Frequently asked questions

Below are some quick links to the answers of some of our most frequently asked questions. If you can't find the answer your looking for then please get in touch by logging an enquiry in SID online or by calling us on 01392 72 4381.

Wellbeing

The University of Exeter Wellbeing Services team, made up of counsellors, therapists and mental health practitioners are all highly skilled and experienced. We are able to offer advice, therapeutic and practical support to help you cope personally and to manage your studies.

AccessAbility

AccessAbility offers advice and assistance to students with disabilities and health conditions, providing you with every opportunity to succeed and progress to graduation. Staff have expertise in, and experience of, supporting students with additional needs, including specific learning difficulties, physical disabilities and unseen disabilities such as epilepsy.

There are a number of ways you can book an appointment.  You can either:

1.Login to SID online - select 'Book an Appointment' hover over ‘Bookable Appointments’ and choose 'Wellbeing Telephone Referral Appointment'. (An email will then be sent to you confirming your appointment). Please ensure the telephone details we have for you are updated on your Student Record Tab on MyExeter. A clinician will ring you at the appointment time you have selected.


2. Telephone Wellbeing Services Reception on (01392) 724381. Our receptionists will be pleased to hear from you and will be able to offer you an appointment over the phone.

3. Drop in to the Wellbeing Centre where our receptionists will be happy to offer you an appointment.

All students must have a telephone referral appointment with a practitioner before accessing any of the services or therapies available within Wellbeing. In the telephone appointment, you will have the chance to have a brief chat to the practitioner about any concerns or issues you may have. You may then be referred for an initial assessment if it is decided that you would benefit from ongoing support from one of our pathways. 

All the help and support we offer is confidential.  This means that we do not disclose verbal or written information about you to others (including your College or your doctor) without your consent.

There are however, rare occasions when the rule of confidentiality might be waived. These will be discussed with you at assessment. For full details of these exceptions, please see our Wellbeing Confidentiality Statement.

The first thing to do is to make an urgent appointment with your GP/doctor.  

The GPs at the Student Health Centre on Streatham Campus can see all students regardless of where they are registered.

We also recommend you check the resources list on our website for further advice.

If you are applying for mitigation you will need to contact your College or Student Office who will offer you advice and support with regard to the application procudeure. Please also see the University’s guidelines on mitigation

 

Yes, they are all free to all Exeter University students.

For more information, please see the Wellbeing Services website or Log an Enquiry on-line with the Student Information Desk (via the Help and Support tab on MyExeter).

Cornwall Campus
Please contact Student Health and Welfare on 01326 370460.

Some students attend only one session and find that this is enough.  Others may need several sessions or return at different points throughout their academic careers.  Every person's situation is unique and your practitioner will discuss what we can offer you given your personal circumstances and the resources available to us.

For more information, please see the Wellbeing Services website or Log an Enquiry on-line with the Student Information Desk (via the Help and Support tab on MyExeter).

Cornwall Campus
Please contact Student Health and Welfare on 01326 370460.

The team is committed to maintaining high standards and subscribe to the relevant professional bodies and authorities, such as the British Association for Counselling (BACP) and Psychotherapy's Ethical Framework for Good Practice.

All practitioners are required to undertake Clinical Supervision with a senior therapist in their field.  Supervisors are external to the University and also work within appropriate professional guidelines.

 

The Wellbeing Service offers placements each year to a few newly qualified and trainee counsellors who are gaining additional clinical experience working as part of a team in Higher Education.  They are supervised regularly by senior members of staff who have trained as clinical supervisors.  You will be asked at your assessment if you are happy to see a practitioner on placement.

Counselling offers the opportunity to explore personal issues in a private setting with a professionally qualified practitioner who remains quite separate from everyone else in your life and outside of your day-to-day activities at university.  


For more information, please see the Wellbeing Services website or Log an Enquiry on-line with the Student Information Desk (via the Help and Support tab on MyExeter).

Counselling offers you a safe and confidential space to talk about anything that may be troubling you.  


Sometimes there is no specific problem but you may simply want to talk about feeling unhappy or confused.  The Wellbeing Services Team are happy to hear about anything that may be troubling you.

For more information please see the Wellbeing Services website or Log an Enquiry on-line with the Student Information Desk (via the Help and Support tab on MyExeter).

CBT is a structured approach that focuses on your goals and aims to help you manage your problems by changing the way you think and behave. It tends to initially focus on your current problems, and then if needed your past, to help you to develop practical solutions to manage your life.

The University offers professional mental health support to all students through the Wellbeing Services Team at the Wellbeing Centre on Streatham Campus and the Accessibility Service at the Cornwall Campus.  

Both teams offer a confidential and supportive place to discuss what is happening for you and how your mental health difficulties are impacting on your course, academic progression and university life.

Support can include assistance in managing your mental health difficulties, putting in place reasonable adjustments to your course, liaising with your academic College and/or signposting to other services such as your GP, International Student Support and Community Mental Health Services.

If you are struggling with your course as a result of your mental health difficulty it is important to talk to someone as soon as possible. 

There are several people you could speak to including:

  •  A member of staff from Wellbeing Services or (if you are in Cornwall) an Accessibility Advisor
  •  Your GP/doctor
  •  Your personal tutor
  • A member of staff from your College or Student Office

 

For more information, please see our leaflet on "Support for Students Experiencing Mental Health Difficulties".

 

If you think that your friend may have a mental health difficulty, if possible try to encourage them to make an appointment with either their GP/doctor, or the Wellbeing Services team at the Exeter Campus, or a Mental Health Advisor at the Cornwall Campus.

 

The University offers a lot of support for students who experience mental health difficulties. As a start, you could show your friend the following online information which may help them to access support:

The Health, Wellbeing and Fitness to Study procedure ensures you are properly supported with any health and wellbeing issue that is impacting on your ability to study.  

The full procedure can be found here:                           

A Health, Wellbeing and Fitness to Study meeting provides an opportunity to consider how you are managing at university and what adjustments and support options may be helpful to you.

 

 

Mental health mentoring is a form of study and personal support which helps students with mental health issues to fully access their course.  

The Mental Health Mentors are experienced mental health professionals who work as part of the Wellbeing Services Team based at the Reed Mews Wellbeing Centre on the Exeter Campus. 

A Mental Health Mentor would work with you to identify how your mental health is impacting on your daily life including your ability to access your course. 

They will also work with you to develop strategies to help you manage your health and wellbeing more effectively.

The Equality Act (2010) requires that reasonable adjustments are put in place to remove barriers that may prevent students from participating at university and to minimise the impact that their mental health difficulty may have on their ability to study. 

A reasonable adjustment is a response to an individual student’s needs and is any slight alternative to the existing framework, elements and assessments of the student’s course.  Examples of reasonable adjustments include:

Putting an individual learning plan in place (ILP)

  • Exam arrangements
  • Special field trip arrangements
  • Renegotiated deadlines
  • Alternative assessments

For more information, please see our leaflet on "Support for Students Experiencing Mental Health Difficulties". or book a mental health appointment with Wellbeing Services.

You do not have to declare your mental health difficulty to the University. However, by not declaring it you may limit the support that is available to you. 

Many students can be concerned about declaring a mental health difficulty and worry this may be seen negatively or that they may be labelled in an unhelpful way. However, there is legislation to protect you from this sort of discrimination.

When a student declares that they have a mental health difficulty, the University has a responsibility to provide the best support and advice to the student.

The Disabled Student's Allowance (DSA) can provide specialist equipment and staff support, depending on individual need, to minimise the impact that a student's mental  health difficulty may have on their ability to study at university.

Students who experience mental health difficulties may be eligible to apply for the DSA and would need to get medical evidence from a doctor to apply.  

For more information, please see the DSA Website or book an appointment with Wellbeing Services.

It is a statement of reasonable adjustments required by law to support an individual student, tailored to their needs. In order for a student to have an ILP in place, the student will have a health issue or disability which fits the criteria to be classified as a disability under the Equality Act 2010.

Reasonable adjustments are put in place in order to remove barriers that may prevent students from participating at university, and to minimise the impact that their health condition or disability may have on their ability to study.