Research News

Research shows how buildings can better generate and retain energy

A PhD student has published new research into how improvements to Building Integrated Photovoltaic (BiPV) systems can mean more efficient, lower cost energy.

New study takes the shine off magpie folklore

Magpies are not attracted to shiny objects and don’t routinely steal small trinkets such as jewellery, according to a new study.

Epigenetic breakthrough bolsters understanding of Alzheimer’s disease

A team led by researchers at the University of Exeter Medical School and King’s College London has uncovered some of the strongest evidence yet that epigenetic changes in the brain play a role in Alzheimer’s disease.

Exeter psychologist gives expert evidence on head injury and re-offending link

A University of Exeter psychologist will today give evidence to the Justice Committee of the Scottish Parliament calling for recognition of the connection between head injury and re-offending.

New study reveals the effect of habitat fragmentation on the forest carbon cycle

Drier conditions at the edges of forest patches slow down the decay of dead wood and significantly alter the cycling of carbon and nutrients in woodland ecosystems, according to a new study.

Man-made noise makes fish more susceptible to predators

Despite their reputation as slippery customers, a new study has shown that eels are losing the fight to survive when faced with marine noise pollution such as that of passing ships.

Insights into predator vision revealed in ambitious field project

The question of how animals see, or what the world looks like through their eyes, has vexed and fascinated biologists for centuries. 

Penryn mathematicians help local magnet company attract international markets

A Falmouth company aims to beat off international competition by offering a more accurate method of characterising magnets for its global client base.

Research key weapon in government “war cabinet” to tackle antibiotic resistance

Research at the University of Exeter Medical School is part of an unprecedented cross council collaboration to tackle the rising threat of antibiotic resistance.

Link between vitamin D and dementia risk confirmed

Vitamin D deficiency is associated with a substantially increased risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease in older people, according to the most robust study of its kind ever conducted.

Primary care telephone triage does not save money or reduce practice workload

Demand for general practice appointments is rising rapidly, and in an attempt to deal with this, many practices have introduced systems of telephone triage. Patients are phoned by a doctor or nurse who either manages the problem on the phone, or agrees with the patient whether and how urgently they need to be seen.

Boat noise impacts development and survival of vital marine invertebrates

The development and survival of an important group of marine invertebrates known as sea hares is under threat from increasing boat noise in the world's oceans, according to a new study by researchers from the UK and France.

Bees able to spot which flowers offer best rewards before landing

Bumblebees are able to connect differences in pollen quality with floral features, like petal colour, and so land only on the flowers that offer the best rewards, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Exeter.

Major turtle nesting beaches protected in one of the UK's far flung overseas territories

Sea turtles are not a species one would normally associate with the United Kingdom. But on the remote UK overseas territory of Ascension Island, one of the world’s largest green turtle populations is undergoing something of a renaissance.

Problem drinking in midlife doubles chance of memory problems in later life

A study published today [Weds July 30] in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry indicates that middle-aged adults with a history of problem drinking are more than twice as likely to suffer from severe memory impairment in later life.

Noise pollution impacts fish species differently

Acoustic disturbance has different effects on different species of fish, according to a new study from the Universities of Exeter and Bristol which tested fish anti-predator behaviour.

£3.5 million for Exeter team’s national health technology assessment work

A team at the University of Exeter Medical School has been awarded £3.5 million to continue providing high-quality evidence to help the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) form key decisions on healthcare.

New device costing just £10 detects deadly lung disease

A scientist from the University of Exeter has developed a simple, cheap and highly accurate device for diagnosing a frequently fatal lung disease which attacks immune deficient individuals such as cancer patients and bone marrow transplant recipients.

Stress can make hard working mongooses less likely to help in the future

Researchers studying banded mongooses in Uganda have discovered that those who work hard to care for pups may be less likely to invest in future offspring in the same way due to elevated stress hormones.

Mapping legal crossroads of Empire summer exhibition

The Commonwealth Games is not the only one attracting a global audience, with the opening of an exhibition highlighting what was formerly the highest court of appeal for most colonies of the British Empire.

New report takes stock of jellyfish in UK seas

A new report by the University of Exeter and the Marine Conservation Society (MCS) takes stock of where and when UK jellyfish occur in UK seas for the first time in over 40 years.

Should we listen to our genes, or does mother know best?

Breaking the mould of inherited family characteristics could help you survive in a fast-changing world, scientists have discovered.

Age of puberty in girls influenced by which parent their genes are inherited from

The age at which girls reach sexual maturity is influenced by ‘imprinted’ genes, a small sub-set of genes whose activity differs depending on which parent passes on that gene, according to new research published today in the journal Nature

Cornish collaboration could revolutionise the market for electric vehicles

A new partnership between businesses and academics in Cornwall could revolutionise the way electric vehicles (EVs) are marketed in the UK.

Microplastics worse for crabs and other marine life than previously thought, study shows

The tiny plastic particles polluting our seas are not only orally ingested by marine creatures, but also enter their systems through their gills, according to a new study led by the University of Exeter.

Jerusalem Unbound: a City in Conflict

A new book, Jerusalem Unbound, plots the history and examines the underlying factors that make a peace agreement between Israel and the Palestinians so difficult.

Ipplepen Archaeological dig in the driving seat

A Roman road discovered on an archaeological dig has repairs to the road surface, showing that pot holes in Devon's roads are nothing new.

Exeter Science Park secures further links with the University of Exeter

The Exeter Science Park Company has strengthened its links with the University of Exeter through an agreement which will see the University’s innovation arm manage the new Science Park Centre.

Study reveals how gardens could help dementia care

A new study has revealed that gardens in care homes could provide promising therapeutic benefits for patients suffering from dementia.

Superheroes to the rescue, to religious education and beyond

A new initiative that uses superheroes to teach Religious Education at a school in Cornwall has won a national award.

Rediscovered World War One novel turned into play

A lost novel by a popular World War One soldier poet has been discovered in a garage and turned into a play which is soon to be performed at the Everyman Theatre, Cheltenham.

Feedback control could be key to robust conservation management

Mathematical algorithms used to control everyday household items such as washing machines could hold the key to winning the fight for conservation, a new study has claimed.

Researchers discover ‘Nano-pixels’ that promise thin, flexible high-res displays

A new discovery will make it possible to create pixels just a few hundred nanometres across that could pave the way for high-resolution low-energy flexible displays for applications such as ‘smart’ glasses, synthetic retinas, and foldable screens.

Science could help Cornwall lead the world in sustainable lobster fishing

Biologists from the University of Exeter’s Environment and Sustainability Institute at the Penryn Campus are assessing the impact of the National Lobster Hatchery’s activities on wild lobsters around Cornwall’s coast.

Rotten egg gas holds key to healthcare therapies

It may smell of flatulence and have a reputation for being highly toxic, but when used in the right tiny dosage, hydrogen sulfide is now being being found to offer potential health benefits in a range of issues, from diabetes to stroke, heart attacks and dementia.

Showcase highlighted innovation to improve healthcare and treatment

A wide range of research which is advancing knowledge on some of the greatest health challenges of our time was showcased at a dynamic event.

First scientific UAV facility in the UK launched in Cornwall

Cornwall is home to the UK’s first scientific facility dedicated to research involving Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), with a series of talks taking place on July 10-11 to mark the exciting launch.

‘Amazonian savannah’ supported ancient civilizations before rainforest took over

Large parts of the Amazon basin may have supported farming communities and looked more like open savannah than rainforest, prior to the arrival of Europeans in South America, scientists have found.

Business and bees could benefit from new research

Researchers from the University of Exeter’s Environment and Sustainability Institute (ESI) are collaborating with Cornwall’s leading vegetable growing company to increase its courgette yields by understanding more about how bees and other insects pollinate the plants.

Fal-moth study needs your garden

Falmouth residents are being sought by a student at the University of Exeter’s Penryn Campus who is conducting research into the causes of moth declines.

Regional weather extremes linked to atmospheric variations

Variations in high-altitude wind patterns expose particular parts of Europe, Asia and the US to different extreme weather conditions, a new study has shown.

Exeter scientist reveals secrets of Scotland’s basking sharks in new report

Seas between the islands of Skye and Mull on Scotland’s west coast are highly important for basking sharks, according to a report published today by Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH).

Exeter expert wins prestigious Physics award

A University of Exeter physics expert has been bestowed with a prestigious award, for his significant widening participation and outreach work.

Cornwall academic awarded medal for scientific contribution

Professor David Hosken from the Penryn Campus has been awarded a prestigious prize from the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) in recognition of outstanding scientific merit.

Exeter social scientists play leading role in major environmental assessment

Social scientists in Politics at the University of Exeter played leading roles in a major new assessment of UK environment resources

UK business incubator named number one in Europe

SETsquared has been ranked as the top university business incubator in Europe and second best in the world. 

WW1 soldier poet and composer Ivor Gurney shines bright at the BBC Proms

Archival research brings to light previously unheard, as well as rarely performed chamber, orchestral and choral works by World War One soldier, poet and composer Ivor Gurney.

Imagining the suburbs research event and book launch

The suburbs spread far and wide beyond city boundaries yet are rarely celebrated as places of cultural interest or excitement. 

Facial injuries and surgical advances exhibition

Soldiers in World War One with serious facial injuries are the catalyst for a research project and a new exhibition.

Exeter 6th in UK for most cited researchers says new global ranking

Eight University of Exeter academics feature in an authoritative new list of the most highly cited researchers, published this week by Thompson Reuters. This places Exeter 6th in the UK.

Arctic warming linked to fewer European and US cold weather extremes, new study shows

Climate change is unlikely to lead to more days of extreme cold, similar to those that gripped the USA in a deep freeze last winter, new research has shown.

Recreational football reduces high blood pressure in mature women

The World Cup in Brazil may be attracting a global armchair audience of millions, but new research has shown that playing football could help lower blood pressure in women aged 35-50.

Exeter academic wins most prestigious award for Higher Education teaching

A major education award that celebrates outstanding impact on the student learning experience and educational institutions has been awarded to a University of Exeter academic.

Scientists unravel the genetic secrets of nature’s master of mimicry

Scientists investigating how one of the greatest shape shifters in the natural world is able to trick predators to avoid being eaten have identified the gene behind the fascinating feat.

Earth’s breathable atmosphere a result of continents taking control of the carbon cycle, study suggests

Scientists investigating one of the greatest riddles of the Earth’s past may have discovered a mechanism to help determine how oxygen levels in the atmosphere expanded to allow life to evolve.

Mobile phones negatively affect male fertility, new study suggests

Men who keep a mobile phone in their trouser pocket could be inadvertently damaging their chances of becoming a father, according to a new study led by the University of Exeter.

New approach to writing changes policy and practice

A decade of research into the development of writing in school-aged children at the University of Exeter has shaped classroom practice in the teaching of writing and informed national and international policy. 

Building world-leading research communities

The first GW4 Alliance projects to receive funding to build research communities focused on tackling some of the world’s grand challenges, have been unveiled.

World Dementia Envoy opens Exeter health innovation hub

An award-winning centre which is cementing Exeter’s global reputation for health innovation has been officially opened by the World Dementia Envoy, Dennis Gillings, CBE, PhD.

Gone with the Wind 75th anniversary talk

The epic film Gone with the Wind marks its 75th anniversary this year. Scarlett O’Hara, the ultimate southern belle and heroine, forms the basis of a re-released book Scarlett’s Women: Gone with the Wind and its Female Fans which explores the film and why it appeals to a wide female fan base. 

Practical, affordable, management measures could accelerate the path to malaria eradication

The scourge of malaria could be curbed more rapidly in developing countries if governments and other partners adopted a series of measures to enhance program management, as outlined in a new paper by the University of California San Francisco, led by the University of Exeter’s Professor of Leadership, Jonathan Gosling. 

Gannet sat nav reveals impact of fishing vessels

Fishing vessels have a far bigger ecological footprint than previously thought, according to research which tracked the movement and behaviour of seabirds using GPS devices.

Student awarded prestigious Zonta International Amelia Earhart Fellowship

Mars spacecraft research lands Exeter student top international fellowship

Climate change and disasters discussed by Exeter academic at Hay Festival

The impact of weather-related disasters and how humans can prepare for climate change in the future will be discussed by a panel including Professor Katrina Brown of the University of Exeter’s Environment and Sustainability Institute (ESI) at the Hay Festival of Literature and the Arts this week.

BBC Radio 3 selects Exeter academics as new broadcasters

BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council’s (AHRC) nationwide search for academic broadcasters to turn ground-breaking ideas into fascinating programmes has been confirmed.

Exeter professor appointed to influential scientific advisory group

One of Exeter’s leading mathematicians has spoken of his “honour and delight” after being invited to join an influential science group, designed to develop, prioritise and fund strategic research.

Exeter scientists carry out pioneering analysis of four billion-year-old Mars meteorite

Scientists from the Camborne School of Mines have conducted a ground-breaking analysis of a Martian meteorite that dates back to the formation of the Earth.

Revolutionising Religious Education in schools

A new textbook has been written by University of Exeter academics which invites pupils to explore and interpret the meaning of biblical stories in a revolutionary new way.

Early warning system predicts dengue fever risk during the Brazil World Cup

University of Exeter scientists have helped develop an early-warning system to predict the risk of dengue fever outbreaks in Brazil during the forthcoming World Cup.

University of Exeter student crowned as ‘3 Minute Wonder’

A University of Exeter student has won a prestigious national competition designed to promote the pioneering work being carried out by early-career scientists to a wider audience.

Allotments yield healthier soil, study finds

The soils under Britain's allotments are significantly healthier than intensively farmed soils, researchers have found.

Scientists find best way to rid a garden of snails

Gardeners wanting to rid their spring flowerbeds of pesky snails can ditch the beer traps and egg shells and instead develop a strong throwing arm.

Exeter strengthens top ten position in The Complete University Guide

The University of Exeter is in the top ten of 123 UK universities for 2015 in the influential Complete University Guide, published yesterday.

Conference helps medics wake up to sleep disorders

Stephanie was an active single mum with a busy full-time job, when her life was unexpectedly derailed by a rare condition.

New £2 million partnership puts Exeter as research leader in Europe

The University of Exeter has announced a unique collaboration that will pioneer world-leading research to boost the effectiveness and safety of vital new drugs for both patients and the environment.

Exeter mathematician wins prestigious national science award

One of the University of Exeter’s foremost experts in climate dynamics has been honoured with a prestigious national science award.

Exeter evolutionary biologist receives European honour

Professor Nina Wedell has been elected to the membership of the European Molecular Biology Organisation (EMBO). 

All Party Parliamentary Group to study the benefits of bringing mindfulness into public policy

Ruby Wax will join experts and parliamentarians to launch an all party parliamentary group on mindfulness in the Houses of Parliament today.

Exeter to host first UK gathering of IPCC Fifth Assessment report authors

The world’s leading climate scientists will gather for an event to examine the future of climate change research following a major international report into the impacts, significances and implications of climate change.

Degraded coral reefs will threaten the livelihoods of fishermen

If coral reef health continues to decline, reefs of the future may not be able to support the food demands and livelihoods of millions of people living in the coastal tropics, according to new research from the Universities of Exeter and Queensland.

Exeter Biologist Elected Fellow of the Royal Society

Professor Nick Talbot of the College of Life and Environmental Sciences has been elected a Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), the premier scientific accolade in the United Kingdom.

How will climate change affect health in the UK?

A new research partnership to identify the effects of environmental change, including climate change, on health and wellbeing in the UK has been launched.

New funding to aid cancer bowel diagnosis in the young

The Department of Health has awarded funding for a new research project run by the University of Exeter and Bowel Cancer UK.

How Australia got the hump with one million feral camels

A new study by a University of Exeter researcher has shed light on how an estimated one million-strong population of wild camels thriving in Australia’s remote outback have become reviled as pests and culled on a large scale.

Research gives new insights into rare disease of the inner ear

A new study has shed light on the factors likely to lead to the development of a rare condition affecting the inner ear.

“Miracle treatment” families gather at Exeter centre of excellence

At five years old, Jack Neighbour’s neonatal diabetes health complications meant he had never spoken a word, and he communicated with his family through picture cards. Yet just six weeks after a genetic test by the team at the University of Exeter meant he could switch from insulin injections to tablets, he delighted his family by uttering his first words: the simple phrase “hello, mummy”.

Sexual conflict affects females more than males, says new research on beetles

Researchers at the University of Exeter have found that sexual conflict over mating impacts the parental care behaviour and reproductive productivity of burying beetles.

“Now is the time to act and establish a national service for diabetes prevention,” say academics

A major collaborative study into the prevention of diabetes by a team of academics from the University of Leicester and the University of Exeter has found that ‘half-hearted’ attempts to implement diabetes prevention guidance are much less effective than professionally developed, high-quality programmes.

Online Easter egg hunt helps scientists unlock secrets of camouflage

An online Easter egg hunt in which players act as ‘predators’ to find hidden bird eggs will help scientists better understand camouflage and its evolution.

Running geese give insight into low oxygen tolerance

A new study into how the world’s highest flying bird, the bar-headed goose, is able to survive at extreme altitudes may have future implications for low oxygen medical conditions in humans.

Flood prone communities in UK and Africa to share their stories through theatre

An ambitious project exploring the shared experiences of flood-hit and vulnerable communities in Cornwall and Kenya has been announced today, with the aim of building resilience for those affected by climate change and extreme weather events.

Surviving and thriving under climate change in the world’s deltas

Researchers from the University of Exeter are investigating the effect of climate change on deltas in South Asia and Africa to understand how people will respond and adapt.

Effect of important air pollutants may be absent from key precipitation observations

Pioneering new research from the University of Exeter could have a major impact on climate and environmental science by drastically transforming the perceived reliability of key observations of precipitation, which includes rain, sleet and snow.

Male extinction prevented by promiscuous females

Female fruit flies with a large number of sexual partners are playing an invaluable role in preventing the extinction of males, new research has shown.

Exeter plays significant role in new Centre for Doctoral Training

The University of Exeter will play a significant role in a new Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Centre for Doctoral Training in Sustainable Materials and Manufacturing.

Exeter plays part in crucial climate change task force

Academics from Geography at the University of Exeter have played an important role in The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)’s most recent report.

Blood test may help predict whether a child will become obese

Scientists have found that a simple blood test, which can read DNA, could be used to predict obesity levels in children.

Doctors raise blood pressure in patients

Doctors routinely record blood pressure levels that are significantly higher than levels recorded by nurses, the first thorough analysis of scientific data has revealed.

Pioneering research offers new insight into improved wave energy testing

Pioneering research could provide a significant boost in the vital quest to harness wave power as a viable renewable energy source for the future.

Awards success for ground-breaking diabetes researchers

Dr Richard Oram and Dr Angus Jones have won prestigious awards from the national charity Diabetes UK.

Cutting-edge health innovation centre will improve patient care

A newly-built £27.5 million health education and research centre is now open, streamlining the process from discovery to patient care.

Celebrating Research in Cornwall

A postgraduate research conference is being held at the University of Exeter’s Penryn Campus for the first time, demonstrating the breadth and impact of the work being carried out on emerging and important global issues in Cornwall.

New insight into the transport systems of cells

New insights into the basic operation of cells has been revealed in ground-breaking research carried out at the University of Exeter using a combination of advanced live-cell imaging, molecular genetics and quantitative analysis.

Global warming may increase methane emissions from freshwater ecosystems

New research led by the University of Exeter suggests that rising global temperatures will increase the quantity of the key greenhouse gas methane emitted from freshwater ecosystems to the Earth’s atmosphere – which could in turn lead to further warming. 

Politicians to be offered new service for tapping the latest academic research

A national consultation about a pioneering scheme to provide British politicians with unparalleled access to the very latest academic research has been launched.

First animals oxygenated the ocean, study suggests

The evolution of the first animals may have oxygenated the earth’s oceans – contrary to the traditional view that a rise in oxygen triggered their development.

Love or kill thy neighbour? New study into animal social behaviour

A theoretical study led by the University of Exeter has shed new light on the conditions that lead to the evolution of spite or altruism in structured populations.

Water racket - fish reactions to noise vary between species

Fish exposed to increased noise levels consume less food and show more stress-related behaviour, according to new research from the University of Bristol and the University of Exeter. 

Virtual bees help to unravel complex causes of colony decline

Scientists have created an ingenious computer model that simulates a honey bee colony over the course of several years.

New study combats depression in carers

Psychologists from the University of Exeter are trialling an innovative new type of support to help relatives and friends who care for stroke survivors – with studies showing that currently one in three become depressed or suffer other mental health problems.

Benefits of revolutionary energy Smart Grids could bypass consumers, new report warns

Hard-pressed consumers could miss out on benefits delivered by revolutionary energy smart grids unless they are clearly publicised and explained, a ground-breaking new study has said.

Study uncovers why almost winning is just as good for some gamblers

A new study led by the University of Exeter and Swansea University has pinpointed the changes in the brain that lead gamblers to react in the same way to near-misses as they do to winning.

Climate change won’t reduce deaths in winter

New research has found that climate change is unlikely to reduce the UK’s excess winter death rate as previously thought. The study is published in the journal Nature Climate Change and debunks the widely held view that warmer winters will cut the number of deaths normally seen at the coldest time of year.

Legal harvest of marine turtles tops 42,000 each year

A new study has found that 42 countries or territories around the world permit the harvest of marine turtles – and estimates that more than 42,000 turtles are caught each year by these fisheries.

Managed honeybees linked to new diseases in wild bees

Diseases that are common in managed honeybee colonies are now widespread in the UK’s wild bumblebees, according to research published in Nature.

Common medicines should mimic timing of body’s natural systems to prevent side-effects

Debilitating side effects associated with prescription medication for some of today’s most common conditions could be eradicated if they mimicked the body’s natural hormone secretion cycles, a new report has said.

‘Ground-breaking’ turtle study nets award for Tom

Unique research into endangered sea turtles, which will lead to a Caribbean government changing its conservation policy, has seen a student from the University of Exeter’s Penryn Campus recognised in a national competition.

Satellite tracking identifies Atlantic Ocean risk zones for leatherback turtles

The last large populations of the leatherback turtle are at risk because their migratory routes in the Atlantic Ocean overlap with the locations of industrial fisheries, a new study shows.

Hidden crop pest threat to poorer nations revealed

The abundance of crop pests in developing countries may be greatly underestimated, posing a significant threat to some of the world’s most important food producing nations, according to research led by the University of Exeter.

New book explores challenges for democracy in North Africa

The uncertainties surrounding the long-term prospect of democracy being fully embraced by North African nations embroiled in the Arab Spring rebellions are the focus of a fascinating new book. 

Peat bog restoration work holds back water

Restoration of peat bogs on Exmoor has resulted in a third less water leaving the moorland during heavy rainfall compared with three years ago, a new study involving the University of Exeter shows.

What the jackdaw saw - study shows birds communicate with their eyes

Researchers in Cambridge and Exeter have discovered that jackdaws use their eyes to communicate with each other – the first time this has been shown in non-primates.

Exeter climate change expert wins prestigious national science award

One of the University of Exeter’s foremost experts in climate change research has been honoured with a prestigious national science award.

£10 million boost for South West health research

A £10 million partnership in Devon, Cornwall and Somerset, which supports research with direct impact on patients' health and on improvements to the way in which NHS care is delivered, is to begin its next five year phase this month.

New app to monitor Ménière’s Disease launched

A new mobile app has been launched this week to help researchers develop a better understanding of a rare condition affecting the inner ear.

Astronomers research into exoplanets could hold key to riddle of Earth’s past

Pioneering research from University of Exeter scientists into the atmospheres of planets found beyond our own solar system could also help solve one of the greatest riddles of Earth’s past.

From Backbench to Lab Bench at the University of Exeter

Ben Bradshaw MP got a fascinating insight into science in his constituency when he visited the University of Exeter Medical School, as part of a unique ‘pairing’ scheme run by the Royal Society – the UK national academy of science.

Sensitivity of carbon cycle to tropical temperature variations has doubled, research shows

The tropical carbon cycle has become twice as sensitive to temperature variations over the past 50 years, new research has revealed.

Leading university researchers to deliver talks at local aquarium

Falmouth Aquarium, in collaboration with the University of Exeter, is hosting a series of public lectures from January which will see leading researchers discussing topical issues from climate change and food security to how we can reduce our own individual energy usage. 

Fungi are the rainforest 'diversity police'

A new study has revealed that fungi, often seen as pests, play a crucial role policing biodiversity in rainforests.

Schizophrenia in the limelight: film-industry technology provides insights into social exclusion

The first 30 seconds of a social encounter is crucial for people with symptoms of schizophrenia for establishing contact with people, according to new research carried out at Queen Mary University of London and the University of Exeter Medical School.

Glaciers existed in Britain as late as Georgian era

Research led by a scientist from the University of Exeter has shown that Britain was home to small glaciers within the last few centuries – around 11,000 years later than previously thought.

Researchers say polar bears are victims in public war of words

Polar bears and Inuit communities have become victims in the public war of words on climate change and wildlife conservation, according to researchers from Britain and Canada.

Global warming doubles risk of Extreme El Ninos, research shows

The risk of extreme versions of the El Niño weather phenomenon will double over the coming decades due to global warming, new research has shown.

Bat’s sea crossing is first from UK to mainland Europe

A tiny bat found in the Netherlands is believed to provide the first direct evidence that British bats migrate over the sea between the UK and mainland Europe.

Exeter scientist named in top 100

A psychologist who specialises in behaviour change has been named among the top 100 leading practising UK scientists, as drawn up by the Science Council.

Enormous scale of Nile 'mega lake' revealed

The eastern Sahara Desert was once home to a 45,000 km2 freshwater lake similar in surface area to the largest in the world today.

Legacy gift of £280,000 will help advance dementia research

Dementia research at the University of Exeter Medical School has received a boost in the form of a legacy gift of £279,933 from the late Michael Harnell.

Diabetes blood glucose targets are risk free, research shows

Diabetes research led by the University of Exeter Medical School has underlined the importance of people with diabetes achieving their blood sugar goals, to reduce the risk of complications.

Antarctic’s Pine Island Glacier in ‘irreversible retreat’

An international team of scientists has shown that Pine Island Glacier, the largest single contributor to sea-level rise in Antarctica, has entered a period of irreversible, self-sustained retreat and is likely to increase its discharge into the ocean in comparison to the last decade.

Cambodian villagers best placed to prevent illegal logging

A study into deforestation in Cambodia has found that forests are better protected when villagers are given the responsibility to manage them locally.

NHS cancer risk threshold ‘too high’ for patients, research indicates

Patients have expressed an appetite for potential cancer symptoms to be checked out much sooner than current NHS thresholds guidelines suggest, new research has revealed.

Artificially cooling planet would cause climate chaos, new research shows

Plans to reverse the effects of global warming by mimicking big volcanic eruptions would have a catastrophic impact on some of the most fragile ecosystems on earth, new research has shown.

Green spaces deliver lasting mental health benefits

Green space in towns and cities could lead to significant and sustained improvements in mental health, finds a new study published in the journal of Environmental Science & Technology.

University of Exeter joins BBC Stargazing Live event

Budding astronomers will be given a unique opportunity to witness the remarkable atmospheric properties of exoplanets when the BBC's hugely popular programme Stargazing Live returns for a new series this week.

Scientists discover new causes of diabetes

Research by the University of Exeter Medical School has revealed two new genetic causes of neonatal diabetes.

Research into fruit fly cells could lead to cancer insights

New research by scientists at the University of Exeter has shown that cells demonstrate remarkable flexibility and versatility when it comes to how they divide – a finding with potential links to the underlying causes of many cancers.

Autism paper makes top ten

A study led by a University of Exeter Medical School scientist has been highlighted as one of the top ten advances in autism research of 2013.

Spiders partial to a side order of pollen with their flies

Spiders may not be the pure predators we generally believe, after a study found that some make up a quarter of their diet by eating pollen.

UK Biobank study shows Dad’s influence on birth weight linked to diabetes genes

One of the first studies to use recently released data from the UK Biobank has provided the strongest evidence yet for a link between fathers’ diabetes and low birth weight.

Exeter research celebrated in Impact Awards

During a glittering ceremony last night in the Great Hall the winners of the University of Exeter Impact Awards 2013 were revealed.

Robot representatives open doors for the isolated

Psychologists from the University of Exeter are leading a major project looking at how robots can enable people to interact in public spaces – without actually being there.

"Clinical inertia" in Type 2 Diabetes revealed in new survey

Only half of patients with Type 2 Diabetes make the recommended lifestyle changes which could stop them developing complications, whilst physicians often delay escalation of treatment that may better control blood sugar.

Arctic study shows key marine food web species at risk from increasing CO2

A research expedition to the Arctic, as part of the Catlin Arctic Survey, has revealed that tiny crustaceans, known as copepods, that live just beneath the ocean surface are likely to battle for survival if ocean acidity continues to rise. 

Microplastics make marine worms sick

Tiny bits of plastic rubbish could spell big trouble for marine life, starting with the worms.

Lakes discovered beneath Greenland ice sheet

The subglacial lakes are the first to be identified in Greenland.

New GW4 studentships boost postgraduate training

Alliance pledges a further ten annual multidisciplinary studentships.

ADHD linked to social and economic disadvantage

Scientists have found evidence of a link between social and economic status and childhood attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the UK.

New book celebrates everyday repairs in the South West

A project led by two cultural geographers based at the University of Exeter’s Penryn Campus, and inspired by the practices of repair and renewal in the South West, is documented in a new book.

Funding boost to train tomorrow’s engineers and scientists

Funding boost to train tomorrow’s engineers and scientists 

South West research alliance awarded NERC funding

The GW4+ alliance, a consortium of excellence in innovative research training led by the University of Bristol, has been awarded funding by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) for doctoral training.

Global carbon emissions set to reach record 36 billion tonnes in 2013

Global emissions of carbon dioxide from burning fossil fuels are set to rise again in 2013, reaching a record high of 36 billion tonnes.

Playing with future of British armed forces

Social scientists are to examine whether action figure dolls help form children’s opinions on war and have a role to play in shaping the future of our armed forces.

Amazon rainforest more able to withstand drought than previously thought

New research suggests that the Amazon rainforest may be more able to cope with dry conditions than previously predicted.

Incredible ‘gannet cam’ captures birds’ eye view

Scientists from the University of Exeter and the RSPB have captured incredible footage of what it’s like to fly with the UK’s largest seabird.

Cause of genetic disorder found in “dark matter” of DNA

For the first time, scientists have used new technology which analyses the whole genome to find the cause of a genetic disease in what was previously referred to as “junk DNA”.

New research finds high tungsten levels double stroke risk

High levels of tungsten in the body could double the risk of suffering a stroke, a new study published in the open access journal PLOS ONE has found.

Stress makes snails forgetful

Snail study reveals that stress is bad for memory.

Leading sociologist to give talk at University of Exeter

Professor Carol Smart, Co-Director of the Morgan Centre for the Study of Relationships and Personal Life and Professor of Sociology at the University of Manchester is coming to the University of Exeter to discuss her research into donor conception.

 

New water-powered plant halves the cost of treating mine water

A new low energy mine water treatment plant promises a 50% reduction in the electricity costs of treating mine water.

Melting Arctic sea ice could increase summer rainfall in northwest Europe suggests new study

A new study offers an explanation for the extraordinary run of wet summers experienced by Britain and northwest Europe between 2007 and 2012. 

After the gold rush

New research suggests that 19th C. gold mining in California remains a major contamination risk. 

Exeter water engineers collaborate with US researchers on global water issues

A new trans-Atlantic collaboration, ‘Clean Water for All’, will bring leading water engineers from the United States and the UK together to tackle problems of providing clean, sustainable water supplies.  

Internet therapy may help postnatal depression

Researchers at the University of Exeter have teamed up with online forum Netmums in a pilot study which has shown that post natal depression can be treated effectively using online therapy.

Infection connections: Badger surveillance project reveals how TB infects their social networks

Researchers at the University of Exeter and the AHVLA’s National Wildlife Management Centre have shown that the social lives of badgers are related to their risk of infection with bovine tuberculosis (TB).

Play your part to improve healthcare through research

In just 30 minutes, you could find out more about your health and contribute towards helping researchers make new discoveries to benefit others.

Killer whales may have menopause so grandma can look after the kids

Killer whales are just one of three species – we’re one of the others ‐ that continue to live long after they’ve stopped reproducing. 

New article reveals why people with depression may struggle with parenthood

An article by researchers at the University of Exeter has shed light on the link between depression and poor parenting.

South, West and Wales consortium awarded £14.2m to nurture next generation of arts and humanities researchers

The South, West and Wales Consortium, in which the University of Exeter is joined with seven other universities – has been awarded £14.2 million funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC).

Camborne School of Mines celebrates 125 year anniversary

A centre of mining excellence which has pioneered the very best in industry-led teaching, research and technological advances is celebrating a truly special landmark. 

Insulin ‘still produced’ in most people with Type 1 Diabetes

New technology has enabled scientists to prove that most people with Type 1 Diabetes have active beta cells, the specialised insulin-making cells found in the pancreas.

Poetry is like music to the mind, scientists prove

New brain imaging technology is helping researchers to bridge the gap between art and science by mapping the different ways in which the brain responds to poetry and prose.

Giant channels discovered beneath Antarctic ice shelf

The 250 metre high channels will help predict future of Antarctic ice

Childhood disability research funded for six more years

Families who care for disabled children have welcomed the news that a group that specialises in childhood disability research will continue to receive funding to take it through to 2019.

Gathering information about food is not top priority for individuals with high metabolisms

New research has revealed that individuals with the highest metabolic rates within populations should be the least pre-occupied with keeping track of changes in their environments that could lead them to sources of food. 

Exeter climate scientists contribute to IPCC report

University of Exeter researchers have had a high profile role in creating the world’s most comprehensive report on climate change. 

Future sea level rises should not restrict new island formation in the Maldives

The continued accumulation of sand within the iconic ring-shaped reefs inside Maldivian atolls could provide a foundation for future island development new research suggests. 

Showcase celebrates interdisciplinary research project

A showcase has celebrated the end of a three year project that created a physical and virtual environment where researchers could trade ideas, find inspiration, and build new partnerships.

Maths predicts rise and fall of empires

Researchers have developed a new mathematical model that accurately describes the evolution of ancient empires.

Undersea mountains provide crucial piece in climate prediction puzzle

A mystery in the ocean near Antarctica has been solved by researchers who have long puzzled over how deep and mid-depth ocean waters are mixed.

Public involvement in research: Getting the measure of success

Universities in Lancaster, Liverpool and Exeter have joined forces with the public to produce an innovative resource to help researchers assess the impact of public involvement in research.

 

Health and environment data to be linked for the first time

A new £800,000 grant from the Medical Research Council will allow scientists to connect diverse databases and probe the links between climate, environment, and human health.

Bad news for prey: New research shows that predators can learn to read camouflage

Camouflaged creatures can perform remarkable disappearing acts but new research shows that predators can learn to read camouflage. 

Climate change will upset vital ocean chemical cycles

New research from the University of Exeter and the University of East Anglia (UEA) shows that rising ocean temperatures will upset natural cycles of carbon dioxide, nitrogen and phosphorous. 

Researcher enabling local business to diversify

A student from the University of Exeter Penryn Campus is helping a local company to branch out and further develop their business.

New technique to assess the cost of major flood damage to be unveiled at international conference

A new approach to calculating the cost of damage caused by flooding is to be presented at the International Conference of Flood Resilience: Experiences in Asia and Europe at the University of Exeter.

Research confirms Mediterranean diet is good for the mind

The first systematic review of related research confirms a positive impact on cognitive function, but an inconsistent effect on mild cognitive impairment. 

International experts to explore new “wonderdrug” at conference

A gas associated with the smell of rotten of eggs is now being proven to have widespread health benefits.

Spread of crop pests threatens global food security as Earth warms

A new study has revealed that global warming is resulting in the spread of crop pests towards the North and South Poles at a rate of nearly 3 km a year. 

Moss growth in Antarctica linked to climate change

Increases in temperature on the Antarctic Peninsula during the latter part of the 20th century were accompanied by an acceleration in moss growth, scientists have learned.

UK children less likely to be diagnosed with ADHD

New research suggests that children are far less likely to be diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the UK than they are in the USA.

Go on, volunteer – it could be good for you!

Volunteering may be good for your health, reveals a large systematic review and meta-analysis led by the University of Exeter Medical School.

Impact Awards deadline approaching

With the closing date of 13 September fast approaching, time is running out to enter this year’s Impact Awards.

US depression treatment proved effective for UK

A US model of treating depression through a network of specialists could effectively be imported into the UK, new research has revealed.

Research trial into snoring brings new hope for sufferers

The solution to the age old problem of snoring has been right under our noses all along: if you want a decent night’s sleep then sing for it.

£10 Million Boost to South West Health Research

A partnership that supports research in Devon and Cornwall with direct benefits to patients’ health and NHS care delivery has secured £10m in funding for the next five years.

Study links chemicals in our body with income

A new study published this week has found that the build-up of harmful chemicals in the body is affecting people of all social standings - not just those from economically deprived backgrounds as previously thought.

New Test to Predict Death Risk from C. difficile

Accurate, robust and simple method of identification has potential benefits to patients, hospitals and health services around the world.

Bacteria hold the clues to trade-offs in financial investments and evolution

Scientists have found that bacteria have the potential to teach valuable investment lessons.

Survey takes to the skies over SW England

The University of Exeter’s Camborne School of Mines (CSM) is working on an aerial survey, Tellus South West, with project leaders the British Geological Survey (BGS). 

€6.3m European Research Council success for Exeter five

Five early career academics from the University of Exeter are celebrating receiving European Grants worth a total of €6.3 million.

University of Exeter announces Strategic Partnership with IBM

The University of Exeter today announced that IBM (NYSE: IBM), the world's largest IT and consulting services company, will be one of the first University of Exeter Strategic Corporate Partners.

Excellent science for the environment links Plymouth Marine Laboratory and the University of Exeter

Two of the South West’s leading environmental research organisations will work much more closely to address some of the key questions facing the sustainable future of the ocean, which ultimately supports all life on Earth.

Exeter engineer elected to the Royal Academy of Engineering for 2013

Professor Dragan Savić, Head of Engineering at the University of Exeter, has been elected a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering (FREng), the highest honour for a UK engineer. 

Shifting patterns of temperature volatility in the climate system

In recent decades there has been increased variability in yearly temperature records for large parts of Europe and North America, according to a study published in the journal Nature

Study investigates extraordinary trout with tolerance to heavily polluted water

New research from the University of Exeter and King’s College London has shown how a population of brown trout can survive in the contaminated waters of the River Hayle in Cornwall.

Second year of basking shark tagging gets underway

The second year of a project to track basking sharks in Scottish waters is now underway.

Energy and cost saving in mines achieved by innovative technique from Camborne School of Mines

A new approach that will save energy and reduce ventilation costs in mines has been developed by the University of Exeter’s Camborne School of Mines. 

Hubble spots azure blue planet

True colour of exoplanet measured for the first time.

Ship noise impairs feeding and heightens predation risk for crabs

A study published in the journal Animal Behaviour found that the noise of passing ships disrupts feeding for the common shore crab. 

Further destabilisation in the Middle East possible according to new report

The crisis in Egypt is already having a negative effect on the Syrian civil war and contributing to further destabilisation of the wider Middle East according to a major new report. 

Blood pressure research wins National Prize

Research carried out at the University of Exeter Medical School on the monitoring of blood pressure has received the Royal College of General Practitioners Research Paper of the Year Award in the stroke category.

£50,000 for online documentary to explore risk

Exploring the idea of risk - in a short interactive documentary - forms the basis of a new project led by the University of Exeter in collaboration with viral advertising agency, Rubber Republic, Bristol. 

Office plants boost well-being at work

Office plants can assist in boosting staff well-being by up to 47% according to research carried out at this year’s Chelsea Flower Show.

Impact Awards key speaker announced

Top business woman Dame Stephanie ‘Steve’ Shirley has been confirmed as the keynote speaker for the 2013 Exeter Impact Awards.

Tailoring diabetes treatment to older patients yields dramatic results

More than a quarter of over 70s with type 2 diabetes could benefit simply from improving communication and education in the clinic, new research has revealed.

New South West Health Innovation network aims to improve region's healthcare

Transforming patient care and public health in Exeter for the better is the collective pledge of the new South West Health Innovation network.

Hubble Telescope reveals variation between hot extrasolar planet atmospheres

First results from the analysis of eight 'hot Jupiter' exoplanets suggest that winds and clouds play an important role in the atmospheric make up of these exotic planets. 

Mathematicians meet in Exeter to tackle challenging climate problems

Mathematicians, climate scientists and leading policy makers from across the world are gathering this week, 1 – 5 July 2013, at the University of Exeter and the Met Office HQ in Exeter to tackle the challenging problems that forecasting the weather and the climate bring.

Photos on social media used to measure aesthetic value of Cornish landscape

A new method designed to measure the aesthetic value of ecosystems has been applied in Cornwall.

New book explores relationship between photography, exploration, science and culture

Investigating the role of photography in scientific exploration.

Boat noise stops fish finding home

Boat noise disrupts orientation behaviour in larval coral reef fish, according to new research from the Universities of Exeter, Bristol and Liège.

Study reveals uncertainty over the benefits of feeding birds in winter

The results of a new study has found that feeding wild blue tits in winter resulted in less successful breeding during the following spring.

Mindfulness can increase wellbeing and reduce stress in school children

Mindfulness – a mental training that develops sustained attention that can change the ways people think, act and feel – could reduce symptoms of stress and depression.

Exeter scientists discuss seasonal variability at Met Office workshop

Researchers from the University of Exeter co-organised a workshop at the Met Office in Exeter to discuss the possible reasons for Britain and Europe's unusual seasonal weather over the past few years.

 

Older males make better fathers says new research on beetles

Mature males work harder and care less about female infidelity.

Rice blast research reveals details on how a fungus invades plants

A study by an international team of researchers has shed light on how the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae, invades plant tissue.

Physics student wins international research prize

Lachlan Marnham, 23, a PhD student in the Centre for Graphene Science, won the prize for best presentation at Graphene Week 2013 held in Chemnitz, Germany.

Advances in genetic sequencing diagnose Paralympic hopeful’s rare condition

National Paracycling Champion Tom Staniford has an extremely rare condition which, until now, has puzzled his doctors.

New research urges caution on use of peer support in chronic disease

Health organisations need to give careful consideration to schemes which encourage people with chronic diseases to seek support from peers, to avoid the potential negative effects, new research shows.

Study reveals significant leakage of carbon stored on land to rivers, lakes, estuaries and coastal regions

When carbon is emitted by human activities into the atmosphere it is generally thought that about half remains in the atmosphere and the remainder is stored in the oceans and on land. 

Timely new report on research impact gives guidance to institutions and funders

Ahead of this year’s Research Excellence Framework (REF) a team from the University of Exeter, funded by Jisc, have authored a report which gives guidance on the definition, evidence and structures required to capture research impacts and benefits.

British butterfly desperate for warm weather this summer

Butterflies are extremely sensitive to changes in temperature and new research has revealed that when summer weather turns bad the silver-spotted skipper battles for survival. 

Gannets don’t eat off each other’s plates

Colonies of gannets maintain vast exclusive fishing ranges despite doing nothing to defend their territory from rival colonies, scientists have discovered. 

Female company directors are better judges of longer-term company performance

Groundbreaking research by the University of Exeter Business School reveals that female company directors defy negative gender stereotyping by astutely valuing future company performance.

Personality is the result of nurture, not nature, suggests study on birds

Personality is not inherited from birth parents says new research on zebra finches.

University of Exeter professor named Institute of Physics president-elect

Professor Roy Sambles is to be the new president-elect of the Institute of Physics (IOP). 

Is enough being done to make drinking water safe?

There is a lack of evidence regarding the effectiveness of technologies used to reduce arsenic contamination finds research in BioMed Central’s open access journal Environmental Evidence.

Shedding light on moths: whiter street lighting attracts more moths, but some like it more than others

Like their more visible cousins the butterflies, moths are undergoing rapid population declines.

Molecular genetics researcher receives European honour

Professor Nick Talbot has been elected to the membership of the European Molecular Biology Organisation (EMBO).

New research discovers snail shell coiling programmed by protein patterning

Snail shells coil in response to a lopsided protein gradient across their shell mantles, suggests research in BioMed Central’s open access journal EvoDevo.

Exeter researchers work with Coca-Cola to transform home recycling

Researchers from the University of Exeter are working with Coca-Cola Enterprises (CCE) on a ground-breaking study with 20 households in Great Britain and France to observe at-home recycling behaviours. 

Supporting poor communities through ecosystem services in Mozambique and Kenya

A new project led jointly by the University of Exeter and the Stockholm Resilience Centre has been awarded £1.9 million by Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation.

Public creativity put to the test in Chelsea Flower Show psychology experiment

This year’s 100th Chelsea Flower Show will host an experiment to investigate whether office plants can be used to boost staff well-being and business profitability. 

Children of long-lived parents less likely to get cancer

The offspring of parents who live to a ripe old age are more likely to live longer themselves, and less prone to cancer and other common diseases associated with ageing, a study has revealed.

Children act on healthy living programme

Schools across Devon are becoming interactive theatres during a series of Healthy Lifestyle Weeks designed to formulate a programme which could ultimately be rolled out across all schools.

Why a little Beet It goes a long way

Athletes no longer ask whether beetroot juice improves sporting performance - they just want to know how much to drink, and when. A new study has the answers.

Study of the machinery of cells reveals clues to neurological disorder

Investigation by researchers from the University of Exeter and ETH Zurich has shed new light on a protein which is linked to a common neurological disorder called Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. 

Researcher working to boost Cornwall’s marine renewable energy industry

A Cornwall Campus student is collaborating with Falmouth Harbour Commissioners to investigate underwater noise and its effect on marine wildlife in Falmouth Bay.

Food security expert, Sarah Gurr, gives talk for Research Focus Week

Food security is a global issue which affects us all. From production to supply, feeding a rapidly expanding population requires cutting edge technology and complex logistical networks.

Astronomers find evidence of hungry young exoplanets

While astronomers now know that exoplanets are exceedingly common in the galaxy, the mechanics by which they are formed aren’t well understood. Planetary childhood remains a mystery.

Cardiff joins the Food Security Land Research Alliance

The Food Security Land Research Alliance (FSLRA) today (Friday 10 May 2013) announced that Cardiff University is to join the partnership.

Coral reefs' collapse isn't inevitable, researchers say

Coral reefs are in decline, but their collapse can still be avoided with local and global action.

Researcher engaging Cornish businesses with climate change

A researcher from the University of Exeter Cornwall Campus is striving to get more businesses to engage with climate change.

Queen's Award for Exeter spin-out

Simpleware, a company set up to commercialise EPSRC-supported research at the University of Exeter, has won The Queen’s Award for Enterprise in the International Trade Category.

Problematic pupil-teacher relationship could predict psychological problems

Problematic child-teacher relationships may be a predictor of psychological problems in later life, according to new research published online by the British Journal of Psychiatry.

Saturn’s youthful appearance explained

New research published in the journal Nature Geoscience has revealed how Saturn keeps itself looking young and hot.

World lobster experts gather in Cornwall

The University of Exeter Cornwall Campus has played host to a number of the world’s lobster experts at a recent marine crustacean knowledge exchange and networking event. 

Foul-smelling gas shows health benefits in reducing joint swelling

A gas associated with the smell of rotten eggs has proven to effectively reduce joint swelling, in research which could lead to advances in the treatment of arthritis.

Fish win fights on strength of personality

When predicting the outcome of a fight, the big guy doesn’t always win, suggests new research on fish. 

Battling with bugs to prevent antibiotic resistance

New scientific research published in the journal PLoS Biology shows that bacteria can evolve resistance more quickly when stronger antibiotics are used.

Epigenetic changes shed light on biological mechanism of autism

A University of Exeter Medical School scientist is part of a team to have identified patterns of epigenetic changes involved in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) by studying genetically identical twins who differ in autism traits.

Bugs produce diesel on demand

It sounds like science fiction but a team from the University of Exeter, with support from Shell, has developed a method to make bacteria produce diesel on demand. 

Green spaces may boost wellbeing for city dwellers

New research published in the journal Psychological Science has found that people living in urban areas with more green space tend to report greater wellbeing than city dwellers that don’t have parks, gardens, or other green space nearby.

Revolutionary new device joins world of smart electronics

Unique properties of graphene and graphExeter combine to create a new flexible, transparent, photosensitive device.

New research from the Centre for Innovation and Service Research identifies best practice in process redesign

There are many stories and anecdotes of world-class organisations that have been very successful in carrying out process redesign initiatives.

Air pollution stunts coral growth

A new study has found that air pollution can shade corals from sunlight and cool the surrounding water resulting in reduced growth rates.

Thinking you’re old and frail

Older adults who categorise themselves as old and frail encourage attitudinal and behavioural confirmation of that identity.

Predicting drought or rainfall in the desert

A new study by Professor Jim Haywood, from Mathematics at the University of Exeter, and colleagues suggests that sporadic volcanic eruptions in the northern hemisphere strongly influence the sea surface temperature and cause drought in the Sahel – the area of sub-Saharan Africa, just south of the Sahara desert. 

Exeter receives share of £84 million boost to PhD training

The Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) is this year investing £84.2 million in postgraduate training through its annual Doctoral Training Grants (DTGs).

Miniature aircraft could help scientific data take off

In their most basic form, remote-controlled aircraft are the perfect gadget-lover’s toy, but now their high-tech cousins have the potential to revolutionise the way ecological data are collected.

Meditation technique enhances children’s mental health

Teachers in schools across the globe are turning to a new philosophy to help improve the behaviour and well-being of students. 

Superfast model brain to predict flooding during heavy rain

Heavy rain has once again resulted in widespread flooding across the country. With climate change likely to cause further severe weather events in the coming years, methods of quickly predicting flooding will become increasingly important. 

Researchers discuss health and wellbeing at Parliament

A team of researchers has hosted a briefing to Parliament, focusing on the complex links between the environment and health.

Live tracking of vulnerable South Atlantic seabirds

Real-time information showing the locations of the threatened frigatebird is now available online thanks to a new Darwin Initiative funded study led by the University of Exeter and Ascension Island Government Conservation Department. 

Long predicted atomic collapse state observed in graphene

The first experimental observation of a phenomenon in quantum mechanics that was predicted nearly 70 years ago holds important implications for the future of graphene-based electronic devices.

Exeter student strikes gold with physics display in Parliament

Claire Woollacott, 24, a PhD Postgraduate Research Student from the School of Physics at the University of Exeter, struck gold at a competition in the House of Commons yesterday for excellence in her physics research, walking away with a £3,000 prize.

£1 million to investigate epigenetic factors in schizophrenia

Scientists will investigate the role of epigenetic processes in schizophrenia, a major cause of mental illness.

Scottish sharks to be tracked for a second year

Scientists are to extend a popular basking shark tracking project for another year, it was announced today.

Beetroot juice – the winning formula for team sports

New research shows that drinking beetroot juice can significantly improve performance in team sports involving bouts of high intensity exercise.

Brain study seeks answers on dementia

Research which seeks to understand how the brain’s electrical behaviour is linked to dementia could pave the way for better treatment of diseases such as Alzheimer’s.

European countries pool expertise to save water

Intelligent water monitoring systems could soon be in place across Europe thanks to iWIDGET, a €5 million European Commission project that will use cutting edge smart-metering technology to improve water use efficiency.

Bioscience to battle ash dieback

The University of Exeter is a member of a consortium awarded £2.4M by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) for urgent research into the ash dieback fungus and the genetics of resistance in ash trees.

International Women’s Day: Vodcast launched to boost numbers of female surgeons

A video podcast that aims to increase the number of women that embark on and succeed in surgical careers is being launched on International Women’s Day at the Royal College of Surgeons in London. 

Breast cancer technique to be tested on human breast tissue for the first time

A technique that could take away the anxious wait by patients for breast cancer results by removing the need for a needle biopsy is to have its performance evaluated for the first time, on breast tissue and lymph nodes.

Buoyant bronze age boat makes history in Cornwall

Today history was made in Cornwall as a unique project to recreate a 4000 year old boat reached its dramatic conclusion as it launched into the waters of Falmouth Harbour.

How birds of different feathers flock together

When different species of birds flock together, their flight formations are determined by social dynamics between and within species.

Lizards facing mass extinction

Climate change could lead to dozens of species of lizards becoming extinct within the next 50 years, according to new research published today.

Business School lecturer highly commended by leading academic publisher

Dr Stephen Jollands from the Business School has been given a Highly Commended Award in the 2012 Emerald/European Foundation for Management Development (EFMD) Outstanding Doctoral Research Awards.

£5 million to expand knowledge on human health, life and space

Grants totalling more than £5 million will allow world-class researchers at the University of Exeter to push the boundaries of knowledge in ground-breaking five year projects.

Combined expertise creates a hub of weather and climate excellence in Exeter

Since its move to Exeter, the Met Office’s partnership with the University has made Exeter an international hub of expertise in weather and climate research, with joint projects worth over £30 million in various stages of development.

Rising ocean acidity makes the effects of pollutants more damaging

Increasing levels of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere are changing ocean chemistry, making seawater more acidic.

Singles feel singled out

How come a wonderful person like you is still single? Research from the University of Exeter has revealed that single people feel worse about being single when they think about themselves as the odd ones out. 

Students inspired to engage with research

Medical Schools across the South West have teamed up to offer a scheme which aims to foster a research culture among doctors and dentists entering the NHS.

Lungs of the planet reveal their true sensitivity to global warming

Tropical rainforests are often called the “lungs of the planet” because they generally draw in carbon dioxide and breathe out oxygen.

New evidence highlights threat to Caribbean coral reef growth

Many Caribbean coral reefs have either stopped growing or are on the threshold of starting to erode, new evidence has revealed.

Bio-inspired fibres change colour when stretched

A team of materials scientists at Harvard University and the University of Exeter has invented a new fibre which changes colour when stretched. Inspired by nature, the researchers identified and replicated the unique structural elements, which create the bright iridescent blue colour of a tropical plant’s fruit.

South West research-intensive universities form grouping to bring together research strengths

The Universities of Bath, Bristol, Cardiff and Exeter today announced a formal collaboration, bringing together a high concentration of research expertise and capability in the South West of England and Wales.

How intermediate health and social care services enable better care closer to home

A new report by the University of Exeter Medical School researchers sheds light on how health and social care arrangements can avoid hospital admissions or enable people to leave hospital earlier.

Pigeon project highlighted on BBC’s Winterwatch

Many people view pigeons as pests, or even ‘rats with wings’ - but according to one student, they are ‘super doves’.

How does our brain “learn” from stressful events?

A study that aims to investigate how the brain processes stress and creates memories of psychologically stressful events will begin shortly thanks to funding of £758,000 from the Biotechnology and Biological Research Council.

Health and medicine showcase hailed a success

A dynamic event highlighted the wide range of medical and health research involving the University of Exeter, the NHS and business partners.

£1.1 million will help develop products from super-material

New ways of making and using the wonder material graphene will be identified through pioneering work by engineers and scientists at the University of Exeter and Bath.

Syria policy warning over weapons of mass destruction risk

Policy-makers have been warned that premature military action in Syria could lead to uncontrolled access to weapons of mass destruction and a prolonged, bitter insurgency following any intervention that resulted in the sudden collapse of the Syrian security forces. 

£1.5 million grant could help develop more robust water systems

A University of Exeter expert has been awarded a five-year fellowship grant for a green engineering research aimed at developing a new approach to water management in UK cities.

Badger sleeping habits could help target TB control

Sleeping away from the family home is linked to health risks for badgers, new research by the University of Exeter and the Food and Environment Research Agency (Fera) has revealed.

Birdsong bluster may dupe strange females, but it won’t fool partners

Male birds use their song to dupe females they have just met by pretending they are in excellent physical condition.

Group interaction among elderly is the key to significant health outcomes

The health benefits of 'water clubs' in care homes for the elderly, where residents gather together regularly to drink water, owe as least as much to the social nature of the activity as to the value of drinking water itself, an investigation by psychologists has shown.

Viruses cooperate or conquer to cause maximum destruction

Scientists have discovered new evidence about the evolution of viruses, in work that will change our understanding about the control of infectious diseases such as winter flu.

Vaccination reduces the risk of unvaccinated badger cubs testing TB positive

New evidence from a four-year field study has shown that BCG vaccination reduces the risk of tuberculosis infection in unvaccinated badger cubs in vaccinated groups, as well as in badgers that received the vaccine.

Cognitive behavioural therapy proves effective at reducing depression in people who have not responded to antidepressants

Antidepressants are the most widely used treatment for people with moderate to severe depression.

Top conservation issues to look out for in 2013

A UK-led team of researchers has identified 15 issues that could affect the diversity of life on Earth in 2013.

Ecologists shed new light on effects of light pollution on wildlife

Light pollution is often associated with negative effects on wildlife.

Blame, responsibility and demand for change following floods

New research shows that concerns about governmental failure to act effectively and fairly in the aftermath of extreme weather events can affect the degree to which residents are willing to protect themselves.

Poetry, photography, and procedures - the arts meet medicine

Preventive medicine, cancer and body image are the issues which will be explored in a creatively focused event at the University of Exeter on 27 November.  

£2 million research boost for Exeter scientists is part of major international push to help the world’s poorest farmers

University of Exeter scientists have received a £2 million boost to their efforts to tackle crop diseases that affect farmers globally – from Sub Saharan Africa to South West England.

Say hi to a magpie via new app

A new app which encourages people to say “good morning Mr Magpie” via their mobile phone will help scientists evaluate the benefits which birds bring to the quality of human life.

Teenagers urged to exercise to ward off bone disease

Playing football or running for at least three hours a week could help teenagers counteract the potential damage to their bone health caused by prolonged spells of sitting.

Streetlight policies could cast a shadow over wildlife

Scientists have conducted the first study into the ecological effects of a variety of energy-saving options to reduce overnight street lighting.

Cultural dimensions of climate change are underestimated, overlooked and misunderstood

The impact of climate change on many aspects of cultural life for people all over the world is not being sufficiently accounted for by scientists and policy-makers.

Methane from waste could power homes thanks to £4 million research

The UK could gain an edge in the race to become the most efficient converters of waste into energy when a £4million research project comes to fruition.

Inspirational Scientist wins European award for Communicating Research

A University of Exeter academic has been hailed as one of Europe’s best young researchers when she received an award in recognition of her work in making complex science easily accessible.

Grant award of €5 million will fund pioneering University research

Four of Europe’s most promising scientists from the University of Exeter have received a total of more than €5 million to advance cutting-edge research which will help develop a deeper understanding of the world.

Exeter scientist goes from lab bench to backbench

Dr Annette Plaut from the University of Exeter is swapping a lab coat for legislation as she visits Exeter MP Ben Bradshaw at the House of Commons.

American academic to assess impact of Frankenstorm

An American scientist at the University of Exeter is assessing the impact of the mega storm resulting from Hurricane Sandy as it rips through his homeland.

Exeter Scientists key to creating one of UK's greenest schools

Scientists at the University of Exeter have been heavily involved in developing a school which is in the national top ten for energy efficiency.

Research to reveal route to affordable, secure and sustainable energy

What is the best way for people in the UK to have access to affordable, secure and sustainable energy?

Twitter principles of social networking increase family success in nesting birds

New research carried out by scientists at Universities  in Exeter, France and Switzerland reveals for the first time the importance of social networking in producing a successful family.

University academic works with manufacturing giant on project to influence consumer recycling behaviour

Coca-Cola Enterprises (CCE) recently announced the details of a new project led by Dr Stewart Barr in Geography which will try to understand household recycling behaviours.

New report by Exeter academic identifies connection between brain injury and crime in young people

Psychology Professor Huw Williams has authored a major new report, published today, on the impact that acquired brain injuries can have on young people in childhood.

Breakthrough study identifies 'trauma switch'

Researchers from the University of Exeter Medical School have for the first time identified the mechanism that protects us from developing uncontrollable fear.

University hosts Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills

Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills Rt Hon Vince Cable has visited the University of Exeter’s Streatham Campus.

Pesticides not yet proven guilty of causing honeybee declines

The impact of crop pesticides on honeybee colonies is unlikely to cause colony collapse, according to a paper in the journal Science.

Exeter research reveals winning ingredient that can’t be beet

Athletes competing this summer have benefited from an unlikely ingredient to fuel their Olympic and Paralympic success.

Long menopause allows killer whales to care for adult sons

Scientists have found the answer to why female killer whales have the longest menopause of any non-human species - to care for their adult sons.

Exeter academics contribute to arts-science debate

Artists, scientists and policy makers will come together at the third Creative Coast Forum event at the University of Exeter on 10 September.

Blanket bogs need protection from climate change

Blanket bogs, which provide vital habitats for a unique range of plants, birds, small mammals, reptiles and amphibians, are at risk of declining as a result of climate change.

Firefighters to join the Exeter 10,000

Firefighters from Devon and Somerset Fire Service Red Watch have taken part in the Exeter 10,000 project, run by the National Institute for Health Research Exeter Clinical Research Facility (CRF), University of Exeter Medical School (formerly Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry). 

New physio guidelines for the elderly at risk of falls

Taking a fall in older life can not only result in injury, but also a potentially debilitating loss of confidence.

Menopause evolved to prevent competition between in-laws

The menopause evolved, in part, to prevent competition between a mother and her new daughter-in-law, according to research published in the journal Ecology Letters.

Research identifies mechanism responsible for eye movement disorder

A research team from King’s College London and the University of Exeter Medical School has identified how a genetic mutation acts during the development of nerves responsible for controlling eye muscles, resulting in movement disorders such as Duane Syndrome, a form of squint.

Warming causes more extreme shifts of the Southern Hemisphere's largest rain band

South Pacific countries will experience more extreme floods and droughts, in response to increasing greenhouse gas emissions, according to a paper in the journal Nature.

Research links Bisphenol-A to narrowing of the arteries

A research team from the Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry (PCMD), University of Exeter, and University of Cambridge has for the first time established a link between high levels of urinary Bisphenol-A (BPA) and severe coronary artery stenosis (narrowing of the arteries).

Study proves that one extinction leads to another

When a carnivore becomes extinct, other predatory species could soon follow, according to new research.

Exeter professor's double accolade for nursing science

A University of Exeter professor has been elected President of the European Academy of Nursing Science.

Exeter geographers collaborate with artists on the Jurassic Coast

University of Exeter geographers have helped shape a series of new artworks and special free events for visitors to Hive Beach, Dorset, to enjoy this summer.

Coral reef thriving in sediment-laden waters

Rapid rates of coral reef growth have been identified in sediment-laden marine environments, conditions previously believed to be detrimental to reef growth.

Obama needs to show Americans he's still 'one of them'

To win a second term in office, President Obama needs to persuade voters that he is still 'one of them' – and recapture some of the charisma that helped propel him to the top four years ago.

Dairy cows' health and productivity set to benefit from Exeter study

University of Exeter scientists are undertaking the first ever study of its kind to investigate how the way dairy cows interact with one another impacts on their health and productivity.

Exeter physicist bends light waves on surfboards

A University of Exeter scientist is bringing together his passions for physics and surfing with research that could inspire a host of new technologies.

Snacking and BMI linked to double effect of brain activity and self-control

Snack consumption and BMI are linked to both brain activity and self-control, new research has found.

Binge drinking increases risk of cognitive decline in older adults

Researchers from the Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry (PCMD), University of Exeter, will present the findings of a new study suggesting a link between binge drinking in older adults and the risk of developing dementia.

Largest analysis of public opinions at outbreak of World War I challenges popular myth

A groundbreaking book presents new evidence that challenges the way we understand British and Irish responses to the outbreak of the First World War in 1914.

University scientists to reveal the secret life of sharks

University of Exeter scientists are part of a team investigating the movements of large sharks visiting Scottish waters.

New research shows agri-environment schemes improved by training

A research programme exploring the effectiveness and value for money of agri-environment schemes found that a relatively small amount of training for farmers could significantly improve their environmental outcome.

Helping family is key for social birds

Social birds that forgo breeding to help to raise the offspring of other group members are far more likely care for their own close relatives than for more distant kin, a new study has found.

Exeter physicist awarded Faraday Medal

A physicist whose University of Exeter career spans 40 years has been awarded the Faraday Medal of the Institute of Physics.

Research paves the way for accurate manufacturing of complex parts for aerospace and car industries

Producing strong, lightweight and complex parts for car manufacturing and the aerospace industry is set to become cheaper and more accurate thanks to a new technique developed by engineers from the University of Exeter.

Responsibility misused by politicians

The concept of responsibility is being used by politicians as a distraction from the real problems in society, which have to do with inequality according to research from the University of Exeter.

Dramatic change spotted on a faraway planet

A University of Exeter scientist is part of a team of astronomers that has seen dramatic changes in the upper atmosphere of a faraway planet, using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.

Major changes critical for Energy Bill and Green Deal to succeed

The University of Exeter, SSE, Consumer Focus and WWF, along with representatives from 20 other organisations, have published the results of a series of roundtables on UK energy policy.

Marine energy doubled by predicting wave power

The energy generated from our oceans could be doubled using new methods for predicting wave power.

University of Exeter boosts research in disease prevention and treatment

The University of Exeter is furthering our understanding of the causes and treatments of diseases.

University of Exeter invites artists to work in 3D

The University of Exeter’s Centre for Additive Layer Manufacturing (CALM) has teamed up with the Exeter Phoenix to offer 30 artists from across the South West the opportunity to explore the possibilities of making work in the emerging technology of 3D printing.

University of Exeter research uncovers rice blast infection mechanism

Scientists at the University of Exeter have made a new discovery that they hope might lead to effective control of rice blast disease.

Eat less meat and improve farming efficiency to tackle climate change

We need to eat less meat and recycle our waste to rebalance the global carbon cycle and reduce our risk of dangerous levels of climate change

Training people to inhibit movements can reduce risk-taking

New research from psychologists at the Universities of Exeter and Cardiff shows that people can train their brains to become less impulsive, resulting in less risk-taking during gambling.

Ancient story of Dartmoor tors has an ice-cold twist

Ice extended further across the UK than previously thought and played a part in sculpting the rocky landscape of Dartmoor in South West England during the last Ice Age, according to new research which challenges previously held theories.

Attitude towards age increases risk of dementia diagnosis

Our attitude towards our age has a massive impact on the likelihood of being diagnosed with dementia.

University scientists develop new tools for conservation and wildlife management

A University of Exeter team has developed new software tools for helping prioritise efforts in species conservation.

Exeter scientist plunges school pupils into marine science

University of Exeter biologist Dr Ceri Lewis is supporting a national campaign to get marine science on the agenda of Britain’s schools.

UK study into whether physical activity aids depression finds no additional benefit

Current clinical guidance recommends physical activity to alleviate the symptoms of depression.

'Jack Spratt' diabetes gene identified

Type 2 diabetes is popularly associated with obesity and a sedentary lifestyle. However, just as there are obese people without type 2 diabetes, there are lean people with the disease.

South West food security research boosted by 'globally unique' farm facility

Ambitions to make the South West of England a centre of global significance in the arena of food security and land research have been boosted thanks to a state-of-the-art farm research facility in North Devon.

Renewable Energy students help Guernsey develop renewable energy strategy

Renewable Energy academics and students from the Cornwall Campus, near Falmouth recently visited Guernsey on a field trip to make a high level strategic assessment of the island's renewable energy potential.

Exeter researchers awarded prestigious fellowships

The Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) has today announced the recipients of its first ever Fellowships in Manufacturing.

Light pollution transforming insect communities

Street lighting is transforming communities of insects and other invertebrates, according to research by the University of Exeter.

The heart rules the head when we make financial decisions

Our ‘gut feelings’ influence our decisions, overriding ‘rational’ thought, when we are faced with financial offers that we deem to be unfair, according to a new study.

£30,000 award to South West sea-life scientist

HRH The Princess Royal (Princess Anne) has presented a Whitley Award for inspirational conservation leadership to University of Exeter research fellow Joanna Alfaro Shigueto for her work to build a better future for Pacific coast wildlife and fishing communities.

Exeter professors win research prizes from the Royal Meteorological Society

Professor David Stephenson and Professor Jim Haywood in Mathematics at the University of Exeter have won prestigious research prizes from the Royal Meteorological Society.

University scientist joins international team to sequence butterfly genome

A University of Exeter scientist has joined a landmark effort to sequence the genome of a South American butterfly.

First satellite tag study for manta rays reveals habits and hidden journeys of ocean giants

Using the latest satellite tracking technology, conservationists from the Wildlife Conservation Society, the University of Exeter and the Government of Mexico have completed a ground-breaking study on a mysterious ocean giant: the manta ray.

International research team unravels origin of devastating kiwifruit disease

An international research team including an Exeter scientist has used the latest DNA sequencing technology to trace a devastating pathogen back to its likely origin of China.

Exeter scientist wins Rosenhain Medal

University of Exeter physicist Professor Steve Eichhorn has won the Rosenhain Medal in recognition of his distinguished achievement in materials science.

New graphene-based material could revolutionise electronics industry

The most transparent, lightweight and flexible material ever for conducting electricity has been invented by a team from the University of Exeter.

Birds cultivate decorative plants to attract mates

An international team of scientists has uncovered the first evidence of a non-human species cultivating plants for use other than as food.

Spin-out wins Queen's Award for Enterprise in Innovation

University of Exeter spin-out company Simpleware Ltd has been awarded a Queen’s Award for Enterprise in Innovation for its new approach to converting 3D image data into high-quality computer models (CAD, Rapid Prototype, CFD and Finite Element models).

Green-glowing fish provides new insights into health impacts of pollution

Understanding the damage that pollution causes to both wildlife and human health is set to become much easier thanks to a new green-glowing zebrafish.

University researcher reaches finals of prestigious global competition

Joanna Alfaro-Shigueto, from Lima (Peru) has been named as a finalist in one of the world’s most prestigious wildlife conservation competitions - the Whitley Awards.

Exhibition reveals South West's repair industries as threatened and thriving

An exhibition offering a unique insight into the business of repairing everyday objects opens at the University of Exeter on 11 April.

800-year-old farmers could teach us how to protect the Amazon

In the face of mass deforestation of the Amazon, we could learn from its earliest inhabitants who managed their farmland sustainably.

Exeter to become catalyst for engaging research

The University of Exeter has been awarded £300,000 to become a centre of excellence for public engagement in research.

Local schools trial radical new approach to Easter story

Six local schools are changing the way in which Religious Education is taught, thanks to a pioneering new approach to learning developed by researchers from the University of Exeter’s Graduate School of Education.

Exeter team to adapt weather forecasting for Exoplanets

A University of Exeter team is adapting the UK Met Office’s weather and climate model to study the atmospheric properties of planets orbiting other stars.

New £3.6 million mood disorders research facility opens its doors

The South West region is set to benefit from a new £3.6 million building dedicated to researching treatments for mood disorders such as depression and Bipolar Disorder.

Marine Protected Areas are keeping turtles safe

Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) are providing sea turtles with an ideal habitat for foraging and may be keeping them safe from the threats of fishing.

Bilingual education works – if you do your homework

More schools should consider adopting bilingual education for part of their teaching, according to a language education expert from the University of Exeter.

Exeter professor contributes to national literacy debate

An academic from the University of Exeter’s Graduate School of Education has contributed to a national debate on how we can improve literacy among school children.

Aerial survey reveals Exmoor's rare peatlands as never seen before

An unmanned aircraft has captured hundreds of images of Exmoor’s peatlands, revealing the condition of this rare environment as never seen before.

University team to lead project to safeguard Ascension Island's wildlife

A University of Exeter team will deliver an ambitious programme to protect the unique flora and fauna of Ascension Island.

Over £5.7m to support groundbreaking research in Devon

Over £5.7 million will be invested in NHS Clinical Research Facilities to understand disease process and assist development of new treatments to benefit patients in Devon.

Ice Age mariners from Europe were among America's first people

Some of the earliest humans to inhabit America came from Europe according to a new book.

Stock market stereotypes undervalue female directors in the short-term

New research into how the stock market perceives the capabilities of female company directors finds that an initial negative response by investors is overturned in the longer term, once markets respond to corporate performance rather than stereotypes.

Health and Social Care Bill may compromise patient safety says Business School academic

A former NHS hospital Chief Executive and now senior academic at the University of Exeter Business School, has warned that patient safety may worsen if the Health and Social Care Bill is passed in its current form.

Operational Research seeks benefit for stroke victims

Researchers from the University of Exeter, Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry (PCMD), are working with clinicians to reduce the time it takes from the start of a stroke to the administration of vital clot-busting drug treatment.

Centre for Sport Leisure and Tourism Research announces London showcase event

Researchers from the Centre for Sport Leisure and Tourism Research (CSLTR) will be showcasing their latest findings in a high profile event in London on Monday April 23 2012.

Exeter scientists illustrate plant communication in landmark BBC series

The University of Exeter has contributed to a new BBC Two series, by conducting an experiment that visualises communication between plants.

First plants caused ice ages

New research reveals how the arrival of the first plants 470 million years ago triggered a series of ice ages.

Review suggests differences in blood pressure between arms could indicate vascular risk

A systematic review and meta-analysis carried out by researchers at the University of Exeter Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry (PCMD), has found that differences in systolic blood pressure between arms could be a useful indicator of the likelihood of vascular risk and death.

Violins 'printed' in Exeter

The University of Exeter’s new Centre for Additive Layer Manufacturing (CALM) is set to make some noise in the classical music world by ‘printing’ two violins.

Exeter research highlights importance of Cornwall's food and drink industry

Research on the agriculture and food and drink of Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly confirms just how vital these industries are to the area

Turtles’ mating habits protect against effects of climate change

The mating habits of marine turtle may help to protect them against the effects of climate change, according to new research led by the University of Exeter.

Exeter expert examines China on the Big Screen

The role of Chinese cinema in shaping China's image is being explored in a new project.

Gene research sheds light on timing of menopause

An international team of researchers has discovered 13 new regions of the genome associated with the timing of menopause.

Research reveals power of the subconscious on human fear

The human subconscious has a bigger impact than previously thought on how we respond to danger, according to research led by the University of Exeter.

What do sunsets look like from other planets?

A University of Exeter astrophysicist has shown what sunsets look like on planets outside our solar system.

University and Netmums join forces to tackle postnatal depression

The University of Exeter and parenting website Netmums are developing a new online therapy programme for postnatal depression.

Unlocking Cornwall's Bronze Age past

A modern day boat builder is being challenged to recreate the oldest boat ever found in western Europe, dating to around 2000 BC.

£20 million centre will advance disease treatment

The University of Exeter has announced plans to develop a £20 million interdisciplinary research centre to understand how cells operate and how diseases are caused.

Cefas and the University of Exeter sign strategic alliance

The Centre for Environment, Fisheries & Aquaculture Science (Cefas) and the University of Exeter have sealed a strategic collaboration.

Predators hunt for a balanced diet

Predators select their prey in order to eat a nutritionally balanced diet and give themselves the best chance of producing healthy offspring.

Timely ends: telomere length in early life predicts lifespan

New research by a team from the Universities of Glasgow and Exeter shows that a good indicator of how long individuals will live can be obtained from early in life using the length of specialised pieces of DNA called telomeres. 

Research on transitional justice in Bosnia and Herzegovina wins major prize

University of Exeter politics lecturer Lara Nettelfield’s book, Courting Democracy in Bosnia and Herzegovina: The Hague Tribunal’s Impact in a Postwar State has won the prestigious Marshall Shulman book prize.

Academic shortlisted for major history award

University of Exeter historian Dr James Mark’s book: The Unfinished Revolution Making Sense of the Communist Past has been shortlisted for the prestigious Longman History Today prize. 

University and Geological Survey join together in a critical alliance

In response to growing unease over supply of critical metals for high-tech manufacturing and green technologies, the British Geological Survey (BGS) and the University of Exeter have agreed to join forces in a new initiative to improve research capability in this vital area.

What is the real meaning of Christmas?

There are thousands of stories in the Bible and a visual artist in Exeter is currently on a 30-year mission to paint the whole lot.

World-class biosciences building

Biologists can now visit any aquatic environment in the world, without leaving Exeter.

A study of corporate directing - 25 years on

Corporate directing in the UK has radically changed over the last 24 years yet some board conduct, such as the persistent under-representation of women on boards, has only changed marginally, a unique series of ESRC-funded studies reveals.

First Exeter Impact Awards – winners announced

During a glittering ceremony last night in the Great Hall, the winners of the inaugural University of Exeter Impact Awards were revealed.

Short walk cuts chocolate consumption in half

A 15-minute walk can cut snacking on chocolate at work by half, according to research by the University of Exeter.

Female fish choose attractive friends to avoid attention

Scientists have observed a strategy for females to avoid unwanted male attention: choosing more attractive friends.

Unique art-science experiment conducted in Cornwall and Iceland

A new book – Six Days in Iceland – is the result of collaboration between a poet and Geography staff and students at the University of Exeter Cornwall Campus.

Trauma drug first for civilian ambulance service

A drug currently used to reduce bleeding in operating theatres and in trauma in the armed forces is set to be used by a civilian ambulance service for the first time.

Research shows high food inflation mean poorest families hardest hit this Christmas

High food prices are driving overall inflation in the UK and hitting the pockets of the poorest in the country hardest over the Christmas period, research from the University of Exeter Business School and Nottingham University has shown.

Surgeons perform better with eye movement training

Surgeons can learn their skills more quickly if they are taught how to control their eye movements.

Exeter study inspires new brain injuries interest group

Research by a University of Exeter psychologist has inspired a group of charities and pressure groups to establish a new consortium, focused on the effects of brain injuries.

World-class professors will help Cornwall take centre stage for environmental research

A trio of renowned professors will move to Cornwall following an international hunt for academics of the highest calibre to establish the region as a world-leading centre for environmental research.

Limited options for meeting 2°C warming target, warn climate change experts

We will only achieve the target of limiting global warming to safe levels if carbon dioxide emissions begin to fall within the next two decades and eventually decrease to zero.

Training in 'concrete thinking' can be self-help treatment for depression

New research provides the first evidence that depression can be treated by only targeting an individual’s style of thinking through repeated mental exercises in an approach called cognitive bias modification.

Exeter Impact Awards shortlist announced

The shortlist for the inaugural Exeter Impact Awards has been announced.

Scientists defuse the Vietnam time bomb

A key mechanism by which a bacterial pathogen causes the deadly tropical disease melioidosis has been discovered by an international team, including a University of Exeter scientist.

Falmouth set to host wave energy test site

Falmouth Harbour Commissioners (FHC) and The Crown Estate have signed a lease to create FabTest, a new wave energy ‘nursery’ test site in Falmouth Bay on the south coast of Cornwall.

UK scientists come together to help feed the 7 billion

The Universities of Exeter and Bristol, in partnership with Rothamsted Research have officially joined forces to tackle one of the biggest challenges facing humanity: how can we sustainably feed a growing population?

Clustered hurricanes reduce impact on ecosystems

New research has found that hurricane activity is 'clustered' rather than random, which has important long-term implications for coastal ecosystems and human population. 

Global partnership for South West clinical trials

Clinical trials and research centres across the South West have come together to form a partnership with Quintiles, the world’s leading biopharmaceutical service organisation, to create the Peninsula Prime Site.

Exeter leads search for intelligent computer

The University of Exeter will lead the search for an intelligent computer when it hosts the 2011 Loebner Prize on Wednesday 19 October.

Low carbon project scoops national award

It was recently announced that the ‘Clear About Carbon’ project involving academics from the University of Exeter Business School is a joint winner of the 2011 European Social Fund (ESF) Sustainable Development Specialist Project Leader Awards.

Is chivalry the norm for insects?

The long-standing consensus of why insects stick together after mating has been turned on its head by scientists from the University of Exeter.

£19 million research centre on RD&E site receives go ahead

A £19 million research centre at the RD&E Wonford site has been given the green light by city planners.

New buildings will be safer in the heat thanks to climate change study

New buildings should be safer in hot weather, thanks to research led by the University of Exeter.

Events celebrate shared experiences of place

A day of eclectic events will mark the culmination of a major project on how people relate to the places where they live, or have lived in the past and the journeys between them, real and imagined.

Study finds decline in dolphins around Cornish coast

The number of bottlenose dolphins around Cornwall’s coast could be declining according to a new study by the University of Exeter and Cornwall Wildlife Trust.

Could football give homeless men a health kick?

Playing street football two or three times a week could halve the risk of early death in homeless men.

Blue of every hue

The compelling story of indigo, the world’s oldest, most magical and best-loved dye has been brought to life by an Honorary Research Fellow from the University of Exeter’s Institute of Arab and Islamic Studies. 

Britain’s wildlife will benefit from better coastal structures

Plants and animals that live on Britain’s coasts could benefit from changes to the way coastal structures such as seawalls, breakwaters, rock armour and jetties are designed and built.

Minister of State for Universities and Science visits Exeter

Minister of State for Universities and Science David Willetts MP visited the University of Exeter’s Streatham Campus on Monday 26 September.

Visiting the past at Calstock Roman Fort

The opportunity for the public to learn more about Calstock Roman Fort in Cornwall will be possible on Saturday 8 and 15 October in the form of special open days. 

‘Heat-proof’ eggs help turtles cope with hot beaches

Sea turtles face an uncertain future as a warming climate threatens to reduce their reproductive viability.

Exeter physicist advances early universe theory

Research by a University of Exeter astrophysicist has helped to explain how the first stars and galaxies formed.

Exeter celebrates 25 years of leading children’s health and exercise research

The University of Exeter is marking a quarter of a century of leading research into children’s health and wellbeing by hosting the world’s biggest and most prestigious paediatric exercise and health conference.

Exeter student sheds new light on social life of bats

Ecologists are getting a unique and unexpected insight into the private lives of bats thanks to a University of Exeter PhD student.

University invites businesses to the future of manufacturing

Businesses that are producing prototypes and developing products can now benefit from a pioneering £2.6 million facility at the University of Exeter.

Golding centenary celebrations in home county

The centenary of the birth of Cornwall’s most famous literary son, the author William Golding, will be marked by a major international conference at the University of Exeter’s Tremough Campus, Penryn 16 – 18 September. 

Exeter academics contribute to local literary festival

A fashionable coastal town in Devon is hosting a literary festival from 16 – 18 September, to celebrate great literature, support and showcase new talent, and promote reading and writing. 

Exeter academic explains chemical ‘risk list’

A University of Exeter academic has spoken about the many chemical elements we rely on that are at risk.

Inaugural awards seek student and staff nominations

Staff and students are being urged to submit their nominations for the first Exeter Impact Awards.

Scientists simulate seashells’ structures

Scientists have successfully created synthetic crystals whose structures and properties mimic those of naturally-occurring biominerals such as seashells.

Counter terrorism research published

On the eve of the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attack, an expert in counter-terrorism from the University of Exeter has published a book Countering al Qaeda in London: Police and Muslims in Partnership.

Pupils taught to love grammar get better results

Teaching grammar to pupils ‘playfully’ improves their writing capabilities substantially, groundbreaking University of Exeter research has shown.

Exeter leads the way in the history of medicine

The Oxford Handbook of The History of Medicine is the first large scale review of the field to be published in over twenty years. 

Engineers find leaky pipes with Artificial Intelligence

University of Exeter engineers have pioneered new methods for detecting leaky pipes and identifying flood risks with technologies normally used for computer game graphics and Artificial Intelligence.

Re-emergence of salmon in the Thames ‘not from restocking’ say Exeter academics

The recent returns of Atlantic salmon in the Thames are more likely to be a result of fish straying from nearby rivers rather than a consequence of expensive restocking efforts, according to new research by the University of Exeter.

Top of class for primary teacher training

The University of Exeter is the best in the country for primary teacher training according to the Good Teacher Training Guide 2011.

Females choose mates for their personalities, study shows

Adventurous females choose mates with similar personalities, regardless of the male’s appearance and other assets, according to research led by the University of Exeter.

Education under the microscope at major international event

International education experts from 40 different countries will be meeting at the largest educational conference of its kind in Europe. 

Creative industries in £16million funding boost

The University of Exeter is to play a key part in a new Knowledge Exchange Hub which has been established to boost the region’s creative economy.

International team to use Hubble Space Telescope to answer key astronomy questions

An international team of scientists led by the University of Exeter is aiming to answer some of the biggest questions facing astronomy today.

Research reveals how butterflies copy their neighbours to fool birds

The mystery of how a butterfly has changed its wing patterns to mimic neighbouring species and avoid being eaten by birds has been solved by a team of scientists.

Roman civilisation travelled further than history books tell us

A University of Exeter archaeologist’s research has uncovered the largest Roman settlement ever found in Devon.

Exeter scientists grow plants with friendly fungi

The lack of rainfall and higher-than-average temperatures in spring 2011 were predicted to hit harvests, leading to higher food prices.

Expert in Arabic Studies honoured by British Academy

Professor Dionisius A Agius of the University of Exeter’s Institute of Arab and Islamic Studies has been elected as a Fellow of the British Academy.

Exeter academic contributes to new TV series on Islam

A University of Exeter academic, who is an expert on Islam, has contributed to the new television series ‘The Life of Muhammad’ currently being broadcast on BBC Two.

Study shows small-scale fisheries’ impact on marine life

Small-scale fisheries could pose a more serious threat to marine life than previously thought.

Exeter student inspired by Polar explorer ancestry

University of Exeter student Rebecca Rixon has shared the first findings of her research on the Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet.

History of Science in the South West

The submarine telegraph cable is one of the iconic technologies of the 19th century.

University of Exeter receives additional Grand Challenges Explorations funding

The University of Exeter announced today that it will receive additional funding through Grand Challenges Explorations, an initiative created by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

UK scientists tackle food security

The Universities of Exeter and Bristol, in partnership with Rothamsted Research are joining forces to tackle one of the biggest challenges facing humanity: how can we feed a growing population?

Decline in species shows climate change warnings not exaggerated

One in 10 species could face extinction by the year 2100 if current climate change impacts continue.

Businesses and University to build environmental knowledge economy for Cornwall

More than 100 business representatives have met with the University of Exeter to discuss how together they can build an environmental knowledge economy for Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly.

Invisibility cloak to be unveiled with new research

Becoming invisible with the swish of a cloak as in J K Rowling’s Harry Potter novels could soon be a reality with a £4.5 million research project.

Chocolate research shapes the future of gift shopping

Manufacturing and retail could get a boost from a newly-developed 3D chocolate printer.

Research reveals new secret weapon for Le Tour

Winning margins in the Tour de France can be tight – last year just 39 seconds separated the top two riders after more than 90 hours in the saddle.

Report reveals value of nature to UK economy

The University of Exeter has contributed to research that reveals that nature is worth billions of pounds to the UK economy.

South West shops support repair research

Shops from across the South West have helped a University of Exeter research team uncover the creativity and community spirit at the heart of the region’s small-scale repair industries.

Exeter study brings brain-like computing a step closer to reality

The development of ‘brain-like’ computers has taken a major step forward today with the publication of research led by the University of Exeter.

Exeter study reveals US turtles’ movements

A University of Exeter team has monitored the movements of an entire sub-population of marine turtles for the first time.

Student wins national prize for sea turtle study

A Cornwall Campus-based University of Exeter student has won a national prize for his research.

Climate change disasters could be predicted

Climate change disasters, such as the melting of the Greenland ice sheet, dieback of the Amazon rainforest or collapse of the Atlantic overturning circulation, could be predicted according to University of Exeter research.

‘Lost’ bats found breeding on Scilly

A University of Exeter biologist has discovered a ‘lost’ species of bat breeding on the Isles of Scilly.

Past environments and the sustainable future in Cornwall

Recent concerns about floods, drought, energy efficiency and sustainable land use have brought communities together to devise strategies to cope with environmental change.

New research discovers ‘unexpected’ innovation

New research by the University of Exeter Business School, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Knowledge Exchange Fellowship has uncovered some surprising new insights into innovation across the UK.

New research analyses role of border tax adjustments in climate change mitigation

A new study undertaken by researchers at the University of Exeter and the International Monetary Fund explores the interactions between climate change and international trade and, in particular, how they are best resolved.

Healthy planet, healthy people?

A major new research project will examine how policies designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions could impact human health, it has been announced today.

The novel in a time of climate change

The past five years have seen a significant increase in novels focusing on climate change. 

The future of manufacturing comes to Exeter

A £2.6 million facility at the University of Exeter is set to become a leading centre for a manufacturing technique which could revolutionise the way things are made.

Is big better in farming?

Are small family farms essential to the character of Britain? This was one of the questions posed at a recent meeting of the Family Farmers Association (FFA), held at Westminster.

World Premiere made possible via unique partnership

In a time of financial austerity, leading to reduced investment in the Arts, the University of Exeter has taken an innovative approach to the challenge of getting experimental playwriting commissioned and performed on stage.

Shaping the future of global energy policy

A leading academic at the University of Exeter has played a central role in compiling a report which could be vital for global efforts to tackle climate change.

Looking on the bright side

Farming has a viable future in the South West according to a recent survey of the farming community at the Devon County Show.

Plath in Devon

Devon seen through words, writing and literature forms part of a project called WordQuest Devon involving the development of a series of free public lectures on literary themes.

University receives generous support from Santander

The UK arm of Santander, the Spanish banking group, has generously pledged a further £315,000 in support for the University of Exeter, bringing its total funding for the organisation to close to half a million pounds.

Benefits of the natural environment investigated using virtual natural environments

The benefits of the natural environment can be investigated using virtual natural environments, sowing the seeds for the development of virtual solutions to some health problems.

Heritage at risk

Government spending cuts and rushed legislation within the cultural heritage sector are leading to a “devastating” loss of vital expertise, and to human activity that has the potential to “destroy” heritage irreparably, a new report by the British Academy has revealed. 

Africa’s sea turtles need passports for protection

Research by experts at the University of Exeter has led to calls to create an international marine park to protect sea turtles.

University pond reveals hidden history of fungi

Researchers at the University of Exeter have uncovered a ‘missing link’ in the fungal tree of life after analysing samples taken from the university’s pond.

Music conflict and transformation

The role of music in conflict and post conflict scenarios in places such as Sarajevo or Sierra Leone will be explored at a sociology conference on the 9th and 10th May. 

150 birthday celebrations for Indian poet and playwright

The 150th birthday of the renowned Indian poet, playwright, philosopher and artist Rabindranath Tagore is being marked through a programme of dance and theatre.

Honorary Fellowship recognises commitment to American Studies

A prestigious Honorary Fellowship has been awarded to University of Exeter Professor Helen Taylor for her sustained contribution to American Studies. 

Evolutionary biologist honoured with Royal Society award

An expert in evolutionary biology at the University of Exeter’s Cornwall Campus has been honoured with a prestigious award which recognises her outstanding research achievement and potential.

PhD student scoops prestigious European award

Einar Svansson, a University of Exeter Business School student, has won a prestigious European award for research he conducted about the Blue Lagoon in Iceland.

Crime and the rise of modern America

Nowhere celebrates its criminals like America. In books and on film, in fact and in fiction criminals sell.

Caterpillars aren’t so bird brained after all

Caterpillars that masquerade as twigs to avoid becoming a bird’s dinner are actually using clever behavioural strategies to outwit their predators, according to a new study.

Climate experts join international health conference

Climate and health experts from the Met Office and the University of Exeter will be heading to Africa for a conference to help fight life-threatening diseases across the continent.

Transformation of Europe's Armed Forces

The transformation of Europe’s armed forces is the subject of a new book by Professor Anthony King from the University of Exeter. 

Research shows not only the fittest survive

Darwin’s notion that only the fittest survive has been called into question by new research published in Nature.

A return to the Arctic for Exeter scientist

A scientist from the University of Exeter is preparing to brave sub-zero conditions as she returns to the Arctic to carry out research on how climate change is affecting the region.

Improving rugby for the next generation of grand slam winners

As the Six Nations comes to an end, a research project is under way to see how changing rugby’s rules at the junior level could help develop the next generation of grand slam winners.

Business School creates new network of international experts in tourism and well-being

The Business School Centre for Sport, Leisure and Tourism Research (CSLTR) recently held a two day event bringing together experts from around the world.

West Antarctic ice sheet ‘could be more stable than thought’

Whether global warming may cause the giant West Antarctic Ice Sheet to melt and raise sea-levels by several metres is one of the most contested debates in climate science.

Bible’s Buried Secrets

In a challenging three-part TV series on BBC 2 Dr Francesca Stavrakopoulou, Biblical Scholar and senior lecturer at the University of Exeter presents series of documentaries.

Research informs new government policy on hill farming

Funding of up to £26 million to support hill farmers and help some of England’s rural communities to thrive was unveiled by the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, The Rt Hon Caroline Spelman.

Brazil continues to celebrate after Carnival

The popular world view of Brazil may be triggered by thoughts of spectacular Carnivals and skilled footballers, yet the country is also determined to be regarded as a major global power.

‘Stupid strategies’ could be best for the genes

Blindly copying what your parents did – no matter how stupid it may seem – could be the best strategy for the long-term success of your genes, according to research by the Universities of Exeter and Bristol.

Exeter research helps explain mystery of ocean sediment

New research by an international team of researchers has revealed the previously unidentified role that fish play in the production of sediments in the world's oceans.

University's magnificent seven research experts

Seven University of Exeter professors have been chosen as expert panel members for the 2014 Research Excellence Framework.

£406,828 for research on performance archives

Researchers at the University of Bristol and the University of Exeter have been awarded a £406,828 grant from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) for research into live art and performance archives.

New funds for cultural history project

Southall is a large suburb of west London which has been a place of migration for diasporic communities, most particularly those of South Asian origin.

University of Exeter academic leads €1 million research project on food prices

Professor Steve McCorriston from the University of Exeter Business School will be leading a €1 million research project on factors determining food prices throughout the EU.

Ants ecosystem role is ‘key’

Research by the University of Exeter has revealed that ants have a big impact on their local environment as a result of their activity as ‘ecosystem engineers’ and predators.

Opposites may attract, but they aren’t better parents

A study by experts at the University of Exeter has revealed that couples with similar personalities make much better parents than those with different dispositions – at least in the world of zebra finches.

The public sector of the future

The University of Exeter is involved in one of the largest comparative public administration research project ever undertaken.

How has the Bible shaped the environment?

On Monday 24 January the presentation of a research project which will address questions, like how might the Bible be positively engaged in reshaping Christian theology and ethics concerning the environment, will be given at the at the Chapter House, Exeter Cathedral.

Exeter academic honoured for role in advancement of science

Professor John Dupré, the Director of Egenis at the University of Exeter has been elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). 

Researchers contribute to NICE revised decision on availability of Alzheimer’s drugs

A review of research evidence has played a pivotal role in the decision by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) to extend the availability of donepezil, galantamine, rivastigmine and memantine for Alzheimer’s disease.

More than 100 PhD funding awards for 2011 entry

The University of Exeter is offering more than 100 funding awards for PhD students to show its commitment to developing the next generation of researchers.

The sea, the sea

The University of Exeter is involved in the first major archaeological study focusing on the sea rather than a piece of land.

Epic journeys of turtles revealed

The epic ocean-spanning journeys of the gigantic leatherback turtle in the South Atlantic have been revealed for the first time thanks to groundbreaking research using satellite tracking.

Finding new ways to tackle environmental diseases

Researchers at the University of Exeter have developed a new approach to studying potentially deadly disease-causing bacteria which could help speed up the process of finding vaccines.

Cinema shows of Christmas past

Well before the invention of cinema, different types of moving and projected images were the height of sophistication for an evening’s entertainment.

Beetroot juice could help people live more active lives

New research into the health benefits of beetroot juice suggests it’s not only athletes who can benefit from its performance enhancing properties – its physiological effects could help the elderly or people with heart or lung-conditions enjoy more active lives.

A new perspective on Palestine in print

The boundaries between professional historiography, moral commitment and fiction have been re-examined in new publications on the troubled land of Israel and Palestine.

Intrepid researchers heading to Antarctica

Two researchers from the University of Exeter will be braving temperatures of -30C as they head to Antarctica to carry out important research on one of the world’s largest ice sheets.

University scheme ‘dramatically improved’ career prospects

University of Exeter graduate, Jason Williams, has recently landed a high-flying job with top service provider to the defence industry, Harmonic Limited.

High profile research to tackle plant disease

Researchers from the University of Exeter have played a key role in research which aims to tackle plant disease and contribute to future food security.

University forges stronger research links with Fera

The internationally recognised research expertise of the Biosciences department at the University of Exeter and the Food and Environment Research Agency (Fera) will now work in closer collaboration following a new agreement.

Exeter contributes to the history of the world

History experts from the University of Exeter have contributed their geographical and subject knowledge to the latest edition of the prestigious copy of The Times Complete History of the World.

New report highlights low carbon opportunities for Devon

A new report created by the University of Exeter for Devon County Council has highlighted a number of opportunities for the county as part of the examination of the Low Carbon Transition Plan (LCTP).

Exeter climate research highlights the ‘compost bomb’

The rate of global warming could lead to a rapid release of carbon from peatlands that would further accelerate global warming.

Partnership joins Exeter’s weather and climate experts

The world-class weather and climate expertise of the Met Office and the University of Exeter will enter a new era of collaboration with the launch today of an in-depth research partnership.

Muslims face higher level of threats outside the big cities

Muslims and their mosques face a higher level of threats and intimidation in UK suburbs and market towns than in big cities, according to a new report.

Global CO2 emissions back on the rise in 2010

Global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions – the main contributor to global warming – show no sign of abating and may reach record levels in 2010, according to a study led by the University of Exeter.

Local, national and international firms meet in France for high technology workshop

A distinguished selection of academics and leading industry figures met in Roscoff to discuss the next steps in the development of Marine Renewable Energy and Technology.

Study finds gender bias in diagnosing autism

Social factors can play a key role in whether or not a child is diagnosed as autistic, a new study has found.

Discovering the secrets of Stonehenge

A revolutionary new idea on the movement of big monument stones like those at Stonehenge has been put forward by an archaeology student at the University of Exeter.

Research reveals impact on endangered turtles

New research has revealed up to 16,000 endangered turtles are being caught each year by villagers in just one region of Madagascar, despite a government ban.

The art of presenting art

A striking new exhibition looking at the current trend for setting or presenting performance work in art galleries is now on show in the Drama department at the University of Exeter.

Concern over traumatic brain injury in youth offenders

A new study of young offenders has revealed they have a significantly higher rate of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) than that expected in society as a whole.

No easy solution to genetic ‘battle of the sexes’

A study involving researchers at the University of Exeter shows a genetic ‘battle of the sexes’ could be much harder to resolve and even more important to evolution than previously thought.

Stone Age humans needed more brain power for tool design

Stone Age humans were only able to develop relatively advanced tools after their brains evolved a greater capacity for complex thought, according to a new study investigating why it took early humans almost two million years to move from a razor-sharp stones to a hand-held stone axe.

New research on Highland witch

The witchcraft confessions of Isobel Gowdie in Scotland, 1662, are widely celebrated as the most extraordinary on record in Britain.

A future for farmed uplands

The distinctiveness and future of the South West’s farmed uplands is under discussion following recent research by the University of Exeter’s Centre for Rural Policy and Research.

Research proves ‘gender-bending’ chemicals affect reproduction

New research has provided the first evidence that ‘gender bending’ chemicals which find their way from human products into rivers and oceans can have a significant impact on the ability of fish to breed in UK Rivers.

Sex before the sexual revolution

What did sex mean for ordinary people before the sexual revolution of the 1960s and 70s? is a question that University of Exeter historian Dr Kate Fisher and Professor Simon Szreter from the University of Cambridge set out to answer in their new book.

Genetic test for early menopause

Researchers from the University of Exeter are working on a study which could lead to a test to predict a woman's reproductive lifespan.

Outstanding award for drama

A major American prize for books on theatre practice has been awarded to an Exeter drama academic.

Report highlights cost of Bovine TB to South West farmers

A new report highlighting the economic impact of Bovine Tuberculosis (TB) to the South West’s farming industry has been produced by experts at the University of Exeter.

Research suggests climate change target ‘not safe’

An analysis of geological records that preserve details of the last known period of global warming has revealed ‘startling’ results which suggest current targets for limiting climate change are unsafe.