Dr Byron Creese

Exeter researcher scoops award at international dementia conference

An Exeter researcher has won an award at an international Alzheimer’s conference, in recognition of his work in contributing to possible new treatments for symptoms of neurodegenerative disease.

Dr Byron Creese, of the University of Exeter, has won a New Investigator Award, from the Alzheimer's Association International Society to Advance Alzheimer's Research and Treatment (ISTAART) Neuropsychiatric Syndromes (NPS) Professional Interest Area (PIA).

The award was presented as part of the world’s largest dementia conference, the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC), which launched in Los Angeles last weekend (July 13).

The award is given to early career scientists who have the potential to make significant original contributions to treatment development for neuropsychiatric syndromes in neurodegenerative diseases, such as dementia.

Dr Creese was recognised for work he has undertaken in the last year and is presenting at AAIC focusing on characterising the cognitive and genetic profile of late-life mild neuropsychiatric changes, which may represent early markers of dementia in some people. The finding emerges from the innovative online PROTECT study, in which 25,000 people aged 50 and over in the UK have signed up to help researchers understand how the brain ages and what factors can help prevent dementia.

Dr Creese said: “I’m delighted to receive this award. It’s a really exciting time to be investigating the the cognitive and genetic links to neuropsychiatric syndromes. Our goal is to contribute to the development of better, more targeted treatments and therapies and I’m looking forward to the future impact of our research in improving lives.”

Clive Ballard, Professor of Age Related Diseases at the University of Exeter Medical School, said: “Congratulations to Byron – this recognition is very well deserved. His work is part of an innovative approach that is helping shed light on how disease develops in later life. Dementia is a growing focus of our research at Exeter and I’m delighted to see our expertise celebrated in this way.”

Dr Byron Creese, of the University of Exeter, has won a New Investigator Award, from the Alzheimer's Association International Society to Advance Alzheimer's Research and Treatment (ISTAART) Neuropsychiatric Syndromes (NPS) Professional Interest Area (PIA).

The award was presented as part of the world’s largest dementia conference, the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC), which launched in Los Angeles last weekend (July 13).

 

The award is given to early career scientists who have the potential to make significant original contributions to treatment development for neuropsychiatric syndromes in neurodegenerative diseases, such as dementia.  

 

Dr Creese was recognised for work he has undertaken in the last year and is presenting at AAIC focusing on characterising the cognitive and genetic profile of late-life mild neuropsychiatric changes, which may represent early markers of dementia in some people. The finding emerges from the innovative online PROTECT study, in which 25,000 people aged 50 and over in the UK have signed up to help researchers understand how the brain ages and what factors can help prevent dementia.

 

Dr Creese said: "I’m delighted to receive this award. It’s a really exciting time to be investigating the the cognitive and genetic links to neuropsychiatric syndromes. Our goal is to contribute to the development of better, more targeted treatments and therapies and I’m looking forward to the future impact of our research in improving lives.”

 

Clive Ballard, Professor of Age Related Diseases at the University of Exeter Medical School, said: “Congratulations to Byron – this recognition is very well deserved. His work is part of an innovative approach that is helping shed light on how disease develops in later life. Dementia is a growing focus of our research at Exeter and I’m delighted to see our expertise celebrated in this way. “

Date: 13 July 2019

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