

Scientists from the University of Exeter and the RSPB have captured incredible footage of what it’s like to fly with the UK’s largest seabird.

Amazon rainforest more able to withstand drought than previously thought

New research suggests that the Amazon rainforest may be more able to cope with dry conditions than previously predicted.

Playing with future of British armed forces

Social scientists are to examine whether action figure dolls help form children’s opinions on war and have a role to play in shaping the future of our armed forces.

Global carbon emissions set to reach record 36 billion tonnes in 2013

Global emissions of carbon dioxide from burning fossil fuels are set to rise again in 2013, reaching a record high of 36 billion tonnes.

South West research alliance awarded NERC funding

The GW4+ alliance, a consortium of excellence in innovative research training led by the University of Bristol, has been awarded funding by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) for doctoral training.

Funding boost to train tomorrow’s engineers and scientists

Funding boost to train tomorrow’s engineers and scientists 

New book celebrates everyday repairs in the South West

A project led by two cultural geographers based at the University of Exeter’s Penryn Campus, and inspired by the practices of repair and renewal in the South West, is documented in a new book.

ADHD linked to social and economic disadvantage

Scientists have found evidence of a link between social and economic status and childhood attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the UK.

New GW4 studentships boost postgraduate training

Alliance pledges a further ten annual multidisciplinary studentships.

Lakes discovered beneath Greenland ice sheet

The subglacial lakes are the first to be identified in Greenland.

Microplastics make marine worms sick

Tiny bits of plastic rubbish could spell big trouble for marine life, starting with the worms.

Arctic study shows key marine food web species at risk from increasing CO2

A research expedition to the Arctic, as part of the Catlin Arctic Survey, has revealed that tiny crustaceans, known as copepods, that live just beneath the ocean surface are likely to battle for survival if ocean acidity continues to rise. 

"Clinical inertia" in Type 2 Diabetes revealed in new survey

Only half of patients with Type 2 Diabetes make the recommended lifestyle changes which could stop them developing complications, whilst physicians often delay escalation of treatment that may better control blood sugar.

Robot representatives open doors for the isolated

Psychologists from the University of Exeter are leading a major project looking at how robots can enable people to interact in public spaces – without actually being there.

Exeter research celebrated in Impact Awards

During a glittering ceremony last night in the Great Hall the winners of the University of Exeter Impact Awards 2013 were revealed.

UK Biobank study shows Dad’s influence on birth weight linked to diabetes genes

One of the first studies to use recently released data from the UK Biobank has provided the strongest evidence yet for a link between fathers’ diabetes and low birth weight.

Spiders partial to a side order of pollen with their flies

Spiders may not be the pure predators we generally believe, after a study found that some make up a quarter of their diet by eating pollen.

Autism paper makes top ten

A study led by a University of Exeter Medical School scientist has been highlighted as one of the top ten advances in autism research of 2013.