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Study information

Programme Specification for the 2023/4 academic year

BA (Hons) Anthropology

1. Programme Details

Programme nameBA (Hons) Anthropology Programme codeUFA3HPSHPS30
Study mode(s)Full Time
Academic year2023/4
Campus(es)Streatham (Exeter)
NQF Level of the Final Award6 (Honours)

2. Description of the Programme

By studying Anthropology you can fully explore how relevant this discipline is for the study of our globalised world. Anthropology offers a distinctive comparative outlook on human social and cultural life. The discipline has traditionally focused on the study of small-scale and pre-industrial societies, and at Exeter you will have opportunities to learn about anthropological discoveries in this area. However, Anthropologists have increasingly applied their distinctive insights to modern living, and today are as interested in the practices of multinational companies and the impact of natural resource exploitation on local communities as in the rituals and ceremonies of native Amazonians.

At Exeter, you will be introduced to a range of core topics in current anthropological discussion and debate, and will also have the opportunity to take a variety of modules exploring topics such as human-animal interactions, global health, postcolonial politics, development, cultures of race and ethnicity, consumerism and the anthropology of music and sound.

Studying Anthropology will equip students with a full range of critical analytical perspectives as well as research methods to start their own exploration of the nature and complexity of human social life.

3. Educational Aims of the Programme

The aims of the Anthropology programme are to:

  • develop an awareness and understanding of the range of human cultural diversity;
  • encourage students to appreciate human cultural diversity from a variety of socio-cultural perspectives;
  • develop an appreciation of the dynamic character of anthropology and its constituent disciplines;
  • develop practical research skills alongside a critical awareness of various theoretical perspectives;
  • develop the students’ ability to apply knowledge and understanding to the principles and methods of anthropology and to demonstrate comprehension of the problematic and varied nature of research involving human subjects;
  • introduce students to the core areas of socio-cultural anthropological theory and practice and to provide and opportunity for reflection on current practice and developments in the field;
  • promote the practice of life-long learning and equipping students with the ability to work autonomously;
  • acquire a range of transferable skills, appropriate for the workplace or postgraduate study, which might include project design, writing and presentation skills, basic IT skills, and the ability to analyse data and to evaluate and present reasoned arguments.

4. Programme Structure

 

5. Programme Modules

The following tables describe the programme and constituent modules. Constituent modules may be updated, deleted or replaced as a consequence of the annual programme review of this programme.

You may take elective modules up to 30 credits outside of the programme in each stage as long as any necessary prerequisites have been satisfied, where the timetable allows and if you have not already taken the module in question or an equivalent module.

If you are interested in taking a module from outside your course or programme of study you should first discuss this with your academic tutor or programme leader. All module choice requests require the approval of your College (and the College offering the module) and should be fully justifiable on academic or career grounds.

The first year gives you a foundational knowledge of anthropological theory and concepts, and how to think critically about the key challenges of studying diverse human societies. You will also be introduced to the fundamentals of the archaeological study of human society in the past, and gain important analytical techniques that will be useful across a range of subjects and research tasks.

In the second year you will advance your grasp of anthropological knowledge and methods through a set of compulsory modules. You will learn about the current issues and problems that attract anthropologists’ attention, and acquire the research methods that anthropologists use in their studies; you will even develop your own small research project where you can put these skills to the test. Optional modules enable you to develop specialist knowledge on a range of topics.

The centre-point of the final year is the dissertation. This provides you with the opportunity to explore an area of interest and to demonstrate what you have learned over the previous years of your degree. You will also take up to three other specialist modules to create a programme of work fully reflecting your interests.

Stage 1


90 credits of compulsory modules, 30 credits of optional modules.

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
ANT1003 Imagining Social Worlds: Texts 15No
ANT1004 Introduction to Social Anthropology-Theorising the Everyday World 15No
ANT1005 Introduction to Social Anthropology: Exploring Cultural Diversity 15No
ANT1009 Theories and Approaches in Anthropology 15No
ARC1010 Themes in World Archaeology 15No
ANT1011 Imagining Social Worlds: Qualitative Research 15No

Optional Modules

View option modules here.

 

Please note that modules are subject to change and not all modules are available across all programmes, this is due to timetable, module size constraints and availability

Stage 2


60 credits of compulsory modules, 60 credits of optional modules.

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
ANT2002 Ethnography Now 15No
ANT2003 Current Debates in Anthropology 15No
ANT2004 Into the Field 15No
ANT2005 Current Debates in Anthropology: Practice 15No

Optional Modules

View option modules here.

 

Please note that modules are subject to change and not all modules are available across all programmes, this is due to timetable, module size constraints and availability

Stage 3


30 credits of compulsory modules, 90 credits of optional modules.

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
ANT3040 Anthropology Dissertation 30No

Optional Modules

View option modules here.

 

Please note that modules are subject to change and not all modules are available across all programmes, this is due to timetable, module size constraints and availability


6. Programme Outcomes Linked to Teaching, Learning and Assessment Methods

Intended Learning Outcomes
A: Specialised Subject Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

1. Demonstrate an understanding of social anthropology as the comparative study of human societies.
2. Show an appreciation of the importance of empirical fieldwork as the primary method of gathering data and is the basis for the generation of anthropological theory.
3. Demonstrate a detailed knowledge of specific themes in social anthropology (including kinship, gender,sexuality, power, ethics , politics,economics, subsistence, environment, religion, globalisation, communication and representation) and the intellectual debates concerning them.
4. Display a realisation that knowledge is contested, and that anthropology by its nature is dynamic, constantly generating new priorities and theories.
5. Show an informed awareness of and sensitivity to human diversity, an appreciation of its scope and complexity and recognition of the richness of experience and potential it provides.
6. Show an acquaintance with the theory and history of anthropology.
7. Display knowledge of the values, ethics and traditions of different cultures, including a detailed knowledge of particular areas of the world as a result of regionally focussed courses.
8. Display a familiarity with a range of methods of representing data.
9. Show a reflexive awareness of ethical issues concerned with the study of social worlds and representation of others, of the nature of knowledge, and the role of the anthropologist or ethnographer in the collection and presentation of data.
10. Show an awareness of social and historical change, and knowledge of some paradigms and modes (including indigenous ones) for explaining it.
11. Show an appreciation of the interconnections between various aspects of social and cultural life, belief systems, global forces, individual behaviour and the physical environment.

See: Marketing Learning Teaching and Assessment Methods

 

 

See: Marketing Learning Teaching and Assessment Methods

 

Intended Learning Outcomes
B: Academic Discipline Core Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

12. Understand how human beings are shaped by and interact with their social, cultural and physical environments.
13. Provide ethnographic description and analysis.
14. Interpret a range of texts within their historical, social and theoretical contexts.
15. Apply anthropological knowledge to a variety of practical situations, personal and professional.
16. Plan, undertake and present scholarly work that demonstrates an understanding of anthropological aims, methods and theoretical considerations.

See: Marketing Learning Teaching and Assessment Methods

 

See: Marketing Learning Teaching and Assessment Methods

 

Intended Learning Outcomes
C: Personal/Transferable/Employment Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

17. Demonstrate independence of thought and analytical, critical and synoptic skills.
18. Demonstrate communication and presentation skills (using oral and written materials and information technology).
19. Display scholarly skills, such as an ability to make a structured argument, reference the works of others, and assess different forms of evidence.
20. Show time planning and management skills.

See: Marketing Learning Teaching and Assessment Methods

 

See: Marketing Learning Teaching and Assessment Methods

 

7. Programme Regulations

Classification

Full details of assessment regulations for all taught programmes can be found in the TQA Manual, specifically in the Credit and Qualifications Framework, and the Assessment, Progression and Awarding: Taught Programmes Handbook. Additional information, including Generic Marking Criteria, can be found in the Learning and Teaching Support Handbook.

8. College Support for Students and Students' Learning

9. University Support for Students and Students' Learning

Please refer to the University Academic Policy and Standards guidelines regarding support for students and students' learning.

10. Admissions Criteria

Undergraduate applicants must satisfy the Undergraduate Admissions Policy of the University of Exeter.

Postgraduate applicants must satisfy the Postgraduate Admissions Policy of the University of Exeter.

Specific requirements required to enrol on this programme are available at the respective Undergraduate or Postgraduate Study Site webpages.

11. Regulation of Assessment and Academic Standards

Each academic programme in the University is subject to an agreed College assessment and marking strategy, underpinned by institution-wide assessment procedures.

The security of assessment and academic standards is further supported through the appointment of External Examiners for each programme. External Examiners have access to draft papers, course work and examination scripts. They are required to attend the Board of Examiners and to provide an annual report. Annual External Examiner reports are monitored at both College and University level. Their responsibilities are described in the University's code of practice. See the University's TQA Manual for details.

(Quality Review Framework.

14. Awarding Institution

University of Exeter

15. Lead College / Teaching Institution

Faculty of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences (HASS)

16. Partner College / Institution

Partner College(s)

Not applicable to this programme

Partner Institution

Not applicable to this programme.

17. Programme Accredited / Validated by

0

18. Final Award

BA (Hons) Anthropology

19. UCAS Code

L600

20. NQF Level of Final Award

6 (Honours)

21. Credit

CATS credits ECTS credits

22. QAA Subject Benchmarking Group

[Honours] Anthropology

23. Dates

Origin Date

01/05/2012

Date of last revision

26/07/2019