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LEEPout seminar series

The LEEP Institute’s webinar programme of international excellence in environmental and resource economics

Overview

The Exeter LEEPout webinar series is a monthly seminar series hosted by The Land, Environment, Economics, and Policy Institute at the University of Exeter. Following the success of the LEEPin2019 conference, and given the current environment, the LEEPout series is designed as a platform for the very best researchers to showcase their work at the cutting edge of environmental and resource economics.

When

Webinars will occur once a month (usually the third Wednesday or Thursday) at 4pm UK time

How to participate

Upcoming talks are detailed below. To join the webinar you must register in advance of each talk. Registration is organised through Eventbrite, and there are links below the description of each talk to the specific Eventbrite page.

Want to hear about upcoming talks?

Eventbrite registration and details of upcoming talks will first be announced through our mailing list and you are able to subscribe to our mailing list via MailChimp.

You can also register your interest via email to LEEP@exeter.ac.uk

Previous sessions

Where it is possible we aim to record each webinar, please find links to previous recordings on our YouTube site 

 

‌‌Kelsey Jack

Kelsey Jack - Harvesting the rain: The adoption of environmental technologies in the Sahel -  confirmed date 3rd December 2020 - Time: 16:00-17:00 GMT (17:00 - 18:00 Central Europe; 11:00-12:00 Eastern; 08:00-09:00 Pacific) ‌ more details to follow soon 

Kelsey Jack is an Assistant Professor in the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at UC Santa Barbara. Her research is at the intersection of environmental and development economics, with a focus on how individuals, households, and communities decide to use natural resources and provide public goods. Kelsey’s research uses field experiments to test theory and new policy innovations. It has appeared in many of the top economic and scientific journals, including: The American Economic Review, American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Proceeding of the National Academy of Sciences, and Review of Economics and Statistics.  Please register for this free online event via Eventbrite

 

 

‌‌Kelsey Jack

Kelsey JackHarvesting the rain: The adoption of environmental technologies in the Sahel -  confirmed date 3rd December 2020 - Time: 16:00-17:00 GMT (17:00 - 18:00 Central Europe; 11:00-12:00 Eastern; 08:00-09:00 Pacific) ‌ more details to follow soon 

Kelsey Jack is an Assistant Professor in the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at UC Santa Barbara. Her research is at the intersection of environmental and development economics, with a focus on how individuals, households, and communities decide to use natural resources and provide public goods. Kelsey’s research uses field experiments to test theory and new policy innovations. It has appeared in many of the top economic and scientific journals, including: The American Economic Review, American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Proceeding of the National Academy of Sciences, and Review of Economics and Statistics.  Please register for this free online event via Eventbrite

Jayson Lusk

Jayson Luskconfirmed date 21st January 2021 - Time: 16:00-17:00 GMT (17:00 - 18:00 Central Europe; 11:00-12:00 Eastern; 08:00-09:00 Pacific) more details to follow soon

Prof. Jayson Lusk currently serves as Distinguished Professor and Head of the Agricultural Economics Department at Purdue University. He’s a food and agricultural economist who studies what we eat and why we eat it. Since 2000, he has published more than 240 articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals on a wide assortment of topics ranging from the economics of animal welfare to consumer preferences for genetically modified food to the impacts of new technologies and policies on livestock and meat markets to analyzing the merits of new survey and experimental approaches eliciting consumer preferences. In 2011, Prof. Lusk served as a visiting researcher at the French National Institute for Agricultural Research and worked on a research fellowship awarded by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development. He’s served on the editorial councils of eight academic journals including the American Journal of Agricultural Economics, the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, and Food Policy and consulted for various non-profits, government agencies, and agribusinesses.  He has also been elected to and served on the executive committees of the three largest U.S. agricultural economics associations. He is a fellow and past president of the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.  Please register for this free online event via Eventbrite

 

Antonio Bento - confirmed date 18th February 2021 - Time: 16:00-17:00 GMT (17:00 - 18:00 Central Europe; 11:00-12:00 Eastern; 08:00-09:00 Pacific) more details to follow soon

Antonio Bento is currently a Professor at the Sol Price School of Public Policy and the Department of Economics at the University of Southern California. Antonio is an applied microeconomist with a research program in the areas of environmental, energy, urban, and public economics. Most of his work consists of theoretical and empirical assessments of major public policy issues, and his scholarly interests range widely both in topics and methods, but with a recent focus on policies related to energy provision and consumption. His work has been published in the American Economic Review, the American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, the Review of Economics and Statistics, the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, the Journal of Urban Economics, the Energy Journal and other scholarly journals and books.  Please register for this free online event via Eventbrite

Dates to be confirmed:

 

 

Corbett Grainger  - “The Impact of Air Pollution on Labor Supply in China” (with M. Fa.n) (link to presentation)

Corbett is an Associate Professor in the Ag & Applied Economics Department at University of Wisconsin. His research focuses on understanding the distributional effects of regulations, property rights and institutions as well as the political economy of environmental and natural resource policy. Applications include ambient air pollution, climate change and rights-based management of marine fisheries. His research has appeared in many of the top economics journals, including AEA Papers & Proceedings, Journal of Public Economics, Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, and Journal of Environmental Economics and Management. 

Thomas Sterner - Thomas is a Professor at the University of Gothenburg where he has built a large Environmental Economics Unit (link to presentation)

Thomas is a former president of the European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists (2008-9), and was employed 2012-3, as the Chief Economist at the Environmental Defence Fund. Thomas was also a Coordinating Lead Author for the IPCC AR5 2010-2015 and sits on the council which will evaluate the 10bn€ French Green Bond program – the world’s largest such scheme. His academic publications have appeared in top journals including Nature, Science, and Journal of Environmental Economics and Management

Vic Adamowicz - Chronic Wasting Disease: Economic Analysis of a Complex Wildlife Disease (link to presentation)

Vic is a Professor in Environmental Economics and Vice Dean at the Faculty of Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences at the University of Alberta (Canada). His research focuses on integrating the environment into economic analysis, environmental valuation, consumer choice, and market based instruments for environmental conservation. Vic has published more than 150 refereed journal articles. His work, which has been cited more than 20,000 times, has been published in several top economic and science journals, including Proceeding of the National Academy of Sciences, American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, and Journal of Environmental Economics and Management. During his career, Vic has also served as President of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economics.

This presentation was based on research conducted by a team of social scientists centered at the University of Alberta including Ellen Goddard, Marty Luckert, Brenda Parlee, Lusi Xie, John Pattison-Williams, Geoff Durocher, Merlin Uwalaka,  as well as colleagues Maik Kecinski (U Delaware), Pat Lloyd-Smith (U Sasakatchewan) and Margo Pybus and Anne Hubbs (Alberta Environment and Parks). This research has been supported by the Alberta Prion Research Institute, the Canadian Agri-Food Policy Institute, Genome Alberta and Genome Canada.

Ben Groom - Title:  REDD+ as an area based policy: Evidence from the 2011 Indonesian Moratorium on Palm Oil, Logging and Timber Concessions - Lorenzo Sileci, Charles Palmer and Ben Groom, 2020 (link to presentation) 

Ben has recently been appointed the Dragon Capital Chair in Biodiversity Economics, sitting in the LEEP Institute at the University of Exeter and joined in July 2020. Prior to this he was a Professor at the London School of Economics. His research focusses primarily along two related strands; one of how to distribute resources across individuals within society (both now and in the future), and the other on the economics of biodiversity. As such, he founded and continues to run the BioEcon network. His research has appeared in many top journals including: The American Economic Review, American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, The Economic Journal and Science.

Brendan Fisher - Behavioral Science and Conservation: can behavioral economics deliver on sustainability goalsBrendan is a Professor at the University of Vermont. His research focusses on the valuation of ecosystem services, and the role of behavioural economics in shifting people towards pro-environmental behaviours. His work has appeared in many of the top journals, including Nature, Nature Climate Change and Proceeding of the National Academy of Sciences. (link to presentation)

Abstract: Human behavior has, and continues to, greatly impact our planet, and compromise the integrity of our climate and ecological systems. A suite of traditional approaches are in place to try to mitigate the impacts of individual or collective decisions on biodiversity and ecosystems, or to incentivize behaviors for better outcomes. Such approaches rely on an understanding of behavior as the result of rational decisions, albeit by sometimes ill-informed agents. These include taxes, fines, fees, payments, education, quotas, minimum standards and so on. Understanding the impacts of these approaches has largely been the role of economics and policy evaluation. Yet, increasingly we understand human behavior to be the result of a more complex decision-making process than merely a benefit-cost analysis, and therefore insights from behavioral science have delivered another set of potential approaches for nudging human decisions and resultant behavior. Such approaches are believed to often be cheaper to deliver and more palatable to those affected (e.g. better than taxes). Here we review some of the evidence regarding behavioral science-inspired approaches to mitigating the effects of large-impact, large-externality behaviors, highlight some successes of such approaches, expose some gaps in our evidence base, and then offer a framework for thinking more broadly than typical approaches of incentivizing individual producers and consumers. While the evidence of behavioral science-inspired approaches to mitigating human impacts on biodiversity and ecosystems is scant, the scope for such approaches to work is large, and largely untested.

Gretchen Daily -  Demonstration to Transformation:  Taking Natural Capital Approaches to Scale  - Gretchen is the Bing Professor of Environmental Science at Stanford University, as well as the Director of both the Center for Conservation Biology and the Natural Capital Project. Her research primarily focuses on how resources can be better managed for both biodiversity and people, and particularly on quantifying the flows or ecosystem services and stocks of natural capital across the landscape. There are few recognitions Gretchen has not been honoured with: she is a Fellow of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, the 2020 Tyler Prize Laureate, and a member of the LEEP Advisory Board. Her work has been published in all of the top journals including Nature, Science, and Proceeding of the National Academy of Sciences. 

 

Other environmental economics seminars

We also want to draw your attention to two further environmental economics seminar series organised by other intuitions.

  • GoSee seminars present 3-4 papers on a single theme within environmental economics in two hour sessions which typically run every other Wednesday, further information is available on their website here.
  • The SWELL series is a weekly one hour seminar on issues related to water economics each Tuesday – further information on those is available here.