Research News

Rare examples of Anglo Saxon fake documents on display

Rare Anglo Saxon documents which show a Bishop hoped unconvincing forgeries might protect his property during the instability of the Norman Conquests can be seen by the public.

Climate emergency debated at University of Exeter

Hundreds of people gathered to discuss climate and environmental issues at the University of Exeter last night.

CBT could benefit mental health of children with long term conditions

The mental health of children and young people with some long term physical conditions could benefit from cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), according to a recent study from the University of Exeter Medical School.

Crabs’ camouflage tricks revealed

Crabs from a single species rely on different camouflage techniques depending on what habitat they live in, new research shows.

Wolf-dog ‘swarms’ threaten Europe’s wolves

“Swarms” of wolf-dog crossbreeds could drive Europe’s wolves out of existence, according to the lead author of new research.

Pupils inspired by the Ancient Greeks as they learn about the secrets of political power

Teenagers around the country may soon have the answer to dealing with rebellious MPs and Brexit as they train in a unique way to understand politics and power with tips from the Ancient Greeks and games like “rock-paper-scissors”.

Older male crickets attract more females – but have less sex

Older male crickets are better at getting females to live with them – but they mate less than younger rivals once they find a partner.

GPs report large numbers of patients suffering mental health issues linked to poverty

GPs in some surgeries estimate that up to half of their patients are seeking help for mental health issues caused or exacerbated by poverty, according to a new study.

Penguins and their chicks’ responses to local fish numbers informs marine conservation

How adult penguins fish and the body condition of their chicks are directly linked to local fish abundance, and could potentially inform fishery management, a new study has found

Research reveals insulin-producing beta cells may change function in diabetes

A revolutionary new study using only materials derived from humans has revealed that insulin-producing beta cells can change their function in diabetes – and that this change may be reversible.

Research shows carers’ experience can influence how well a person lives with dementia

New research has identified how a carer’s experience can impact on the ability of a person with dementia to ‘live well’ with the condition.

Victorian attempts to celebrate hirsute feats with new championship turned hairy

Victorian attempts to introduce the world’s first beard and moustache contest fell flat, when far fewer hairy entrants than expected turned up to have their facial furniture judged, research shows.

World-leading Exeter diabetes Professor named among Nation’s Lifesavers

World-renowned diabetes researcher Professor Andrew Hattersley has been named as one of ‘The Nation’s Lifesavers’ in the Made@Uni campaign.

Exeter rises in influential global rankings

Exeter has reinforced its position as being amongst the leading universities worldwide, according to the latest influential global rankings.

Teddy bears to show importance of clinical trials to families

If you go down to Princesshay, you’ll be in for a big surprise. Bring your teddy bears along, all shapes and styles, and learn about clinical trials.

Policy makers must attend to menstrual stigma to improve wellbeing, study finds

Researchers have found that addressing attitudes to menstruation may be necessary to improve well-being in low and middle-income countries, far more than simply better access to sanitary products.

Regular crosswords and number puzzles linked to sharper brain in later life

Older adults who regularly take part in word and number puzzles have sharper brains, according to the largest online study to date.

Five rules to tackle antibiotic resistance

Current efforts to tackle antibiotic resistance are “not nearly radical enough”, a leading scientist says.

£1.6m grant to improve building façade technologies for better energy efficiency

A pioneering project to create new technologies to improve the energy efficiency of buildings has begun, after receiving a substantial grant.

Pressure from advertisers and self-help gurus contribute to mid-life crises

Mid-life crises are caused by people feeling pressured by advertisers and self-help gurus to live a better life after they pass the age of 40, according to new research.

Exeter climate scientist secures distinguished international award

A world-leading climate scientist from the University of Exeter has been honoured with a prestigious international science award.

Leaders in machine learning and dementia research gather in Exeter

Experts in machine learning and dementia research convening at the University of Exeter identified that machine learning can be used to predict incorrect initial diagnoses.

Huge growth in use of quartz for tools shows sophistication of ancient communities

A growth in the use of crystal quartz to make tools thousands of years ago shows the sophistication of ancient communities, according to new research.

Can listening instead of just looking change attitudes to how we experience a day out at the zoo?

What can we hear if we stop and listen to the zoo? Does this change our experience of the animals we visit? Which species and what aspects of their behaviour come to the fore and what do we learn as a result?

Impact of horses on wellbeing and mental health measured in new research project

New research by the University of Exeter Business School will assess the benefits of a programme where horses are central to improving mental health and wellbeing.

Researchers take a step towards light-based brain-like computing chip

Scientists have unveiled a new integrated photonic hardware that can store and process information in ways similar to that of the human brain.

New electoral regulations must tackle “inequalities” caused by political advertising on Facebook

Regulators must find a way of monitoring and addressing the way political advertising on Facebook creates new types of inequalities for campaigners, experts have said.

‘Robopets’ can benefit health and wellbeing of older care home residents

Robotic pets that respond to human interaction can benefit the health and wellbeing of older people living in care homes, a study from the University of Exeter Medical School has found.

Cancer risk tools underused in general practice, research shows

Potentially life-saving cancer risk assessment tools are being widely underused by general practices across the UK, according to new research.

Rising research star receives prestigious fellowship

One of the new generation of rising research stars at the University of Exeter has received a prestigious national fellowship.

Study reveals how social relationships transform bird flocks

Flocks of birds may appear to move with a single mind, but new research shows jackdaws stick with their mates – even though it harms the flock.

Tinder-style approach could help organisations’ partnerships and projects to flourish

The fear of being rejected and losing face can have such a big impact that companies and policy-makers could consider introducing `Tinder-style’ matching environments, according to new research from the University of Exeter Business School.

Exeter experts join Ganges plastic pollution mission

Two University of Exeter scientists will be part of an international team studying plastic pollution in the River Ganges.

Banana disease boosted by climate change

Climate change has raised the risk of a fungal disease that ravages banana crops, new research shows.

Genetic data allows detailed picture of the history of inner Eurasia to be revealed for the first time

An international team of researchers has used genetic data from hundreds of people – as well as archaeological finds – to construct the most detailed picture of the history of inner Eurasia for the first time.

Early intervention could be key to battling invasive species

An international team of ecologists has carried out the first global meta-analysis of the characteristics and size of invasive alien species’ impacts on native species as invaders become more abundant.

How both mother and baby genes affect birth weight

The largest study of its kind has led to new insights into the complex relationships surrounding how mothers’ and babies’ genes influence birth weight.

CSM receive £1.3m software donation from global petroleum experts

Students at the Camborne School of Mines will be able to gain fascinating new insights into 3D geological modelling of the subsurface, though pioneering new software.

A third of type one diabetes is misdiagnosed in the over 30s

More than a third of people over the age of 30 who are initially diagnosed with type 2 diabetes actually have type 1, meaning they are not receiving the right treatment, new research has revealed.

Simple clinical features can help personalise type 2 diabetes treatment

A new study from the University of Exeter Medical School has shown that a person’s characteristics such as weight and age at diabetes diagnosis provide a simple way to select the diabetes drug that is likely to be best for them.

Bosses who put their followers first can boost their business

Companies would do well to tailor training and recruitment measures to encourage managers who have empathy, integrity and are trustworthy - because they can improve productivity, according to new research from the University of Exeter Business School.

World’s largest gathering for people with no ‘mind’s eye’ takes place in Exeter

The first ever conference for people with Aphantasia – no visual imagination – took place in Exeter, and is the largest known gathering of people who experience the phenomenon.

Exeter climate change experts feature in major new documentary

World-leading climate change experts from the University of Exeter will give a fascinating insight into the impacts of global warming when they appear on a hard-hitting BBC documentary.

Plymouth beavers plan – what do you think?

Scientists want to know what the people of Plymouth think about plans to release beavers into a fenced enclosure in the city.

Rare genetic change provides clues to pancreas development

Researchers have discovered a key clue into the development of the pancreas and brain by studying rare patients born without a pancreas.

Britain’s earliest bunny found at Roman palace

Experts have found the remains of Britain’s earliest rabbit - a discovery which reveals bunnies arrived in the country 1,000 years earlier than previously thought.

Call for evidence on climate change extended

The Committee on Climate Change has extended the deadline on a call for evidence to identify relevant published information about the risks and opportunities facing the UK from climate change.

Artist collaboration creates banner to showcase allotment experiences of dementia

A banner created by people with dementia working with a trio of well-known artists has been unfurled at a special ceremony in Exeter this month.

Experts gather for Cystic Fibrosis event

Cystic fibrosis experts will gather to discuss their research and share ideas at the University of Exeter.

Incredible collection of images of silent films can be seen for the first time

The only evidence left of lost films made in the golden era of silent movies can be seen for the first time after an unique collection was donated to one of the UK’s foremost cinema museums.

Lack of awareness of inequality means we penalise those who have least

People can automatically assume that someone who gives less money to charity is less generous, according to new research. The assumption was made in the study when people had no knowledge of how much someone had donated as a percentage of their overall income.  

Multi-million pound bid success for new Institute of Technology for the South West

University of Exeter celebrates multi-million pound collaborative bid success for new Institute of Technology for the South West

Identifying the grass pollen that gets up your nose

Scientists could be a step closer to providing more precise pollen forecasts to the 25% of the UK population who live with either asthma or hay fever.

Banned pesticides in Europe’s rivers

Tests of Europe’s rivers and canals have revealed more than 100 pesticides – including 24 that are not licensed for use in the EU.

Autism brings qualities which help at home and at work, study shows

Autism enhances characteristics such as loyalty and focus which help those with the condition at work and in their relationships with others, experts have found.

Research informs best outcomes on type 2 diabetes treatment

New research updates guidance to clinicians on how best to treat patients with type 2 diabetes who do not respond to glucose-lowering medication.

Research identifies genetic causes of poor sleep

The largest genetic study of its kind ever to use accelerometer data to examine how we slumber has uncovered a number of parts of our genetic code that could be responsible for causing poor sleep quality and duration.

Economics Can Help Tackle the Global Challenge of Antimicrobial Resistance

Applying the economics of climate change to antimicrobial resistance could help to avert the 10 million deaths that are predicted to occur by 2050 if urgent action isn’t taken, research involving the University of Exeter finds.

Exeter marine expert awarded prestigious medal for scientific contribution

One of the world’s foremost experts in fish ecology and bioacoustics has been awarded a prestigious prize from the Zoological Society of London (ZSL).

Do crickets have personalities?

Do some crickets like to get up early, while others prefer staying up late?

How do sounds of nature make you feel? Take part in national study

A new national experiment gets underway today, aiming to shed light on how ‘listening to nature’ could boost wellbeing.

Plentiful females keep male crickets young

Male crickets age more slowly if they have access to plenty of females, new research shows.

Successful home-based heart rehabilitation programme rolled out

A new rehabilitation programme which helps heart failure patients achieve better quality of life from the comfort of their own homes will now be rolled out at four NHS centres across the UK.

Complex artefacts don’t prove brilliance of our ancestors

Artefacts such as bows and arrows do not necessarily prove our ancestors had sophisticated reasoning and understanding of how these tools worked, new research suggests.

Major new study will rewrite history of human colonisation of South America

A major new study will uncover the secrets of how humans colonised one of the most challenging landscapes on earth - and the legacy of their actions on today’s plants and wildlife. 

Classrooms invited to join live Arctic adventure

Young people around the world will get the chance to explore the Arctic via live broadcasts from researchers.

Historic records shed light on the gender pay gap and forced labour in England’s past

Experts will use ancient records to discover the truth about how women worked centuries ago and the history of the gender pay gap and forced labour.

Exeter clinicians and researchers help shape proposals to improve stroke services in Northern Ireland

Pioneering work by a senior NHS clinician and a team of researchers at the University of Exeter Medical School, has been incorporated in proposals to improve stroke care for patients in Northern Ireland.

Diabetes Research shortlisted for The Guardian ‘Research Impact Award’

Research to improve diagnosis and treatment of diabetes by The University of Exeter Medical School has been shortlisted for The Guardian Research Impact Award.

Medical School head wins international award for brain research and leadership

The Executive Dean of the University of Exeter Medical School has won a prestigious international award recognising his outstanding research and leadership.

Exeter experts give insight into environmental impacts of modern-day lifestyle choices on award-winning series

University of Exeter experts will give a fascinating insight into environmental impacts of modern-day lifestyle choices when they appear on the BBC’s latest Blue Planet UK series.

Trial to answer dilemma of treating childhood epilepsy

One of the largest ever clinical trials in children with epilepsy, which aims to find out which treatment approach works best for children and their families, is launching today.

UK performers could face falling wages thanks to the gig economy, experts warn

The gig economy could drive down wages and de-professionalise the UK voice-over industry as jobs are increasingly advertised online, experts have warned.

Colourful male fish have genes to thank for their enduring looks

Striking traits seen only in males of some species – such as colourful peacock feathers or butterfly wings – are partly explained by gene behaviour, new research suggests.

£50,000 awarded to University of Exeter and partners to develop Environmental Intelligence bid

UK Research and Innovation has awarded 24 shortlisted projects £50,000 in seedcorn money from the Strength in Places Fund to boost regional economic growth. 

RAMM hosts dementia-friendly museum tours

Exeter’s popular museum is opening its doors to people living with dementia, and their carers, in a series of bespoke dementia-friendly events.

Attuned to others? Then you’re better able to judge the performance of a team

People who are naturally more attuned to others’ emotions are better able to judge how well small groups are performing, even when observation times are brief, according to a new study.

£762,000 Innovate UK award to commercialise world’s first anaesthetic recycling

The University of Exeter has partnered with a Westcountry-based medical equipment specialist to test a world first approach to recycling anaesthetics which are routinely used in operations.

Family raises £5,000 for research into disease that killed much-loved father

A Devon family have raised £5,200 to support research at the University of Exeter Medical School and Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital (RD&E), to investigate the disease that killed a much-loved husband and father.

Innovative health app to be showcased at national exhibition

An innovative app which helps patients to see real-time waiting times at their nearest hospitals and health centres has been chosen to be part of an interactive exhibition showcasing the impact of business and management research from around the UK.

Want to increase staff loyalty? You'll need to be seen as important, new research suggests

Offering praise and having a good working relationship isn’t always enough to engender loyalty from staff - employees also need to feel that the relationship with their boss is important, according to new research.

Art exhibition and first conference of people with no ‘mind’s eye’

The first ever exhibition of paintings and works of art created by artists who have no “mind’s eye” will cast new light on the creative brain when it goes comes to Exeter in March.

Uncertain projections help to reveal the truth about future climate change

A new study by a team of scientists from the US and the UK explains how differing climate model projections can be used collectively to reduce uncertainties in future climate change.

Research paves the way for next generation of optical tweezers

Scientists have developed a pioneering new technique that could pave the way for the next generation of optical tweezers.

Buying and selling cattle can link individual farms to thousands of other farms with each purchase

Understanding the complex networks of “contact chains” between British farms, could help identify potential routes for spread of infections and improve disease control strategies for the cattle industry.

Hat-trick of Success at the Diabetes UK Professional Conference

Three academics from the University of Exeter Medical School were recognised for research excellence at the Diabetes UK Professional Conference (DUKPC).

UK wild newt species free from flesh-eating fungus for now…

Wildlife conservation charity urges private amphibian traders to prevent Bsal fungus from infecting wild populations

Remarkable letter reveals earthquake drama for nuns in exile

Travelling around Europe in search of a new home after the dissolution of the monasteries must have been dramatic enough for England’s oldest community of Bridgettine nuns. But a remarkable newly-catalogued letter shows they also experienced another harrowing event – the Great Lisbon Earthquake of 1755.

International research prize awarded to Exeter neuroscientist

A University of Exeter researcher has been awarded the Cavanagh Prize, selected as the top nominee from candidates across Europe.

Professor Collects CBE from Buckingham Palace

A Professor who has helped make great strides in life-saving cancer diagnosis in the UK has collected his CBE from Buckingham Palace.

Largest-ever study identifies gene regions associated with sleep duration

A study has identified 76 new gene regions associated with sleep duration.

Experts to explore impact of queer films shown covertly to LGBT communities in China

A new research project will examine the impact of queer films shown covertly in China on the development of LGBT+ culture and rights.

Exeter diabetes expert recognised for positive patient impact

A world-leading diabetes specialist at the University of Exeter Medical School has received an NHS award for improving health outcomes for patients.

School children use University labs to bring supervillain to justice

Pupils from schools across Devon, Dorset and Somerset will use scientific techniques commonly seen in TV crime dramas to help solve the mystery of who sabotaged Devon’s very own Bake Off.

Exeter academic to be first nurse to give prestigious lecture at Diabetes UK conference

An academic from the University of Exeter Medical School is the first nurse ever to be awarded the Arnold Bloom lecture, at the Diabetes UK Professional Conference.

Nutritional supplements cannot prevent depression, research shows

A daily intake of nutritional supplements won’t help stave off the onset of depression, a new study has revealed.

Simple, cheap C-Peptide helps patients get the right diabetes diagnosis and treatment

A simple and inexpensive test to measure the body’s insulin levels is helping clinicians to determine what type of diabetes a patient has, meaning many people with diabetes can change treatment.

New VSimulators Facility To Boost Multi-Disciplinary Research in Exeter

A turf-cutting ceremony has taken place at Exeter Science Park to mark the start of construction on the University of Exeter’s pioneering VSimulators experimental facility.

Ice-free Arctic summers could happen on earlier side of predictions

The Arctic Ocean could become ice-free in the summer in the next 20 years due to a natural, long-term warming phase in the tropical Pacific that adds to human-caused warming, according to a new study. 

Exeter researcher nominated for Health Scientist of the Year

A world-leading diabetes specialist at the University of Exeter Medical School is one of only two nominated to receive the highly prestigious NHS Healthcare Scientist of the Year award.

Child anxiety could be factor in school absences, research concludes

New research has concluded that anxiety can be a factor in poor school attendance among children and young people.

Wanted: Pet owners whose cats take a walk on the wild side

The University of Exeter is seeking cat owners to become researchers for a new study designed to test different techniques to reduce the amount of wildlife killed by domestic cats, while maintaining and improving cat health and welfare.

Research changes GP guidelines on frailty in diabetes

New guidelines will help GPs get the best outcomes for older people with diabetes after they were changed to include specific advice around frailty.

Crohn’s Disease study reveals huge potential for personalised treatment to help more patients

The largest study ever to look at why an expensive and commonly used group of drugs fails patients with Crohn’s disease has concluded that standardised drug doses are often too low.

New continuity of care tracking method for GPs

New research has outlined a simple way to measure continuity of care for GPs, to benefit patients.

World leading researchers give insight into link between evolutionary medicine and early life effects

The quest to determine why people experience different long-term reactions to adversity in early life has received a new, ground-breaking boost.

Understanding the rich social lives of animals benefits international conservation efforts

An international group of researchers working on a wide range of species, from elephants and crows, to whales and chimpanzees, argues that animals’ cultural knowledge needs to be taken into consideration when planning international conservation efforts.

 

New genetic test improves safety of Inflammatory Bowel Disease treatments

A genetic discovery will make treatment for Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis safer, by identifying patients who are at risk of potentially deadly drug side effects.

Maasai farmers only kill lions when they attack livestock

Maasai farmers do not kill lions for retribution whenever they lose sheep or cattle, new research shows.