Dr Carlos Cabrera-Tejedor

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Peter Chalk Centre 1.5

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Dr Carlos Cabrera-Tejedor (Oxford University) presents "The Seville Islamic Harbor"

NOTE NEW DATE & VENUE : IAIS Visiting Speaker Series

An Institute of Arab and Islamic Studies seminar
Date6 December 2018
Time17:15
PlacePeter Chalk Centre 1.5

Carlos has a diverse and multi-disciplinary background. He started as a conservator, completing two bachelor's degrees, one in Fine Arts Restoration and the other in Archaeological Conservation. He has also completed a Master of Arts degree in Nautical Archaeology from Texas A&M University and worked as a project and research associate at the Institute of Nautical Archaeology (INA).

Carlos started his post-doc in July 2016.  His work is focused on the archaeological analysis and computer-based 3D reconstruction of the hull of Ship 11, a riverine vessel from the Late Period found in the Grand Canal of the port of Thonis-Heracleion, Egypt.

Tea and coffee will be served from 4.30pm in the IAIS Common Room and then the lecture will be held in Peter Chalk 1.5.  All are welcome to attend and registration is not necessary.


Abstract

For his doctoral research, Carlos completed a DPhil in Archaeology at the University of Oxford.  His doctoral thesis focused on the history and development of the topography, layout, and facilities of the ancient port of Seville, which is located in the lower Guadalquivir River Basin.  From a maritime archaeology perspective, it combined terrestrial and maritime archaeological evidence, literary and epigraphic material, as well as palaeo-geomorphological and palaeo-environmental studies.  This thesis is a longue durée or diachronic study ranging bewteen the 1st century BC and the 13th century AD.  It is divided into three main historical periods, and in addition to the port itself, studies the palaeo-geomorphology and palaeo-hydrology of the Guadalquivir River, as well as of the palaeo-climatology of the region during each of these eras.  The main goal was to draw a picture of the antique and unknown port of Seville during these periods, focusing on port infrastructures and installations, trade networks, the ships that operated in the port, and other evidence pertaining to the maritime cultural landscape of Seville.

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