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Study information

Programme Specification for the 2023/4 academic year

LLM International Law

1. Programme Details

Programme nameLLM International Law Programme codePTL1LAWLAW13
Study mode(s)Full Time
Academic year2023/4
Campus(es)Streatham (Exeter)
NQF Level of the Final Award7 (Masters)

2. Description of the Programme

Studying a Master of Laws in International Law offers a rewarding learning experience with opportunities to deepen your understanding of international law, and to acquire academic knowledge and inter-personal skills required for a career in the field of international law.

The Exeter LLM is a rigorous programme of postgraduate study designed for the most ambitious and capable students. Delivered by eminent scholars in international law, the Exeter LLM in International Law allows you to create a bespoke programme of learning addressing your specific academic and professional interests, readying you to fulfil your career ambitions or for doctoral study.

In order to enhance your research and learning experience, and to create a vibrant community of postgraduate students enrolled on this programme, you will be affiliated with one of the Law School’s research centres for the duration of your programme. This will provide a forum where, in particular, you can discuss your interests with fellow students and members of academic staff, and receive constructive feedback on your ideas.

3. Educational Aims of the Programme

1. To provide you with a comprehensive understanding of international law and pressing legal challenges in our globalised world.
2. To enable you to identify, locate and critically appraise legal materials and connect these to contemporary problems of international law.
3. To enable you to assimilate extensive documentary legal and non-legal materials; to extract from them the material points; and to make reasoned judgements autonomously as to their application to contemporary problems of international law.
4. To enable you to apply principles and rules of international law to solve and analyse contemporary problems of international law.
5. To enable you to reason logically, supporting your analysis with authority.
6. To provide you with the opportunity to enhance and develop your writing skills by completing a dissertation, and your oral skills by presenting seminar papers and/or your dissertation outline.
7. To prepare you for employment in the field of international law (e.g. law firms, international organisations, international courts, governmental and non-governmental organisations) by developing your transferable and problem-based learning skills.

4. Programme Structure

The LLM International Law programme is a one-year programme of study at National Qualification Framework (NQF) level 7 (as confirmed against the FHEQ). The programme has one ‘Stage’. For the purposes of this programme, a Stage is normally equivalent to a calendar year.

The programme is divided into units of study called modules, which are assigned a number of 'credits'. The credit rating of a module is proportional to the total workload, with 1 credit being nominally equivalent to 10 hours of work. You will take modules adding up to 180 credits. This will include taught modules totalling 120 credits and a 60-credit dissertation module. The dissertation can be written on a topic of your choice related to international law that is agreed by the Law School, under the supervision of a member of Law School staff.

The LLM programme starts in the autumn term. It is delivered over three terms and is University-based throughout this time. Taught components of the programme are delivered over the first (autumn) and second (spring) terms. The third term and most of the summer are dedicated to researching, writing and submitting your dissertation.

5. Programme Modules

The following tables describe the programme and constituent modules. Constituent modules may be updated, deleted or replaced as a consequence of the annual programme review of this programme.

The following tables describe the programme and constituent modules. Constituent modules may be updated, deleted or replaced as a consequence of the annual review of this programme. Details of the modules currently offered may be obtained from the College website: https://law.exeter.ac.uk/currentstudents/postgraduatemodules/.

Please note that modules are subject to change and not all modules are available across all programmes — this is due to timetable, module size constraints and availability.

You may take optional modules as long as any necessary prerequisites have been satisfied, where the timetable allows, and the module is at the appropriate level for the Stage.

 

Stage 1


Stage 1: 60-credit compulsory dissertation module, 120 credits of optional modules

In addition to the compulsory module listed below, you will study 120 credits of optional modules (60 credits in the autumn term and 60 credits in the spring term) chosen from the list of optional international law modules available in your year of academic study. You may choose to take 30 credits of module(s) outside the Law School, subject to availability and approval by the programme director.

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
LAWM640 Dissertation 60Yes

Optional Modules

Stage 1: 60-credit compulsory dissertation module, 120 credits of optional modules

In addition to the compulsory module listed below, you will study 120 credits of optional modules (60 credits in the autumn term and 60 credits in the spring term) chosen from the list of optional international law modules available in your year of academic study. You may choose to take 30 credits of module(s) outside the programme and/or the Law School, subject to availability and approval by the programme director. See https://law.exeter.ac.uk/currentstudents/postgraduatemodules/ for optional Law School modules.

 

The programme offers three specialisms, depending on your choice of modules:

International Law: minimum 90 credits International Law modules; 30 credits of modules of your own choice (from your programme, outside your programme and/or the Law School); 60 credits International Law dissertation.

International Law: Human Rights: minimum 90 credits International Law modules with minimum 60 credits Human Rights modules – see modules marked ‘a’; 30 credits of modules of your own choice (from your programme, outside your programme and/or the Law School); 60 credits International Law dissertation.

International Law: Conflict, Peace, and Justice: minimum 90 credits International Law modules with minimum 60 credits Conflict, Peace, and Justice modules – see modules marked ‘b’; 30 credits of modules of your own choice (from your programme, outside your programme and/or the Law School); 60 credits International Law dissertation.

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
LAWM145 Dignity, Democracy and the Law [a - See notes above] Term 115No
LAWM157 International Human Rights Law: United Nations System [a - See notes above] Term 115No
LAWM159 International Law of Armed Conflict [b - See notes above] Term 115No
LAWM162 The International Criminal Court: Law and Practice [b - See notes above] Term 115No
LAWM164 The Use of Force in International Law [b - See notes above] Term 115No
LAWM155 Human Rights and Digital Technologies [a - See notes above] Term 215No
LAWM156 International Crimes and Human Rights Abuses [b - See notes above] Term 215No
LAWM158 International Human Rights Law: Regional Systems [a - See notes above] Term 215No
LAWM161 Migration, citizenship and asylum in international law [a - See notes above] Term 215No
LAWM163 The International Law of Cyber Operations [b - See notes above] Term 215No
LAWM178 LLM Law Clinic Term 215No

6. Programme Outcomes Linked to Teaching, Learning and Assessment Methods

Intended Learning Outcomes
A: Specialised Subject Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

1. Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of international law and pressing legal challenges in select areas of international law.
2. Demonstrate the ability and skills to apply principles and rules of international law to solve and analyse contemporary problems of international law.

Specialised subject skills and knowledge (1-2) are acquired through classes (which may include lectures, seminars, workshops or other teaching activities, depending on the module), guided independent learning and reflection, library tuition and research support, formative assessment and summative assessment.

Specialised subject skills and knowledge (1-2) are assessed through essays; seen or unseen examinations; open/closed book examinations; and other formative and summative assessments of various types, depending on the modules selected for study.

Intended Learning Outcomes
B: Academic Discipline Core Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

3. Demonstrate the ability and skills to identify, locate and critically appraise legal materials and connect these to contemporary problems of international law.
4. Demonstrate the ability and skills to assimilate extensive documentary legal and non-legal materials; to extract from them the material points; and to make reasoned judgements autonomously as to their application to contemporary problems of international law.

Academic discipline core skills and knowledge (3-4) are acquired through classes (which may include lectures, seminars, workshops or other teaching activities, depending on the module), guided independent learning and reflection, library tuition and research support, formative assessment and summative assessment. 

Academic discipline core skills and knowledge (3-4) are assessed through essays; seen or unseen examinations; open/closed book examinations; and other formative and summative assessments of various types, depending on the modules selected for study.

Intended Learning Outcomes
C: Personal/Transferable/Employment Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

5. Demonstrate the ability to reason logically and support analysis with appropriate authority.
6. Apply intellectual and practical skills, such as problem-solving and legal reasoning, in developing a reasoned approach to contemporary problems of international law.
7. Apply advanced writing skills by completing a dissertation, and oral skills by presenting seminar papers and/or your dissertation outline.

Key skills (5-7) are an integral part of the degree programme. Particular aspects of the programme focus on personal and key skills development. For example, classes (lectures, seminars, workshops and other classes and skills activities, depending on the modules selected for study) encourage working independently and in groups, as well as presenting and critiquing ideas and materials in interesting and varied forms. Essays and other written work particularly encourage skills development. Personal tutor meetings and related activities encourage focus upon development of all key skills and the ability to reflect upon these.

  • Examination skills (5-6): this applies to all modules assessed by examination – see individual module details.
  • Dissertation, assessed essay and other coursework skills (5-7): this applies to all modules assessed by dissertation, essay or other forms of coursework – see individual module details.
  • Oral presentation skills (5-7): this applies to all modules involving oral contributions, whether assessed or unassessed – see individual module details.

7. Programme Regulations

Classification

Full details of assessment regulations for all taught programmes can be found in the TQA Manual, specifically in the Credit and Qualifications Framework, and the Assessment, Progression and Awarding: Taught Programmes Handbook. Additional information, including Generic Marking Criteria, can be found in the Learning and Teaching Support Handbook.

8. College Support for Students and Students' Learning

Personal and Academic Tutoring
It is University policy that all departments should have in place a system of academic personal tutors. Their role is to provide you with advice and support for the duration of your programme, and this support extends to signposting you to sources of support and guidance on personal difficulties such as accommodation, financial difficulties and sickness. You can also make an appointment to see individual teaching staff. The role of subject tutors is to support you with your studies in individual modules.

Information on the College Personal Tutoring system, library provision, ELE resources and access to College support services can be found on the College webpages for current students.

Student Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC)
SSLCs enable students and staff to jointly participate in the management and review of the teaching and learning provision.

9. University Support for Students and Students' Learning

Please refer to the University Academic Policy and Standards guidelines regarding support for students and students' learning.

10. Admissions Criteria

Undergraduate applicants must satisfy the Undergraduate Admissions Policy of the University of Exeter.

Postgraduate applicants must satisfy the Postgraduate Admissions Policy of the University of Exeter.

Specific requirements required to enrol on this programme are available at the respective Undergraduate or Postgraduate Study Site webpages.

11. Regulation of Assessment and Academic Standards

Each academic programme in the University is subject to an agreed College assessment and marking strategy, underpinned by institution-wide assessment procedures.

The security of assessment and academic standards is further supported through the appointment of External Examiners for each programme. External Examiners have access to draft papers, course work and examination scripts. They are required to attend the Board of Examiners and to provide an annual report. Annual External Examiner reports are monitored at both College and University level. Their responsibilities are described in the University's code of practice. See the University's TQA Manual for details.

(Quality Review Framework.

14. Awarding Institution

University of Exeter

15. Lead College / Teaching Institution

Faculty of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences (HASS)

16. Partner College / Institution

Partner College(s)

Not applicable to this programme

Partner Institution

Not applicable to this programme.

17. Programme Accredited / Validated by

0

18. Final Award

LLM International Law

19. UCAS Code

Not applicable to this programme.

20. NQF Level of Final Award

7 (Masters)

21. Credit

CATS credits

180

ECTS credits

90

22. QAA Subject Benchmarking Group

23. Dates

Origin Date

01/04/2014

Date of last revision

05/05/2023