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Study information

Programme Specification for the 2023/4 academic year

BA (Hons) Theology and Religion with Employment Experience Abroad

1. Programme Details

Programme nameBA (Hons) Theology and Religion with Employment Experience Abroad Programme codeUFA4CTHCTH10
Study mode(s)Full Time
Part Time
Academic year2023/4
Campus(es)Streatham (Exeter)
NQF Level of the Final Award6 (Honours)

2. Description of the Programme

The BA in Theology and Religion with Employment Experience Abroad gives you an excellent grounding in all the subjects essential to a good understanding of the discipline of Theology, from biblical studies and church history to modern theology, philosophy and ethics, and gives you increasing flexibility and choice as you progress through the stages of the degree. The programme enables you to explore the contexts, development and meanings of the texts of the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament (with the option of studying the texts in the original languages). You’ll also study the whole history of Christian theological thought, including aspects of Christianity’s relationship to other religions; the critical questions, philosophical, political, ethical and historical, raised in the modern and postmodern world about religion in general and the Christian religion specifically; and the critical questions raised by the Christian religion about the world.

You will also be able to customise your degree by choosing from a long list of modules covering issues as diverse as sexuality, criminal justice, feminism, the environment, science, anthropology, evolution, art, the body, the soul, heaven and hell, heresy, morality and ethics, martyrs and pilgrimage, life after death, and study of religions.

Opportunities are available to add value to your academic studies by going on field trips, taking a work placement, or studying abroad. You can also take modules in Biblical Hebrew and New Testament Greek or take credits in subjects such as Arab and Islamic Studies, Sociology, Philosophy, Politics, History or Classics, many of which offer modules directly related to theological debates, world religions, ethics and philosophy.

This Employment Experience variant of the programme is a great way to incorporate graduate-level work placement or placements undertaken outside of the United Kingdom directly into your programme of study, to reflect critically upon these experiences, and for them to count towards the assessment of your degree. There is no better way to gain valuable employment experience that can be rewarded and recognised clearly by future employers. With preparation, support and approval from the College of Humanities, including in foreign languages if required, you can also demonstrate adaptability and resourcefulness by organising suitable placements in areas of employment related to your interests and potential future career. This variant of the programme also provides a great way to demonstrate to employers your adaptability, cultural awareness, independence and resourcefulness. Experiencing the differences and similarities of education and people in another culture will increase your confidence and broaden the ways in which you see and relate to the world and the world of work.

You are required to find your own placement with suitable employers and organisations with preparation, support and approval from the College of Humanities. Students taking this variant are strongly encouraged to take HUM2000 or HUM2001 (Humanities in the Workplace) at stage 2 and must participate in the pre-departure briefing sessions for Humanities Employment Experience Abroad.

Advice and guidance on your programme can be sought from your personal tutor and programme director. All staff offer regular office hours that you can drop into without a prior appointment for this purpose.

3. Educational Aims of the Programme

The BA in Theology and Religion with Employment Experience Abroad aims to:

  • enable you to encounter a broadly-based core which introduces wider multidisciplinary contexts required for the subject, and develops specialised in depth study of aspects of the field. This implies not just mastery of data but also the setting of these data within theoretical frameworks, which include critical analysis and debate about how to understand, interrogate and structure material.
  • enable you to encounter Christianities and Judaisms, ancient and modern, including origins, histories and/or present characters of each.
  • study, analyse and interpret texts, sometimes in the original languages, particularly texts that have been sacred or significant to one or more practising communities. These studies will often focus both on the historical contexts that generated the texts and on hermeneutical questions concerning their meaning and application for the appropriate community of believers in the present, or for other readers today.
  • engage with some of the major religious thinkers, prophets, teachers, ascetics, mystics, healers, or leaders through their extant work or subsequent influence.
  • apply a variety of critical methods of study, often adapted from those of other subjects in the humanities and social sciences, to the study of texts, practices, religious communities as social and cultural entities, or their diverse material culture and art forms.
  • understand the history of the particular subject(s) covered by the programme, including the major theories, movements and thinkers.
  • engage with ethics, morality, and values. All religions have certain expectations in these areas, which are studied along with other aspects of the religion. The values and problems for living in a multicultural and diverse world as an adherent of religion do not go unnoticed by the student

4. Programme Structure

5. Programme Modules

The following tables describe the programme and constituent modules. Constituent modules may be updated, deleted or replaced as a consequence of the annual programme review of this programme.

www.intranet.exeter.ac.uk/humanities/studying/undergraduates/modules/

You may take optional modules as long as any necessary prerequisites have been satisfied, where the timetable allows and if you have not already taken the module in question or an equivalent module. 

You may take elective modules up to 30 credits outside of the programme in any stage of the programme as long as any necessary prerequisites have been satisfied, where the timetable allows and if you have not already taken the module in question or an equivalent module.

Stage 1


Stage 1: 90 credits of compulsory modules, 30 credits of optional modules

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
THE1076 Religion in the Modern World 15No
THE1101 The Bible: Past and Present 15No
THE1103 Introducing Christian Theologies 15No
THE1106 Philosophy of Religion and Christian Ethics 15No
THE1109 Introduction to the History and Literatures of the Bible 15No
THE1110 The History of Early Christianities 15No
HAS1905 Employment Experience HASS 0No

Optional Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
THE S1 BA T&R SH opt 2023-4
THE1109 Introduction to the History and Literatures of the Bible 15 No
THE1106 Philosophy of Religion and Christian Ethics 15 No
THE1101 The Bible: Past and Present 15 No
THE1103 Introducing Christian Theologies 15 No
THE1076 Religion in the Modern World 15 No
THE1110 The History of Early Christianities 15 No
THE1070 Elements of New Testament Greek 15 No
THEM124 Elements of New Testament Greek 15 No
THE2034 Intermediate New Testament Greek 15 No
THEM126 Intermediate New Testament Greek 15 No
ARA1038 Religious Minorities of the Middle East 15 No
ARA1018 Introduction to Islam 15 No

Stage 2


Stage 2: 120 credits of optional modules

You can only select one module from this group: either HUM2000 or HUM2001

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
HAS2905 Employment Experience HASS 0No

Optional Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
THE Stage 2 CH Theology and Religion option modules 2023-4
THE2147 Early Christian Women: Eve, Mary, Thecla 30 No
THE2226 The Transformation of Modern Orthodox Christianity 30 No
THE2224 Modern Jewish History and Thought 30 No
THE2185 Incarnation: Topics in Philosophical Theology 30 No
THE2221 God, Food, and Alcohol in Israelite Cultures 30 No
THE2223 Introduction To Indian Philosophy (Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism) 30 No
THE2152 Evolution, God and Gaia 30 No
THE2173 Life and Death in Israel and Judah 30 No
THE2227 Military Ethics in Religious and Philosophical Perspectives 30 No
THE2225 Trans Studies in Christianity and Judaism 30 No
HUM HUM2000-HUM2001 [see note a above]
HUM2000 Humanities in the Workplace 30 No
HUM2001 Humanities in the Workplace 15 No

Stage 3


Stage 3: 120 credits of compulsory modules

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
HUM3997 Employment Experience Abroad 120Yes

Stage 4


Stage 4: 30 credits of compulsory Dissertation, 90 credits of optional modules

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
THE3082 Theology Dissertation 30No

Optional Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
THE Final Stage CH Theology and Religion option modules 2023-4
THE3147 Early Christian women: Eve, Mary, Thecla 30 No
THE3225 Trans Studies in Christianity and Judaism 30 No
THE3227 Military Ethics in Religious and Philosophical Perspectives 30 No
THE3173 Life and Death in Israel and Judah 30 No
THE3152 Evolution, God and Gaia 30 No
THE3223 Introduction To Indian Philosophy (Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism) 30 No
THE3221 God, Food, and Alcohol in Israelite Cultures 30 No
THE3185 Incarnation: Topics in Philosophical Theology 30 No
THE3224 Modern Jewish History and Thought 30 No
THE3226 The Transformation of Modern Orthodox Christianity 30 No

6. Programme Outcomes Linked to Teaching, Learning and Assessment Methods

Intended Learning Outcomes
A: Specialised Subject Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

1. demonstrate detailed and critical understanding of biblical texts, the contexts of their production and reception, and aspects of their ongoing interpretation;
2. demonstrate detailed and critical understanding of a range of classic texts from the Christian theological tradition in their historical contexts, and of their importance for ongoing theological debate
3. demonstrate detailed and critical understanding of the main themes of Christian doctrine, of aspects of their history, and of current debates surrounding their meaning and implications;
4. demonstrate detailed and critical understanding of a range of questions in philosophical theology, and of the current debates surrounding them;
5. demonstrate detailed and critical understanding of a range of personal, ethical and political questions raised by Christian theology, and of contemporary debates surrounding them;

ILOs 1-5 form the basis of the programme at all levels. However, more sophisticated analysis and understanding is expected in the final stage. These skills are developed in stages 1 and 2 by means of lectures, which are a key element of module teaching methods and are used to provide information, and to model modes of argument and interpretation. There is also an element of interaction in lectures, whether that be simply an opportunity for questions, or more substantial elements such as ‘buzz group’ sessions, full class discussions, breaking down into small group conversations. The prevalence of such interactivity tends to increase over the three or four stages, as you increase in your ability and willingness to contribute publicly to discussion.

Seminar presentations are another key element of module teaching methods. During stage 1, you will be required to prepare and deliver short seminar presentations according to clear and detailed guidelines, normally not summatively assessed. In stages 2 and 3, seminar presentations are normally more substantial, and frequently summatively assessed. Some seminar presentations are prepared and delivered by groups rather than simply by individual. Seminar presentations are normally accompanied by written handouts. Seminars regularly involve students in commentary upon specific primary texts and/or specific secondary texts.

The assessments of ILO’s 1-5 are made through a combination of seminar presentations, written work, and in particular by essays of varying kinds and lengths. During stage 1, you will begin with fairly short formatively assessed essays, and will move on from these to summatively assessed essays only once you have received feedback on them. Small group tutorials are often provided to prepare essays for summative assessment.

ILO’s1-5 are also, in part, assessed by written examinations, which normally involve you either answering essay-style questions, or commenting on short extracts from primary texts, within a fixed time-limit. Examinations show how well you can recall material, arguments, and points of view, express these concisely and use them creatively in arguing for a particular case in answer to previously unknown questions.

Intended Learning Outcomes
B: Academic Discipline Core Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

6. demonstrate comprehension of and intelligent engagement with the richness of at least one religious tradition in its varied and central forms;
7. state clearly, discuss and demonstrate critical comprehension of some of the following: social, textual, intellectual, historical, theological, ritual, ethical, institutional or aesthetic expressions of the religion(s) studied;
8. discuss and demonstrate where appropriate critical comprehension of the religion(s) classical sources and their subsequent interpretation in different historical periods and in different social or geographical settings;
9. evaluate and critically analyze a diversity of primary and secondary sources, including materials from different disciplines;
10. demonstrate comprehension of and critically analyse a range of themes, debates and methods of the discipline and where appropriate related disciplines (e.g., history, philosophy) and evaluate a range of critical scholarship associated with this discipline;
11. demonstrate sophisticated understanding of the multi-faceted complexity of religions, for example in the relationship between specifically religious beliefs, texts, practices and institutions, and wider social and cultural structures, norms, aesthetics and aspirations;
12. demonstrate intellectual flexibility through the practice of a variety of complementary methods of study: philosophical, historical, and systematic/dogmatic;
13. demonstrate awareness of and critical assessment of aspects of religious contributions to debate in the public arena about values, truth, beauty, identity, health, peace and justice;
14. demonstrate a sophisticated understanding of how personal and communal identities and motivations are shaped by religion, how this has both constructive and destructive effects, and how important such identities are;

ILO’s 6-14 are delivered through all modules, and developed throughout the programme by means of lectures, essay writing, workshops, discussions and oral presentations in seminars and study groups, tutorials, work experience and other learning activities throughout the programme.

In the second and final stages you are expected to prepare longer and more sophisticated seminar presentations, and write longer essays in order further to develop these skills. In the final stage there is a focus on developing, in the context of your particular subjects, the more complex analytical skills listed opposite.

 

The assessment of ILO’s 6-14 is made through a combination of essays, examinations and written work which involve detailed textual commentary on primary texts and secondary texts in which you are expected to note in particular the disagreements between various authors.

ILO’s 6-8, 10-14: You will also be expected to demonstrate most clearly that you appreciate the complexity of your subject matter, that you are becoming proficient with the appropriate methods of study, and that you are capable of building convincing arguments backed up by appropriate evidence.

ILO9: As the stages progress, you will find an increasing expectation that you will explore bibliographies for yourself, find the most appropriate literature on them, and begin to develop the ability to locate additional material for yourself. This progression also includes the use of online materials, where students are given very careful guidelines on appropriate sources earlier on, and then helped to develop the judgment to make more independent use of online materials as the programme progresses.

Intended Learning Outcomes
C: Personal/Transferable/Employment Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

15. undertake independent work within broad guidelines;
16. shape information independently into a coherent and creative account;
17. demonstrate critical and creative thought;
18. make critical and independent use of written sources;
19. find, evaluate and use on-line materials;
20. demonstrate sensitive and critical understanding of the differences between the practices and traditions of various groups;
21. reflect critically on their own learning experience;
22. communicate clearly in written and oral forms;
23. participate appropriately in a learning group;
24. discuss sensitive issues with appropriate generosity.

Personal and key skills are delivered through all modules, and developed in lectures, workshops, study groups, tutorials, work experience and other learning activities throughout the programme.

ILO’s 15-18 and 22 are developed though the dissertation, which involves students negotiating a question with a supervisor and, with minimal guidance, producing an independent, creative and critical answer to that question.

ILO’s 19, 23 and 24 are developed through the preparation and delivery of oral presentations in most modules at all levels, and through the oral discussion of challenging material in all modules in the programme, in both seminars and tutorials.

ILO 19 and 20 are developed through researching essays, seminar presentations, and the dissertation (if chosen).

ILOs 20 and 21 developed through examinations at all levels and through written assignments at all levels.

ILO 22 is developed through participation in study groups with other students in most modules in the programme. It is also developed through meetings with personal tutors, one-to-one tutorials giving feedback on written work and through discussion in seminars.

The assessment of these skills is through a combination of presentations and participation in seminars, log-books, web-based assessments, essays, exams, other written reports/projects, and a dissertation.

Outcomes C15-20 are also strongly developed in the course of the portfolio of assessed essays
and other written work produced through Stages 1, 2, and 3. These assessments work on the principle of offering formative feedback to support the development of your written work within as well as between modules. Feedback on one assignment is intended to inform the next piece of work you undertake on the module; the next piece of work on the programme, or the future learning of graduates.

Outcome C21 is associated especially with a learning journal for a core module in which you are encouraged to reflect critically upon your own learning. In other modules lecturers provide more informal means by which students can discuss their reactions to and
difficulties with the material they are studying, the methods by which it is approached, and the assumptions which they, their fellow students, and their teachers bring to the study.

C22-24 are also accomplished in the course of ‘real-time’ formal assessments such as presentations and end of module exams, which occur in all three levels of the programme.

7. Programme Regulations

Programme-specific Progression Rules

To progress to Stage 2 you must normally achieve an average mark of at least 50% in Stage 1. If you do not achieve an average mark of 50% in Stage 1, you will be interviewed to determine whether you can continue on the Employment Experience Abroad programme; if you do not succeed in that interview you will be required to transfer to the three-year programme. This is to ensure that only those students who are likely to succeed in their Employment Experience are selected. If you are unsuccessful in your application for Employment Experience Abroad, you will be transferred to the three-year programme.

HUM3997 Employment Experience Abroad counts as a single 120 credit module and is not condonable; you must pass this module to graduate with the degree title of BA Theology and Religion with Employment Experience Abroad. If you fail the Employment Experience Abroad your degree title will be commuted to BA Theology and Religion.

Classification

Full details of assessment regulations for all taught programmes can be found in the TQA Manual, specifically in the Credit and Qualifications Framework, and the Assessment, Progression and Awarding: Taught Programmes Handbook. Additional information, including Generic Marking Criteria, can be found in the Learning and Teaching Support Handbook.

8. College Support for Students and Students' Learning

All students in Theology and Religion have a personal tutor for their entire programme of study and who are available at advertised ‘office hours’ (staff changes are likely due to Research Leave etc.). There are induction sessions to orientate students at the start of their programme. A personal tutoring system will operate with regular communication throughout the programme. Academic support will be also be provided by module leaders. You can also make an appointment to see individual teaching staff.

Programme handbooks and other useful information can be accessed via the student intranet: http://intranet.exeter.ac.uk/humanities/studying/taughthandbook/ .

Other useful information and student resources can be accessed via the Exeter Learning Environment (ELE): http://vle.exeter.ac.uk/login/index.php  , which has specific information on library skills, essay writing and research skills.

The College complies with the Code of Practice on Study and Work Experience Abroad. The name of the member of staff acting as the programme’s co-ordinator for study abroad is made known to you before you leave Exeter, and this person is responsible for liaison and oversight of your progress during the year abroad. Contact will be maintained with you during your year abroad by regular email communication.

9. University Support for Students and Students' Learning

Please refer to the University Academic Policy and Standards guidelines regarding support for students and students' learning.

10. Admissions Criteria

Undergraduate applicants must satisfy the Undergraduate Admissions Policy of the University of Exeter.

Postgraduate applicants must satisfy the Postgraduate Admissions Policy of the University of Exeter.

Specific requirements required to enrol on this programme are available at the respective Undergraduate or Postgraduate Study Site webpages.

11. Regulation of Assessment and Academic Standards

Each academic programme in the University is subject to an agreed College assessment and marking strategy, underpinned by institution-wide assessment procedures.

The security of assessment and academic standards is further supported through the appointment of External Examiners for each programme. External Examiners have access to draft papers, course work and examination scripts. They are required to attend the Board of Examiners and to provide an annual report. Annual External Examiner reports are monitored at both College and University level. Their responsibilities are described in the University's code of practice. See the University's TQA Manual for details.

(Quality Review Framework.

14. Awarding Institution

University of Exeter

15. Lead College / Teaching Institution

Faculty of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences (HASS)

16. Partner College / Institution

Partner College(s)

Not applicable to this programme

Partner Institution

Not applicable to this programme.

17. Programme Accredited / Validated by

0

18. Final Award

BA (Hons) Theology and Religion with Employment Experience Abroad

19. UCAS Code

V614

20. NQF Level of Final Award

6 (Honours)

21. Credit

CATS credits

480

ECTS credits

240

22. QAA Subject Benchmarking Group

[Honours] Theology and religious studies

23. Dates

Origin Date

22/08/2017

Date of last revision

28/05/2021