Sociology (including Criminology)

About Sociology

Sociology is a fascinating subject providing a critical understanding of all aspects of society and social life. Few other disciplines offer so much variety. Sociologists are interested in a huge range of social activities including intimate personal relationships, family life, crowds, religious groups, political parties, businesses and state bureaucracies. Our programmes have been designed to help you develop an understanding of how societies, institutions and practices of all kinds came into being, how they work now and how they might change.

Student experience

If you study Sociology at Exeter you’ll enjoy a student-friendly environment which encourages personal and professional development as well as academic performance. You’ll be expected to develop good organisational and time management skills and we’ll help you acquire further employability skills (such as proficiencies in data analysis, communication, research, presentation and IT) and work experience. Sociology is taught and studied in the department of Sociology, Philosophy and Anthropology. The department is a small, ambitious and highly successful unit and you’ll benefit from a friendly atmosphere and exposure to the latest inspirational advances in social science research. Sociology can be studied either as Single Honours, or in combination with several other arts and social science subjects, including philosophy, anthropology and criminology.

Approach to teaching

Our academic staff have a wide range of research interests in sociology, anthropology, criminology and philosophy. Our research was ranked 9th in the UK in the latest Research Excellence Framework (2014), and is particularly noted for the contributions it makes to the sociology and anthropology of culture (science and technology, religion, the arts, sport and the military) and the sociology of knowledge and social theory. This research excellence is of direct benefit to you, as your teachers will be contributing to current debates and integrating this within their teaching. Our undergraduates have established a popular Sociology Society which meets several times a year and organises a seminar series with members of staff to provide an arena outside the formal teaching structure in which staff and students can discuss sociological issues.