Skip to main content

COVID-19

Looking after your wellbeing is always important, but never more so than during the current COVID-19 outbreak which is impacting on countries around the world. It’s a worrying time and an enormous change to all our lives. Remember:

  • Remember to keep considering your wellbeing during COVID 19.
  • It’s perfectly natural to go through a wide range of emotions at times like this and there is no right way to feel.
  • Go to the Colleague Wellbeing pages for wellbeing information, tools and support or email occupationalhealth@exeter.ac.uk for confidential advice on choosing the right support for you.
  • If you need help for a mental health crisis, emergency or breakdown, you should get immediate expert advice and assessment: Urgent Help For Mental Health

The situation is evolving continually so we advise you to look up the most up-to-date information on the University’s webpages, the Public Health England website and NHS Info about COVID-19

Working from home

The situation is evolving continually so we advise you to look up the most up-to-date information on the University’s webpages

There is guidance available on the University website around setting up a home workstation and it is advisable to complete a DSE working from home assessment

It is important to take regular breaks away from your screen and move about. Workrave have an app you can install on your computer to remind you.

University's guidance for parents

Leading a Healthy and Positive Team (Remotely)

Working from home: Support for disabled colleagues

Keeping Healthy and Productive

Guidance on recording absence

Eye Strain: A Homeworking Guide

Please also remember that you can access further assistance from Spectrum Life which can be accessed 24/7 for telephone counselling via our online portal, as well as offering a range of well-being resources and guides.

For ongoing mild to moderate depression and anxiety it may also be appropriate to contact local NHS Every Mind Matters.

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced many of us to make significant adjustments to the way we work. A lot of us will be living with a heightened sense of anxiety and uncertainty.

Remember to keep considering your wellbeing during COVID-19 

  • Challenging circumstances continue to place our wellbeing under strain, we're here to provide you with the support and resources to help you manage. 
  • Work with your manager to set realistic hours and prioritise tasks, so that your workload is sustainable.   
  • The pandemic has created extra work for many of us and every individual effort is valued.

  
It’s perfectly natural to go through a wide range of emotions at times like this and there is no right way to feel.   

  • It is OK to be OK. It is OK to not be OK.    
  • Our feelings and reactions to COVID-19 may change over time.   
  • Stress, anxiety and periods of low mood are normal responses to COVID-19. These feelings are not a sign of weakness. They will normally pass. 

Go to the Colleague Wellbeing pages for wellbeing information, tools and support or email occupationalhealth@exeter.ac.uk for confidential advice on choosing the right support for you.   

  • For urgent medical support, or if you don’t feel safe, dial 999 or visit the Accident and Emergency Department at your local hospital (Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital 01392 411611/ Royal Cornwall Hospital 01872 250000).   
  • If you are contemplating suicide and are not immediately at risk, call Samaritans for free on 116 123. Support is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.  

For colleagues with existing mental health conditions or those who would like to take a more structured approach to their mental wellbeing, the Working from Home: Your Wellbeing Action Plan may be useful.

Please contact the Occupational Health team at occupationalhealth@exeter.ac.uk if you require any support or guidance.+

Other guidance:

Please also remember that you can access further assistance from Spectrum Life which can be accessed 24/7 for telephone counselling via our online portal, as well as offering a range of well-being resources and guides.

For some people COVID is a flu-like illness with no after effects. However, some people are experiencing longer term symptoms find these have a significant impact on their daily function, this may be referred to as “long COVID”.  However, this should be assessed and diagnosed by a medical professional.  Many viral illnesses can cause ongoing symptoms, even after the initial virus seems to have passed, this is to be expected.  Post COVID, it seems these symptoms can be more severe or variable.  

For more information about this condition, please see this guidance.

If you have questions or concerns about a particular condition, the NHS website provides good information.

Many of the individual charities have focused advice on particular conditions and offer support groups or online chats.

Coping with the loss of life under any circumstances is difficult but is even more challenging in the current situation.