Mentoring Training

Mentors should book on and attend the earliest possible University Mentoring skills training.  

At the start of a mentoring partnership (as part of your first meeting), it is essential to discuss mutual expectations and establish a set of ground rules as to how the relationship will be conducted. This will ensure that the relationship develops effectively and your needs are met.  Find more resources in the accordian below. 

Resources

Additional Resources for Academic Staff

  • Watch Vitae’s ‘Will getting a mentor boost your career’ hangout video.
  • Vitae has developed a range of new resources to support those who manage and mentor researchers as part of their role. If you have responsibility for supporting research staff or students in their professional and career development we think you will find something to interest you.
  • Guidance for Research Directors and PIs to support successful career conversations with members of research staff.

Addtional Reading

  • Unconscious bias 
  • Heron's 6 categories of intervention
  • Plous, S. (1993) The Psychology of Judgement and Decision-Making. London: McGraw-Hill.
  • Berne, Eric. (1964). The games people play. Penguin.
  • Transactional Analysis
  • An example of foundation NLP: Molden, D. (1996). Managing with the power of NLP. London: Pitman.
  • Navarro, J. (2008) What every body is saying. Harper Collins.
  • Brown, D. (2007). Tricks of the mind. Channel 4 books.
  • Golman, D. (1995) Emotional intelligence. New York: Bantam books.
  • Howard-Jones, P. & McGurk, J. (2014). Fresh thinking in learning and development Part 1 of 3: Neuroscience and learning. CIPD: Research Report. London.
  • Watkins and Mhor (2001), Appreciative Inquiry: Change at the Speed of Imagination. Jossey-Bass, Pfieffer.
  • Richardson, L & St Pierre, E. (2005). Writing: A method of inquiry In N. Denzin & Y. Lincoln (Eds.), Handbook of Qualitative Research (3rd ed., pp. 959-978). London: Sage
  • Megginson, D. and Clutterbuck, D. (2014). Techniques for coaching and mentoring. London: Routledge.
  • Alred, G. Garvey, B. and Smith, R (1998). The Mentoring Pocketbook. Management Pocketbooks.
  • Allen, J. (2004). Revealing the power of mentoring. The Centre for mentoring. (I think this is out of print but Amazon has copies for sale still).

 

 

 

Admisitrator training

Online video library for help administering schemes with SUMAC.

Recommended viewing:

Being an effective mentor checklist

  • Set aside enough time for each mentoring session;
  • Help mentees to express and discuss ideas and any concerns affecting their experience in the workplace;
  • Give mentees information and advice that will help them to be effective in the workplace;
  • Give mentees opportunities which help them understand and adapt to the working environment;
  • Identify ways of developing mentees’ confidence in performing activities in the workplace;
  • Help mentees take increasing responsibility for developing their skills in the workplace;
  • Help mentees look at issues from an unbiased point of view that helps them make informed choices;
  • Give mentees honest and constructive feedback;
  • Identify when the mentoring relationship needs to change to still be effective, and agree any changes with the mentee;
  • Identify when the mentoring relationship has reached its natural end and review the process with the mentee;
  • Agree what, if any, extra support and help the mentee needs or can access;
  • Plan how any extra support and help can be provided.

Being an effective mentee checklist – use prior to the first meeting

  • Contact your perspective mentor(s) explaining your mentoring needs using the mentoring pro forma;
  • If a positive answer is received, exchange phone numbers, email information, office hours;
  • Update and send CV or other relevant documents to your mentor prior to each meeting (if felt relevant to enhance your discussions);
  • Review your mentee application form checklist and prepare to discuss the topics listed;
  • Prepare questions and other topics to address with mentor;
  • Schedule a time for the first meeting with the mentor

Both parties take equal responsibility for the progression of the mentoring: the key task for a mentor is to support the mentee in identifying and clarifying their development needs while the mentee’s role is to seek to address them. Open communication is the key to any good relationship. Throughout the mentoring relationship you should be speaking with your mentor about whether or not you are fulfilling the joint goals set out at the beginning of your partnership and clarify expectations. You will be asked to provide feedback on your progress and experience throughout the mentoring relationship.

Who do I contact if I have any concerns or problems regarding my mentor/mentee?

Throughout the mentoring process, you should be speaking with your mentor about your shared progress in fulfilling the goals set at the beginning of the relationship. It is natural, however, that not all relationships will be perfect. If you are in a situation where you would like guidance or are experiencing conflict, please contact the Mentor Scheme Aministrator or your HR Advisor who will be able to refer you to the appropriate person.

If the mentor has any concerns over duty of care issues arising during the course of the mentoring relationship, the mentee should be signposted to the appropriate team or service. The ‘Further support and signposting’ section contains a suggested list of contacts and services to which you can refer (i.e. occupational health, dignity & respect team etc). Mentors or mentees can also contact the Mentoring Scheme Administrator for further guidance on the sources of support available.

How will I know if I’m doing a good job?

Both parties take equal responsibility for the progression of the mentoring: the key task for a mentor is to support the mentee in identifying and clarifying their development needs while the mentee’s role is to seek to address them.

Open communication is the key to any good relationship. Throughout the mentoring relationship you should be speaking with your mentee about whether or not you are fulfilling the joint goals set out at the beginning of your partnership and clarify expectations based on your role as a mentor. Your mentor will also ask you to provide feedback on your progress and experience throughout the mentoring relationship. If you are helping your mentee make progress on their job search, then your relationship is successful.

Although One Step Beyond is primarily a scheme focused on enhancing staff development, as a mentoring relationship progresses it may become apparent that engaging with other sources of support would be beneficial. Below is a list of resources and services available to support staff wellbeing in addition to their mentoring relationship.

Wellbeing

  • The University of Exeter has a wealth of internal resources aimed at supporting staff wellbeing, which mentors can signpost to, or engage with themselves.
  • Care First: provides Telephone, Online, and Counselling and Support service provides free impartial advice and support to staff and students 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.
  • Staff Wellbeing Resources
  • Dealing with stress
  • Wellbeing self-assessment tool
  • Complementary therapies
  • Staff Life Open Groups
  • Wellbeing maps
  • Flexible Working Toolkit
  • Staff Counselling Service
  • Occupational Health
  • Flexible working for Education & Scholarship and Education & Research employees

Protecting Staff Dignity and Respect

  • Staff Dignity, Respect and Wellbeing
  • Harassment and/or bullying
  • Dignity and Respect Advisors
  • Care First Employee Assistance Service
  • Human Resources Business Partner/Manager/Advisor
  • Trade Union representatives
  • Athena SWAN

Supporting Parents and Carers

Key internal resources available to staff who are, or are about to become, parents and/or carers:

  • Key information for parents and carers
  • Parents and Carers Network/Budd-E system
  • Career re-start funding
  • Flexible Working Toolkit
  • Flexible working for Education and Scholarship and Education and Research Employees
  • Teaching time restriction applications
  • Human Resources Business Partner/Manager/Advisor

How often should I meet with my mentor/mentee?

The mentor and mentee respect each other’s time and other responsibilities, ensuring that they do not impose beyond what is reasonable. The frequency and length of meetings should be mutually agreed, along with the level and means of contact between meetings, at the start of the Mentoring relationship.

Do I meet with my mentor/mentee in person?

It is recommended that you meet in person, especially for the first few meetings. However, there will be times when on-line/phone communication or video conferencing will be more convenient and/or effective for both of you, particularly if you are based on different campuses. Please contact onestepbeyond@exeter.ac.uk to find out more about our cross-campus One Step Beyond travel fund.

Where should I have meetings with my mentor/mentee?

Meeting locations are determined jointly by the mentor and mentee. The mentoring relationship should be conducted in a safe, non-judgemental environment that facilitates a wide range of learning, experimentation and development. Meetings may take place at the mentor’s office, a coffee shop or another mutually agreeable place.

If asked by the mentee, should the mentor provide a professional or personal reference?

This should be agreed at the start. Generally speaking the answer is 'no'. Mentoring is about helping someone help themselves and not about making judgements about their aptitudes, ability and potential.

Some people confuse the mentee relationship with patronage and approach the mentor for a reference. The problems with this are that:

  • The mentee may then say things to the mentor with the aim of impressing them and not therefore engage fully in an open exploration of uncertainties and weaknesses. They would not then make best use of the confidential mentoring relationship.
  • The mentee may have unrealistic ideas about how the Mentor could use his/her professional networks. We would like the confidentiality to be in both directions.

Applying mid- scheme

There is a planned cycle for mentoring schemes to ensure the best possible matches for all individuals involved in the scheme. If you apply late for the scheme we will still attempt to match you but the probability of finding as good a match as you could have achieved is lower. In some circumstances we may have to wait for the next cycle to find you an appropriate match. If in the mean time you identify an appropriate match for yourself, we are able to help and support you and your mentor with the process, just email us: staffmentoring@exeter.ac.uk