Research News

Exeter researchers call for men to take part in fertility survey

New study to find out why increasing numbers of couples are suffering from fertility problems

Military historian shortlisted twice for major international awards

One of the world’s largest history prizes, has shortlisted ‘The Bombing War: Europe 1939-1945’ by University of Exeter historian, Professor Richard Overy. 

Bulgarian elections given a platform in Exeter thanks to student involvement

A University of Exeter student enabled citizens and students from Bulgaria living in the South West to vote in the recent Bulgarian General Elections by creating a voting station in Exeter. 

Researchers solve riddle of the rock pools - Study shows rock gobies use rapid colour change camouflage to hide from predators

Study shows rock gobies use rapid colour change camouflage to hide from predators.

Caribbean coral reef inhabitants critical in determining future of reefs

New research led by the University of Exeter has found that species that live in and erode coral reefs will play a major role in determining the future of reefs.

Genetic testing seeks co-ordinated approach in re-contacting patients

A new study will be examining the implications of when and how NHS healthcare professionals re-contact patients with new genetic information that may impact their health or that of their family.

Virtual worlds to be used to trial potential new water systems

Virtual worlds similar to those experienced by game-players of the global phenomena Minecraft and SimCity could be used to help test potential new water infrastructure development in the UK.

Older women more likely to have multiple health conditions

Call for urgent prioritisation of multimorbidity research to guide policy. 

Coastal living boosts physical activity - but only in the West

People who live close to the coast are more likely to meet physical activity guidelines than inland dwellers, finds a new study released today.

Air pollution increases river-flows

A study published in Nature Geoscience shows that air pollution has had a significant impact on the amount of water flowing through many rivers in the northern hemisphere.

Research paves way for new generation of fungicides

Research by the University of Exeter has provided novel insight into the mechanism by which pathogenic fungi avoid the immune responses of the plants they attack.

Major funding announced for bioscience students

The South West Doctoral Training Partnership (SWDTP) is to receive substantial new funding from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) for the training and development of bioscience PhD students.

University of Exeter’s commitment to gender equality in the sciences confirmed

The University of Exeter’s commitment to gender equality in science disciplines has been recognised through a prestigious national award scheme.

Study shows sharks have personalities

Some sharks are ‘gregarious’ and have strong social connections, whilst others are more solitary and prefer to remain inconspicuous.

Study identifies priority regions for conservation of iconic large marine animals

Oceanic fronts - areas where nutrients are drawn together resulting in foraging hotspots - should be priority regions for conservation efforts.

Genetic test for cancer patients could be cost-effective and prevent further cases

Screening for a genetic condition in younger people who are diagnosed with bowel cancer would be cost-effective for the NHS and prevent new cases in them and their relatives, new research has concluded.

Exeter archaeologist ensures thousands of Roman coins in Devon are recorded

A hoard of 22,000 Roman coins has been unearthed on land near Seaton in Devon.

Cervical cancer symptoms not recognised by young women

New research led by King’s College London and involving the University of Exeter Medical School suggests that many women under 30 with cervical cancer are diagnosed more than 3 months after first having symptoms.

Heritage of Earth’s water gives rise to hopes of life on other planets

A pioneering new study has shown that water found on Earth predates the formation of the sun – raising hopes that life could exist on exoplanets, the planets orbiting other stars in our galaxy.

Eureka moments between the sciences and the arts

Exeter academics have secured two of seven research awards to explore the cutting edge relationships between the sciences and the arts and humanities.

Simple blood test could be used as tool for early cancer diagnosis

High levels of calcium in blood, a condition known as hypercalcaemia, can be used by GPs as an early indication of certain types of cancer, according to a study by researchers from the University of Exeter Medical School and the University of Bristol.

Working together to promote greater resilience to flooding

Researchers from the University of Exeter are working to help communities become more resilient to natural hazards like flooding. 

Exeter bioscientist awarded Royal Society University Research Fellowship

A University of Exeter bioscientist is one of 43 UK scientists to be made a Royal Society University Research Fellow for 2014. 

CO2 emissions set to reach new 40 billion tonne record high in 2014

Remaining CO2 emission ‘quota’ may be used up in one generation and half of all fossil fuel reserves may need to be left untapped.

Times Good University Guide votes Exeter as top university in South West

Exeter has been named the top university in the Southwest according to The Times and The Sunday Times Good University Guide 2015 after reaching a new high of 7th place in the national rankings.

Lord of the Flies 60th anniversary marks handover of Golding archive to University

Lord of the Flies, the classic novel by William Golding, marks the 60th anniversary of its publication on 17 September.

Exeter professor bestowed with major international award

A leading professor from the University of Exeter has secured a significant international award, in recognition of his pioneering research.

Expedition finds Nemo can travel great distances to connect populations

New research shows that as babies clownfish sometimes travel hundreds of kilometres across the open ocean.

Genetics reveals patients susceptible to drug-induced pancreatitis

Doctors have discovered that patients with a particular genetic variation are four times more likely to develop pancreatitis if they are prescribed a widely used group of drugs.

 

New leaflet emphasises that "it's safe to talk about suicide" on World Suicide Prevention Day

A new public education leaflet, informed by University of Exeter Medical School research, has been launched to build confidence in talking to people about suicide, and could help save lives.

Devon children act up for healthy living

An innovative programme which brings actors into the classroom to encourage and support children to make healthier choices on diet and exercise has been selected to feature in this week’s British Science Festival.

Innovation in frontline healthcare strengthened by new collaboration

Excellence in frontline healthcare in the South West is being boosted by the launch of a new collaboration designed to put the region on the map.

New research highlights impacts of light pollution on marine life

Newly-published research highlights the variety of impacts light pollution has on the marine environment.

Carbon stored in the world’s soils more vulnerable to climate change than expected

The response of soil microbial communities to changes in temperature increases the potential for more carbon dioxide to be released from the world's soils as global temperatures rise.

Behind the scenes at 'the biggest fish tank you have ever seen'

An unusual large scale experiment being led by a group of scientists at the University of Exeter investigating how fish respond to underwater noise is the subject of a new NERC Planet Earth podcast.

Burnt out birds suggest hard work could be bad for your health

Unequal sharing of workloads in societies could leave the most industrious individuals at higher risk of poor health and prone to accelerated ageing, according to a new study of a cooperative bird in the Kalahari Desert.

New investment unites Exeter and Plymouth researchers to defeat dementia

Researchers in Exeter and Plymouth have been brought together in an exciting new venture to defeat dementia.

Why plants in the office make us more productive

‘Green’ offices with plants make staff happier and more productive than ‘lean’ designs stripped of greenery, new research shows.

Exeter academics elected to the Academia Europaea

Exeter academics in both the Arts and Sciences have been honoured with election to the prestigious Academia Europaea.

Protected areas proven to conserve biodiversity

Protected areas such as nature reserves and national parks do conserve biodiversity and more action is needed to ensure safeguards are in place to preserve them, according to a new international study.

Exeter Climate Scientist secures distinguished national science award

A world-leading climate scientist from the University of Exeter has been honoured with a prestigious national science award.

Invisible blood in urine may indicate bladder cancer

New research finds that invisible blood in urine may be an early warning sign of bladder cancer.

Indoor mould poses health risk to asthma sufferers

Damp and mould in homes could pose a significant health risk to people with asthma according to a new study published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

New study charts the global invasion of crop pests

Many of the world’s most important crop-producing countries will be fully saturated with pests by the middle of the century if current trends continue, according to a new study led by the University of Exeter.

It’s all a front – scientists unravel the mystery of gannets’ feeding success

Researchers at Plymouth Marine Laboratory and the University of Exeter have combined two innovative technologies to probe the mystery of how seabirds locate food hotspots across vast tracts of ocean.

Scientists urge public to take part in second wave of health survey

Scientists in Cornwall are making a second appeal for people to take part in research that will shed light on the health effects of marine pollution.

Self-deceived individuals deceive others better

Over confident people can fool others into believing they are more talented than they actually are, a study has found.

Research shows how buildings can better generate and retain energy

A PhD student has published new research into how improvements to Building Integrated Photovoltaic (BiPV) systems can mean more efficient, lower cost energy.

New study takes the shine off magpie folklore

Magpies are not attracted to shiny objects and don’t routinely steal small trinkets such as jewellery, according to a new study.

Epigenetic breakthrough bolsters understanding of Alzheimer’s disease

A team led by researchers at the University of Exeter Medical School and King’s College London has uncovered some of the strongest evidence yet that epigenetic changes in the brain play a role in Alzheimer’s disease.

Hidden Florence revealed through new history tour App

An opportunity to experience an unseen side of Florence is now possible via a new smartphone App which brings the past to life through the eyes of an ordinary 15th century Florentine.

Exeter psychologist gives expert evidence on head injury and re-offending link

A University of Exeter psychologist will today give evidence to the Justice Committee of the Scottish Parliament calling for recognition of the connection between head injury and re-offending.

New study reveals the effect of habitat fragmentation on the forest carbon cycle

Drier conditions at the edges of forest patches slow down the decay of dead wood and significantly alter the cycling of carbon and nutrients in woodland ecosystems, according to a new study.

Man-made noise makes fish more susceptible to predators

Despite their reputation as slippery customers, a new study has shown that eels are losing the fight to survive when faced with marine noise pollution such as that of passing ships.

Insights into predator vision revealed in ambitious field project

The question of how animals see, or what the world looks like through their eyes, has vexed and fascinated biologists for centuries. 

Penryn mathematicians help local magnet company attract international markets

A Falmouth company aims to beat off international competition by offering a more accurate method of characterising magnets for its global client base.

Research key weapon in government “war cabinet” to tackle antibiotic resistance

Research at the University of Exeter Medical School is part of an unprecedented cross council collaboration to tackle the rising threat of antibiotic resistance.

Link between vitamin D and dementia risk confirmed

Vitamin D deficiency is associated with a substantially increased risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease in older people, according to the most robust study of its kind ever conducted.

Primary care telephone triage does not save money or reduce practice workload

Demand for general practice appointments is rising rapidly, and in an attempt to deal with this, many practices have introduced systems of telephone triage. Patients are phoned by a doctor or nurse who either manages the problem on the phone, or agrees with the patient whether and how urgently they need to be seen.

Boat noise impacts development and survival of vital marine invertebrates

The development and survival of an important group of marine invertebrates known as sea hares is under threat from increasing boat noise in the world's oceans, according to a new study by researchers from the UK and France.

Bees able to spot which flowers offer best rewards before landing

Bumblebees are able to connect differences in pollen quality with floral features, like petal colour, and so land only on the flowers that offer the best rewards, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Exeter.

Major turtle nesting beaches protected in one of the UK's far flung overseas territories

Sea turtles are not a species one would normally associate with the United Kingdom. But on the remote UK overseas territory of Ascension Island, one of the world’s largest green turtle populations is undergoing something of a renaissance.

Problem drinking in midlife doubles chance of memory problems in later life

A study published today [Weds July 30] in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry indicates that middle-aged adults with a history of problem drinking are more than twice as likely to suffer from severe memory impairment in later life.

Noise pollution impacts fish species differently

Acoustic disturbance has different effects on different species of fish, according to a new study from the Universities of Exeter and Bristol which tested fish anti-predator behaviour.

£3.5 million for Exeter team’s national health technology assessment work

A team at the University of Exeter Medical School has been awarded £3.5 million to continue providing high-quality evidence to help the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) form key decisions on healthcare.

New device costing just £10 detects deadly lung disease

A scientist from the University of Exeter has developed a simple, cheap and highly accurate device for diagnosing a frequently fatal lung disease which attacks immune deficient individuals such as cancer patients and bone marrow transplant recipients.

Stress can make hard working mongooses less likely to help in the future

Researchers studying banded mongooses in Uganda have discovered that those who work hard to care for pups may be less likely to invest in future offspring in the same way due to elevated stress hormones.

Mapping legal crossroads of Empire summer exhibition

The Commonwealth Games is not the only one attracting a global audience, with the opening of an exhibition highlighting what was formerly the highest court of appeal for most colonies of the British Empire.

New report takes stock of jellyfish in UK seas

A new report by the University of Exeter and the Marine Conservation Society (MCS) takes stock of where and when UK jellyfish occur in UK seas for the first time in over 40 years.

Should we listen to our genes, or does mother know best?

Breaking the mould of inherited family characteristics could help you survive in a fast-changing world, scientists have discovered.

Age of puberty in girls influenced by which parent their genes are inherited from

The age at which girls reach sexual maturity is influenced by ‘imprinted’ genes, a small sub-set of genes whose activity differs depending on which parent passes on that gene, according to new research published today in the journal Nature

Cornish collaboration could revolutionise the market for electric vehicles

A new partnership between businesses and academics in Cornwall could revolutionise the way electric vehicles (EVs) are marketed in the UK.

Microplastics worse for crabs and other marine life than previously thought, study shows

The tiny plastic particles polluting our seas are not only orally ingested by marine creatures, but also enter their systems through their gills, according to a new study led by the University of Exeter.

Jerusalem Unbound: a City in Conflict

A new book, Jerusalem Unbound, plots the history and examines the underlying factors that make a peace agreement between Israel and the Palestinians so difficult.

Ipplepen Archaeological dig in the driving seat

A Roman road discovered on an archaeological dig has repairs to the road surface, showing that pot holes in Devon's roads are nothing new.

Exeter Science Park secures further links with the University of Exeter

The Exeter Science Park Company has strengthened its links with the University of Exeter through an agreement which will see the University’s innovation arm manage the new Science Park Centre.

Study reveals how gardens could help dementia care

A new study has revealed that gardens in care homes could provide promising therapeutic benefits for patients suffering from dementia.

Superheroes to the rescue, to religious education and beyond

A new initiative that uses superheroes to teach Religious Education at a school in Cornwall has won a national award.

Rediscovered World War One novel turned into play

A lost novel by a popular World War One soldier poet has been discovered in a garage and turned into a play which is soon to be performed at the Everyman Theatre, Cheltenham.

Feedback control could be key to robust conservation management

Mathematical algorithms used to control everyday household items such as washing machines could hold the key to winning the fight for conservation, a new study has claimed.

Researchers discover ‘Nano-pixels’ that promise thin, flexible high-res displays

A new discovery will make it possible to create pixels just a few hundred nanometres across that could pave the way for high-resolution low-energy flexible displays for applications such as ‘smart’ glasses, synthetic retinas, and foldable screens.

Science could help Cornwall lead the world in sustainable lobster fishing

Biologists from the University of Exeter’s Environment and Sustainability Institute at the Penryn Campus are assessing the impact of the National Lobster Hatchery’s activities on wild lobsters around Cornwall’s coast.

Rotten egg gas holds key to healthcare therapies

It may smell of flatulence and have a reputation for being highly toxic, but when used in the right tiny dosage, hydrogen sulfide is now being being found to offer potential health benefits in a range of issues, from diabetes to stroke, heart attacks and dementia.

Showcase highlighted innovation to improve healthcare and treatment

A wide range of research which is advancing knowledge on some of the greatest health challenges of our time was showcased at a dynamic event.

First scientific UAV facility in the UK launched in Cornwall

Cornwall is home to the UK’s first scientific facility dedicated to research involving Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), with a series of talks taking place on July 10-11 to mark the exciting launch.

‘Amazonian savannah’ supported ancient civilizations before rainforest took over

Large parts of the Amazon basin may have supported farming communities and looked more like open savannah than rainforest, prior to the arrival of Europeans in South America, scientists have found.

Business and bees could benefit from new research

Researchers from the University of Exeter’s Environment and Sustainability Institute (ESI) are collaborating with Cornwall’s leading vegetable growing company to increase its courgette yields by understanding more about how bees and other insects pollinate the plants.

Fal-moth study needs your garden

Falmouth residents are being sought by a student at the University of Exeter’s Penryn Campus who is conducting research into the causes of moth declines.

Regional weather extremes linked to atmospheric variations

Variations in high-altitude wind patterns expose particular parts of Europe, Asia and the US to different extreme weather conditions, a new study has shown.

Exeter scientist reveals secrets of Scotland’s basking sharks in new report

Seas between the islands of Skye and Mull on Scotland’s west coast are highly important for basking sharks, according to a report published today by Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH).

Exeter expert wins prestigious Physics award

A University of Exeter physics expert has been bestowed with a prestigious award, for his significant widening participation and outreach work.

Cornwall academic awarded medal for scientific contribution

Professor David Hosken from the Penryn Campus has been awarded a prestigious prize from the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) in recognition of outstanding scientific merit.

Exeter social scientists play leading role in major environmental assessment

Social scientists in Politics at the University of Exeter played leading roles in a major new assessment of UK environment resources

UK business incubator named number one in Europe

SETsquared has been ranked as the top university business incubator in Europe and second best in the world. 

WW1 soldier poet and composer Ivor Gurney shines bright at the BBC Proms

Archival research brings to light previously unheard, as well as rarely performed chamber, orchestral and choral works by World War One soldier, poet and composer Ivor Gurney.

Imagining the suburbs research event and book launch

The suburbs spread far and wide beyond city boundaries yet are rarely celebrated as places of cultural interest or excitement. 

Facial injuries and surgical advances exhibition

Soldiers in World War One with serious facial injuries are the catalyst for a research project and a new exhibition.

Exeter 6th in UK for most cited researchers says new global ranking

Eight University of Exeter academics feature in an authoritative new list of the most highly cited researchers, published this week by Thompson Reuters. This places Exeter 6th in the UK.

Arctic warming linked to fewer European and US cold weather extremes, new study shows

Climate change is unlikely to lead to more days of extreme cold, similar to those that gripped the USA in a deep freeze last winter, new research has shown.

Recreational football reduces high blood pressure in mature women

The World Cup in Brazil may be attracting a global armchair audience of millions, but new research has shown that playing football could help lower blood pressure in women aged 35-50.

Exeter academic wins most prestigious award for Higher Education teaching

A major education award that celebrates outstanding impact on the student learning experience and educational institutions has been awarded to a University of Exeter academic.

Scientists unravel the genetic secrets of nature’s master of mimicry

Scientists investigating how one of the greatest shape shifters in the natural world is able to trick predators to avoid being eaten have identified the gene behind the fascinating feat.

Earth’s breathable atmosphere a result of continents taking control of the carbon cycle, study suggests

Scientists investigating one of the greatest riddles of the Earth’s past may have discovered a mechanism to help determine how oxygen levels in the atmosphere expanded to allow life to evolve.

Mobile phones negatively affect male fertility, new study suggests

Men who keep a mobile phone in their trouser pocket could be inadvertently damaging their chances of becoming a father, according to a new study led by the University of Exeter.

New approach to writing changes policy and practice

A decade of research into the development of writing in school-aged children at the University of Exeter has shaped classroom practice in the teaching of writing and informed national and international policy. 

Building world-leading research communities

The first GW4 Alliance projects to receive funding to build research communities focused on tackling some of the world’s grand challenges, have been unveiled.

World Dementia Envoy opens Exeter health innovation hub

An award-winning centre which is cementing Exeter’s global reputation for health innovation has been officially opened by the World Dementia Envoy, Dennis Gillings, CBE, PhD.

Gone with the Wind 75th anniversary talk

The epic film Gone with the Wind marks its 75th anniversary this year. Scarlett O’Hara, the ultimate southern belle and heroine, forms the basis of a re-released book Scarlett’s Women: Gone with the Wind and its Female Fans which explores the film and why it appeals to a wide female fan base. 

Practical, affordable, management measures could accelerate the path to malaria eradication

The scourge of malaria could be curbed more rapidly in developing countries if governments and other partners adopted a series of measures to enhance program management, as outlined in a new paper by the University of California San Francisco, led by the University of Exeter’s Professor of Leadership, Jonathan Gosling. 

Gannet sat nav reveals impact of fishing vessels

Fishing vessels have a far bigger ecological footprint than previously thought, according to research which tracked the movement and behaviour of seabirds using GPS devices.

Student awarded prestigious Zonta International Amelia Earhart Fellowship

Mars spacecraft research lands Exeter student top international fellowship

Climate change and disasters discussed by Exeter academic at Hay Festival

The impact of weather-related disasters and how humans can prepare for climate change in the future will be discussed by a panel including Professor Katrina Brown of the University of Exeter’s Environment and Sustainability Institute (ESI) at the Hay Festival of Literature and the Arts this week.

BBC Radio 3 selects Exeter academics as new broadcasters

BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council’s (AHRC) nationwide search for academic broadcasters to turn ground-breaking ideas into fascinating programmes has been confirmed.

Exeter professor appointed to influential scientific advisory group

One of Exeter’s leading mathematicians has spoken of his “honour and delight” after being invited to join an influential science group, designed to develop, prioritise and fund strategic research.

Exeter scientists carry out pioneering analysis of four billion-year-old Mars meteorite

Scientists from the Camborne School of Mines have conducted a ground-breaking analysis of a Martian meteorite that dates back to the formation of the Earth.

Revolutionising Religious Education in schools

A new textbook has been written by University of Exeter academics which invites pupils to explore and interpret the meaning of biblical stories in a revolutionary new way.

Early warning system predicts dengue fever risk during the Brazil World Cup

University of Exeter scientists have helped develop an early-warning system to predict the risk of dengue fever outbreaks in Brazil during the forthcoming World Cup.

University of Exeter student crowned as ‘3 Minute Wonder’

A University of Exeter student has won a prestigious national competition designed to promote the pioneering work being carried out by early-career scientists to a wider audience.

Allotments yield healthier soil, study finds

The soils under Britain's allotments are significantly healthier than intensively farmed soils, researchers have found.

Scientists find best way to rid a garden of snails

Gardeners wanting to rid their spring flowerbeds of pesky snails can ditch the beer traps and egg shells and instead develop a strong throwing arm.

Exeter strengthens top ten position in The Complete University Guide

The University of Exeter is in the top ten of 123 UK universities for 2015 in the influential Complete University Guide, published yesterday.

Conference helps medics wake up to sleep disorders

Stephanie was an active single mum with a busy full-time job, when her life was unexpectedly derailed by a rare condition.

New £2 million partnership puts Exeter as research leader in Europe

The University of Exeter has announced a unique collaboration that will pioneer world-leading research to boost the effectiveness and safety of vital new drugs for both patients and the environment.

Exeter mathematician wins prestigious national science award

One of the University of Exeter’s foremost experts in climate dynamics has been honoured with a prestigious national science award.

Exeter evolutionary biologist receives European honour

Professor Nina Wedell has been elected to the membership of the European Molecular Biology Organisation (EMBO). 

All Party Parliamentary Group to study the benefits of bringing mindfulness into public policy

Ruby Wax will join experts and parliamentarians to launch an all party parliamentary group on mindfulness in the Houses of Parliament today.

Exeter to host first UK gathering of IPCC Fifth Assessment report authors

The world’s leading climate scientists will gather for an event to examine the future of climate change research following a major international report into the impacts, significances and implications of climate change.

Degraded coral reefs will threaten the livelihoods of fishermen

If coral reef health continues to decline, reefs of the future may not be able to support the food demands and livelihoods of millions of people living in the coastal tropics, according to new research from the Universities of Exeter and Queensland.

Exeter Biologist Elected Fellow of the Royal Society

Professor Nick Talbot of the College of Life and Environmental Sciences has been elected a Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), the premier scientific accolade in the United Kingdom.

How will climate change affect health in the UK?

A new research partnership to identify the effects of environmental change, including climate change, on health and wellbeing in the UK has been launched.

New funding to aid cancer bowel diagnosis in the young

The Department of Health has awarded funding for a new research project run by the University of Exeter and Bowel Cancer UK.

How Australia got the hump with one million feral camels

A new study by a University of Exeter researcher has shed light on how an estimated one million-strong population of wild camels thriving in Australia’s remote outback have become reviled as pests and culled on a large scale.

Research gives new insights into rare disease of the inner ear

A new study has shed light on the factors likely to lead to the development of a rare condition affecting the inner ear.

“Miracle treatment” families gather at Exeter centre of excellence

At five years old, Jack Neighbour’s neonatal diabetes health complications meant he had never spoken a word, and he communicated with his family through picture cards. Yet just six weeks after a genetic test by the team at the University of Exeter meant he could switch from insulin injections to tablets, he delighted his family by uttering his first words: the simple phrase “hello, mummy”.

Sexual conflict affects females more than males, says new research on beetles

Researchers at the University of Exeter have found that sexual conflict over mating impacts the parental care behaviour and reproductive productivity of burying beetles.

“Now is the time to act and establish a national service for diabetes prevention,” say academics

A major collaborative study into the prevention of diabetes by a team of academics from the University of Leicester and the University of Exeter has found that ‘half-hearted’ attempts to implement diabetes prevention guidance are much less effective than professionally developed, high-quality programmes.

Online Easter egg hunt helps scientists unlock secrets of camouflage

An online Easter egg hunt in which players act as ‘predators’ to find hidden bird eggs will help scientists better understand camouflage and its evolution.

Running geese give insight into low oxygen tolerance

A new study into how the world’s highest flying bird, the bar-headed goose, is able to survive at extreme altitudes may have future implications for low oxygen medical conditions in humans.

Flood prone communities in UK and Africa to share their stories through theatre

An ambitious project exploring the shared experiences of flood-hit and vulnerable communities in Cornwall and Kenya has been announced today, with the aim of building resilience for those affected by climate change and extreme weather events.

Surviving and thriving under climate change in the world’s deltas

Researchers from the University of Exeter are investigating the effect of climate change on deltas in South Asia and Africa to understand how people will respond and adapt.

Effect of important air pollutants may be absent from key precipitation observations

Pioneering new research from the University of Exeter could have a major impact on climate and environmental science by drastically transforming the perceived reliability of key observations of precipitation, which includes rain, sleet and snow.

Male extinction prevented by promiscuous females

Female fruit flies with a large number of sexual partners are playing an invaluable role in preventing the extinction of males, new research has shown.

Exeter plays significant role in new Centre for Doctoral Training

The University of Exeter will play a significant role in a new Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Centre for Doctoral Training in Sustainable Materials and Manufacturing.

Exeter plays part in crucial climate change task force

Academics from Geography at the University of Exeter have played an important role in The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)’s most recent report.

Blood test may help predict whether a child will become obese

Scientists have found that a simple blood test, which can read DNA, could be used to predict obesity levels in children.

Doctors raise blood pressure in patients

Doctors routinely record blood pressure levels that are significantly higher than levels recorded by nurses, the first thorough analysis of scientific data has revealed.

Pioneering research offers new insight into improved wave energy testing

Pioneering research could provide a significant boost in the vital quest to harness wave power as a viable renewable energy source for the future.

Awards success for ground-breaking diabetes researchers

Dr Richard Oram and Dr Angus Jones have won prestigious awards from the national charity Diabetes UK.

Cutting-edge health innovation centre will improve patient care

A newly-built £27.5 million health education and research centre is now open, streamlining the process from discovery to patient care.

Celebrating Research in Cornwall

A postgraduate research conference is being held at the University of Exeter’s Penryn Campus for the first time, demonstrating the breadth and impact of the work being carried out on emerging and important global issues in Cornwall.

New insight into the transport systems of cells

New insights into the basic operation of cells has been revealed in ground-breaking research carried out at the University of Exeter using a combination of advanced live-cell imaging, molecular genetics and quantitative analysis.

Global warming may increase methane emissions from freshwater ecosystems

New research led by the University of Exeter suggests that rising global temperatures will increase the quantity of the key greenhouse gas methane emitted from freshwater ecosystems to the Earth’s atmosphere – which could in turn lead to further warming. 

Politicians to be offered new service for tapping the latest academic research

A national consultation about a pioneering scheme to provide British politicians with unparalleled access to the very latest academic research has been launched.

First animals oxygenated the ocean, study suggests

The evolution of the first animals may have oxygenated the earth’s oceans – contrary to the traditional view that a rise in oxygen triggered their development.

Love or kill thy neighbour? New study into animal social behaviour

A theoretical study led by the University of Exeter has shed new light on the conditions that lead to the evolution of spite or altruism in structured populations.

Water racket - fish reactions to noise vary between species

Fish exposed to increased noise levels consume less food and show more stress-related behaviour, according to new research from the University of Bristol and the University of Exeter. 

Virtual bees help to unravel complex causes of colony decline

Scientists have created an ingenious computer model that simulates a honey bee colony over the course of several years.

New study combats depression in carers

Psychologists from the University of Exeter are trialling an innovative new type of support to help relatives and friends who care for stroke survivors – with studies showing that currently one in three become depressed or suffer other mental health problems.

Benefits of revolutionary energy Smart Grids could bypass consumers, new report warns

Hard-pressed consumers could miss out on benefits delivered by revolutionary energy smart grids unless they are clearly publicised and explained, a ground-breaking new study has said.

Study uncovers why almost winning is just as good for some gamblers

A new study led by the University of Exeter and Swansea University has pinpointed the changes in the brain that lead gamblers to react in the same way to near-misses as they do to winning.

Climate change won’t reduce deaths in winter

New research has found that climate change is unlikely to reduce the UK’s excess winter death rate as previously thought. The study is published in the journal Nature Climate Change and debunks the widely held view that warmer winters will cut the number of deaths normally seen at the coldest time of year.

Legal harvest of marine turtles tops 42,000 each year

A new study has found that 42 countries or territories around the world permit the harvest of marine turtles – and estimates that more than 42,000 turtles are caught each year by these fisheries.

Managed honeybees linked to new diseases in wild bees

Diseases that are common in managed honeybee colonies are now widespread in the UK’s wild bumblebees, according to research published in Nature.

Common medicines should mimic timing of body’s natural systems to prevent side-effects

Debilitating side effects associated with prescription medication for some of today’s most common conditions could be eradicated if they mimicked the body’s natural hormone secretion cycles, a new report has said.

‘Ground-breaking’ turtle study nets award for Tom

Unique research into endangered sea turtles, which will lead to a Caribbean government changing its conservation policy, has seen a student from the University of Exeter’s Penryn Campus recognised in a national competition.

Satellite tracking identifies Atlantic Ocean risk zones for leatherback turtles

The last large populations of the leatherback turtle are at risk because their migratory routes in the Atlantic Ocean overlap with the locations of industrial fisheries, a new study shows.

Hidden crop pest threat to poorer nations revealed

The abundance of crop pests in developing countries may be greatly underestimated, posing a significant threat to some of the world’s most important food producing nations, according to research led by the University of Exeter.

New book explores challenges for democracy in North Africa

The uncertainties surrounding the long-term prospect of democracy being fully embraced by North African nations embroiled in the Arab Spring rebellions are the focus of a fascinating new book. 

Peat bog restoration work holds back water

Restoration of peat bogs on Exmoor has resulted in a third less water leaving the moorland during heavy rainfall compared with three years ago, a new study involving the University of Exeter shows.

What the jackdaw saw - study shows birds communicate with their eyes

Researchers in Cambridge and Exeter have discovered that jackdaws use their eyes to communicate with each other – the first time this has been shown in non-primates.

Exeter climate change expert wins prestigious national science award

One of the University of Exeter’s foremost experts in climate change research has been honoured with a prestigious national science award.

£10 million boost for South West health research

A £10 million partnership in Devon, Cornwall and Somerset, which supports research with direct impact on patients' health and on improvements to the way in which NHS care is delivered, is to begin its next five year phase this month.

New app to monitor Ménière’s Disease launched

A new mobile app has been launched this week to help researchers develop a better understanding of a rare condition affecting the inner ear.

Astronomers research into exoplanets could hold key to riddle of Earth’s past

Pioneering research from University of Exeter scientists into the atmospheres of planets found beyond our own solar system could also help solve one of the greatest riddles of Earth’s past.

From Backbench to Lab Bench at the University of Exeter

Ben Bradshaw MP got a fascinating insight into science in his constituency when he visited the University of Exeter Medical School, as part of a unique ‘pairing’ scheme run by the Royal Society – the UK national academy of science.

Sensitivity of carbon cycle to tropical temperature variations has doubled, research shows

The tropical carbon cycle has become twice as sensitive to temperature variations over the past 50 years, new research has revealed.

Leading university researchers to deliver talks at local aquarium

Falmouth Aquarium, in collaboration with the University of Exeter, is hosting a series of public lectures from January which will see leading researchers discussing topical issues from climate change and food security to how we can reduce our own individual energy usage. 

Fungi are the rainforest 'diversity police'

A new study has revealed that fungi, often seen as pests, play a crucial role policing biodiversity in rainforests.

Schizophrenia in the limelight: film-industry technology provides insights into social exclusion

The first 30 seconds of a social encounter is crucial for people with symptoms of schizophrenia for establishing contact with people, according to new research carried out at Queen Mary University of London and the University of Exeter Medical School.

Glaciers existed in Britain as late as Georgian era

Research led by a scientist from the University of Exeter has shown that Britain was home to small glaciers within the last few centuries – around 11,000 years later than previously thought.

Researchers say polar bears are victims in public war of words

Polar bears and Inuit communities have become victims in the public war of words on climate change and wildlife conservation, according to researchers from Britain and Canada.

Global warming doubles risk of Extreme El Ninos, research shows

The risk of extreme versions of the El Niño weather phenomenon will double over the coming decades due to global warming, new research has shown.

Bat’s sea crossing is first from UK to mainland Europe

A tiny bat found in the Netherlands is believed to provide the first direct evidence that British bats migrate over the sea between the UK and mainland Europe.

Exeter scientist named in top 100

A psychologist who specialises in behaviour change has been named among the top 100 leading practising UK scientists, as drawn up by the Science Council.

Enormous scale of Nile 'mega lake' revealed

The eastern Sahara Desert was once home to a 45,000 km2 freshwater lake similar in surface area to the largest in the world today.

Legacy gift of £280,000 will help advance dementia research

Dementia research at the University of Exeter Medical School has received a boost in the form of a legacy gift of £279,933 from the late Michael Harnell.

Diabetes blood glucose targets are risk free, research shows

Diabetes research led by the University of Exeter Medical School has underlined the importance of people with diabetes achieving their blood sugar goals, to reduce the risk of complications.

Antarctic’s Pine Island Glacier in ‘irreversible retreat’

An international team of scientists has shown that Pine Island Glacier, the largest single contributor to sea-level rise in Antarctica, has entered a period of irreversible, self-sustained retreat and is likely to increase its discharge into the ocean in comparison to the last decade.

Cambodian villagers best placed to prevent illegal logging

A study into deforestation in Cambodia has found that forests are better protected when villagers are given the responsibility to manage them locally.

NHS cancer risk threshold ‘too high’ for patients, research indicates

Patients have expressed an appetite for potential cancer symptoms to be checked out much sooner than current NHS thresholds guidelines suggest, new research has revealed.

Artificially cooling planet would cause climate chaos, new research shows

Plans to reverse the effects of global warming by mimicking big volcanic eruptions would have a catastrophic impact on some of the most fragile ecosystems on earth, new research has shown.

Green spaces deliver lasting mental health benefits

Green space in towns and cities could lead to significant and sustained improvements in mental health, finds a new study published in the journal of Environmental Science & Technology.

University of Exeter joins BBC Stargazing Live event

Budding astronomers will be given a unique opportunity to witness the remarkable atmospheric properties of exoplanets when the BBC's hugely popular programme Stargazing Live returns for a new series this week.

Scientists discover new causes of diabetes

Research by the University of Exeter Medical School has revealed two new genetic causes of neonatal diabetes.

Research into fruit fly cells could lead to cancer insights

New research by scientists at the University of Exeter has shown that cells demonstrate remarkable flexibility and versatility when it comes to how they divide – a finding with potential links to the underlying causes of many cancers.