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Programme Specification for the 2024/5 academic year

BA (Hons) Classical Studies and Theology with Employment Experience Abroad

1. Programme Details

Programme nameBA (Hons) Classical Studies and Theology with Employment Experience Abroad Programme codeUFA4CTHCTH18
Study mode(s)Full Time
Part Time
Academic year2024/5
Campus(es)Streatham (Exeter)
NQF Level of the Final Award6 (Honours)

2. Description of the Programme

The BA (Hons) Classical Studies and Theology with Employment Experience Abroad connects the earliest branch of the humanities with one of the most stimulating and challenging programmes of study. A degree in Classics at Exeter enables you to understand an ancient world that has fundamentally impacted the society we live in today, whilst Theology puts emphasis on how religious faith, practice and experience has shaped the world we live in.

In Classics, you will focus on Ancient Rome and Ancient Greece, which form the cornerstones of our modern Western civilisation. You will learn to interpret their language, literature, art and culture to unlock new ways of thinking and understand ancient history in context to current issues such as power, sexuality, ethics, migration, identity, magic, food, globalisation and religion. Not only will you emerge as an accomplished researcher, you will have a deep understanding of classical languages and the confidence to analyse, interpret and challenge traditional theories and concepts.

In Theology, you will expand on your classical studies to look at the bible, Judaism and Christianity, religious philosophy, science and religion, theology and art. You will cover a range of disciplines such as history, literary criticism, language study, sociology, anthropology and art history to seek answers to some of the greatest unknowns facing humanity. Is there a meaning and purpose to our existence? Is there a God or gods? How do we decide what is right or wrong in relation to war and peace, birth and death, sex and the environment? With the support of our talented and enthusiastic staff, you will gain the confidence to pose complex ethical and philosophical questions that tackle areas of controversy. By critically analysing sources, interpreting and translating religious texts and understanding objects and practices in sacred and secular settings, you will learn to form and express opinions to draw insights into issues of the modern day.

As with all our classically-based degrees, you will graduate with a solid foundation of transferable skills including; communication, persuasion, problem-solving, critical analysis and collaborative working. This will be reinforced by your new-found ability to analyse arguments, criticise texts, debate and write well-argued essays. Recent graduates are now working in areas such as the Civil Service, finance, education, law and journalism with organisations like the NHS, St Monica Trust, Parliament, British Armed Forces and Accenture.

This programme is studied over four years. The first two years and the final year are university-based, and the third year is spent gaining employment experience at a suitable location abroad.

This Employment Experience Abroad variant of the programme is a great way to incorporate graduate-level work placement or placements undertaken outside of the United Kingdom directly into your programme of study, to reflect critically upon these experiences, and for them to count towards the assessment of your degree. There is no better way to gain valuable employment experience that can be rewarded and recognised clearly by future employers. With preparation, support and approval from the College of Humanities, including in foreign languages if required, you can also demonstrate adaptability and resourcefulness by organising suitable placements in areas of employment related to your interests and potential future career. This variant of the programme also provides a great way to demonstrate to employers your adaptability, cultural awareness, independence and resourcefulness. Experiencing the differences and similarities of education and people in another culture will increase your confidence and broaden the ways in which you see and relate to the world and the world of work.

You are required to find your own placement with suitable employers and organisations with preparation, support and approval from the College of Humanities. If you are taking this variant you are strongly encouraged to take HUM2000 or HUM2001 (Humanities in the Workplace) at stage 2 and must participate in the pre-departure briefing sessions for Humanities Employment Experience Abroad.

Advice and guidance on your programme can be sought from your personal tutor and programme director. All staff offer regular office hours that you can drop into without a prior appointment for this purpose.

Advice and guidance on your programme can be sought from your personal tutor and programme director. All staff offer regular office hours that you can drop into without a prior appointment for this purpose.

3. Educational Aims of the Programme

The programme will offer you a structured framework of study in which you follow a balanced and complementary range of modules, with sufficient choice to ensure that you are able to follow an individual pathway of learning. The programme further aims to:

  • Provide you with a stimulating and supportive environment that is informed by research.
  • Offer a structured framework of study which ensures that within the timespan of the programme you follow a balanced and complementary range of modules in the two disciplines, whilst allowing sufficient choice to ensure that you are able to follow individual pathways of learning.
  • Enable you to develop (at least) familiarity with Ancient Greek or Latin language relevant to an understanding and appreciation of the literature, history and cultures of Greece and Rome.
  • Introduce you to a varied body of literary, cultural, political and philosophical works of Greece and Rome.
  • Promote your understanding of the historical and cultural contexts of Greek and Roman texts and your appreciation of the contribution of individual authors and texts to an understanding of the literary genres of Greek and Roman literature.
  • Foster your understanding of Greek and Roman cultures, with a focus on:
    • their literature and thought;
    • the issues involved in studying other cultures;
    • the similarities and differences between ancient cultures and our own.
  • In biblical studies, promote study of the text in depth in relation to contexts of interpretation, in the original languages where practicable.
  • In historical and systematic theology, offer the study of Christian theological thought, and particular periods in depth in relation to their contexts, using primary as well as secondary texts (generally in translation).
  • Provide a range of academic and personal skills which will prepare students from varied educational backgrounds for employment or further study, which will foster mental agility and adaptability, and which will enable you to deploy your knowledge, abilities and skills in their entirety, displaying balance and judgement in a variety of circumstances.
  • Incorporate a work experience placement into your degree programme.

4. Programme Structure

5. Programme Modules

http://intranet.exeter.ac.uk/humanities/studying/undergraduates/modules/

For further information on which level Classical Languages and Texts module you should take, please see our Classics Language Ladder and Studying Ancient Languages guide https://intranet.exeter.ac.uk/humanities/studying/subjecthandbooks/classics/ .

You are expected to balance your credits in each stage of the programme, taking 60 credits from Classical Studies, and 60 credits from Theology. You may take optional modules as long as any necessary prerequisites have been satisfied, where the timetable allows and if you have not already taken the module in question or an equivalent module.

You may take elective modules up to 30 credits outside of the programme in any stage of the programme as long as any necessary prerequisites have been satisfied, where the timetable allows and if you have not already taken the module in question or an equivalent module.

Stage 1


45 credits of compulsory modules, 75 credits of optional modules (including 30 credits of Classical Studies modules, and 45 credits of Theology and Religion modules)

The first year gives you a foundational knowledge of Classical Studies and Theology theory, concepts, and texts. You will also gain important analytical techniques that will be useful across a range of subjects and research tasks.

Subject to choosing 120 credits for the stage overall, you must:

a select either CLA1005 or CLA1006; the modules run in alternate years so you must select the one which is running in this academic year.

b select 30 credits of Classical Studies modules from this list.

c select 45 credits of Theology and Religion modules from this list.

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
CLA CLA1005-CLA1006 [See note a above]
CLA1005 Greek and Roman Narrative 30 No
CLA1006 Greek and Roman Drama 30 No
THE1110 The History of Early Christianities 15No
HAS1905 Employment Experience HASS 0No

Optional Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
CLA Y1 BA Classical Studies CH opt 2023-4 [See note b above]
CLA1202 Classical Language and Texts: Greek II 30 No
CLA1204 Classical Language and Texts: Greek III 30 No
CLA1252 Classical Language and Texts: Latin II 30 No
CLA1254 Classical Language and Texts: Latin III 30 No
CLA1517 Ancient Sources (Material Evidence): Hellenistic Palaces in West Asia 15 No
CLA1001 Greek History: Problems and Sources 30 No
CLA1025 Classical Language and Texts Greek I (A) 15 No
CLA1026 Classical Language and Texts: Greek I (B) 15 No
CLA1027 Classical Language and Texts: Latin I (A) 15 No
CLA1028 Classical Language and Texts: Latin I (B) 15 No
CLA1302 Ancient Sources (Written Evidence): Greek Historiography to the End of the Fifth Century BC 15 No
CLA1307 Ancient Sources (Written Evidence) Ancient Medicine 15 No
CLA1406 Text and Context: Roman Love Elegy 15 No
CLA1410 Text and Context: Writing Women in Ancient Literature 15 No
CLA1507 Ancient World: Greek Philosophy 15 No
CLA1514 Ancient Sources (Material Evidence) - Pompeii: Destruction, Discovery and Afterlife 15 No
THE Stage 1 CH Theology and Religion option modules 2023-4 [See note c above]
ARA1018 Introduction to Islam 15 No
ARA1038 Religious Minorities of the Middle East 15 No
THE1070 Elements of New Testament Greek 15 No
THE1076 Religion in the Modern World 15 No
THE1101 The Bible: Past and Present 15 No
THE1103 Introducing Christian Theologies 15 No
THE1106 Philosophy of Religion and Christian Ethics 15 No
THE1109 Introduction to the History and Literatures of the Bible 15 No
THE1110 The History of Early Christianities 15 No
THE2034 Intermediate New Testament Greek 15 No
THEM124 Elements of New Testament Greek 15 No
THEM126 Intermediate New Testament Greek 15 No

Stage 2


Compulsory Modules

30 credits of compulsory modules, 90 credits of optional modules (including 30 credits of Classical Studies modules, and 60 credits of Theology and Religion modules)

In the second year you will advance your grasp of classics knowledge, methods, and texts through a set of compulsory modules. Optional modules enable you to develop specialist knowledge on a range of topics.

Subject to choosing 120 credits for the stage overall, you must:

d select either CLA2005 or CLA2006; the modules run in alternate years so you must select the one which is running in this academic year.

e select 30 credits of Classical Studies modules from this list.

f select 60 credits of Theology and Religion modules from this list.

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
CLA CLA2005-CLA2006 [See note d above]
CLA2005 Greek and Roman Narrative 30 No
CLA2006 Greek and Roman Drama 30 No
HAS2905 Employment Experience HASS 0No

Optional Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
CLA S2 BA CH Classical Studies options 2023-4 [See note e above]
CLA2302 Ancient Sources (Written Evidence): Greek Historiography to the End of the Fifth Century BC 15 No
CLA2307 Ancient Sources (Written Evidence) Ancient Medicine 15 No
CLA2406 Text and Context: Roman Love Elegy 15 No
CLA2410 Text and Context: Writing Women in Ancient Literature 15 No
CLA2514 Ancient Sources (Material Evidence) - Pompeii: Destruction, Discovery and Afterlife 15 No
CLA2517 Ancient Sources (Material Evidence): Hellenistic Palaces in West Asia 15 No
CLA2202 Classical Language and Texts: Greek II 30 No
CLA2205 Classical Language and Texts: Greek IV 30 No
CLA2252 Classical Language and Texts: Latin II 30 No
CLA2254 Classical Language and Texts: Latin IV 30 No
CLA3204 Classical Language and Texts: Greek III 30 No
CLA3254 Classical Language and Texts: Latin III 30 No
CLA2507 Ancient World: Greek Philosophy 15 No
THE Stage 2 CH Theology and Religion option modules 2023-4 [See note f above]
THE2147 Early Christian Women: Eve, Mary, Thecla 30 No
THE2226 The Transformation of Modern Orthodox Christianity 30 No
THE2224 Modern Jewish History and Thought 30 No
THE2185 Incarnation: Topics in Philosophical Theology 30 No
THE2221 God, Food, and Alcohol in Israelite Cultures 30 No
THE2223 Introduction To Indian Philosophy (Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism) 30 No
THE2152 Evolution, God and Gaia 30 No
THE2173 Life and Death in Israel and Judah 30 No
THE2227 Military Ethics in Religious and Philosophical Perspectives 30 No
THE2225 Trans Studies in Christianity and Judaism 30 No
HUM HUM2000-HUM2001
HUM2000 Humanities in the Workplace 30 No
HUM2001 Humanities in the Workplace 15 No

Stage 3


120 credits of compulsory modules

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
HUM3997 Employment Experience Abroad 120Yes

Stage 4


30 credits of compulsory dissertation, 90 credits of optional modules (including 30-60 credits of Classical Studies modules, and 30-60 credits of Theology and Religion modules)

You will have the choice of a range of specialist modules, including the opportunity to take a dissertation module, to create a programme of work fully reflecting your interests and providing you with the opportunity to demonstrate what you have learned over the previous years of your degree.

g You must select either CLA3009 or THE3082 (you cannot take both modules). If you select CLA3009, you must take 60 credits of options from the Theology and Religion list. If you select THE3082, you must take 60 credits of options from the Classical Studies list.

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
CLA3009 Dissertation [See note g above]30No
THE3082 Theology Dissertation [See note g above]30No

Optional Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
CLA Final Stage BA Ancient History-Classical Studies CH options 2023-4
CLA3008 The Age of Cicero 30 No
CLA3033 Magic, Witchcraft and Ghosts in the Greek and Roman Worlds 30 No
CLA3045 Thucydides and the Idea of History 30 No
CLA3056 Ovid and the Erotic Passions 15 No
CLA3059 Classical Language and Texts: Greek V: Imperial Greek Prose 30 No
CLA3113 Art in Greek Society 15 No
CLA3123 Applied Classics 15 No
CLA3124 Receptions of the Classical Body 30 No
CLA3125 Reading and Writing Greek Literature in the Hellenistic World 30 No
CLA3202 Classical Language and Texts: Greek II 30 No
CLA3204 Classical Language and Texts: Greek III 30 No
CLA3205 Classical Language and Texts: Greek IV 30 No
CLA3206 Classical Language and Texts: Latin IV 30 No
CLA3251 Classical Language and Texts: Latin V: Epic 30 No
CLA3252 Classical Language and Texts: Latin II 30 No
CLA3254 Classical Language and Texts: Latin III 30 No
CLA3255 Greek Political Thought 15 No
CLA3257 Living in the Roman World: Society and Culture 30 No
CLA3263 Being and Not-Being in Greek Philosophy: from Parmenides to Aristotle 15 No
CLA3267 Dialogues with the Past: Creative Interpretative Project 15 No
CLA3274 The Persians in a Near Eastern Context 30 No
CLA3275 Women Writing Classics 15 No
CLA3277 Lost Works and Fragments 15 No
CLA3278 Roman Political Thought 15 No
CLA3279 Knowledge, Wealth and Power in the Ancient World 30 No
THE Final Stage CH Theology and Religion option modules 2023-4
THE3147 Early Christian women: Eve, Mary, Thecla 30 No
THE3225 Trans Studies in Christianity and Judaism 30 No
THE3227 Military Ethics in Religious and Philosophical Perspectives 30 No
THE3173 Life and Death in Israel and Judah 30 No
THE3152 Evolution, God and Gaia 30 No
THE3223 Introduction To Indian Philosophy (Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism) 30 No
THE3221 God, Food, and Alcohol in Israelite Cultures 30 No
THE3185 Incarnation: Topics in Philosophical Theology 30 No
THE3224 Modern Jewish History and Thought 30 No
THE3226 The Transformation of Modern Orthodox Christianity 30 No

6. Programme Outcomes Linked to Teaching, Learning and Assessment Methods

Intended Learning Outcomes
A: Specialised Subject Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of a range of major literary works of Greece and Rome.
2. Demonstrate knowledge of the biblical texts and their contexts of interpretation, of the history of Christian theological thought, and of particular periods in depth in relation to their contexts.
3. Read critically individual works within a specific genre.
4. Demonstrate an awareness of the way texts reflect changes in ancient society and perceptions.
5. Demonstrate an awareness of and critical engagement with aspects of Greek and Roman society, religion and philosophy and be able to evaluate the similarities and differences with our own culture.
6. Analyse in general terms the complex interrelationship between history, literature, philosophy and ideology in the context of one or more ancient societies.
7. Evaluate, analyse and synthesise a wide range of viewpoints on problems of interpretation and evaluation, and adopt a variety of critical approaches to the subject drawn from different disciplines within the subject area.
8. Demonstrate detailed and critical understanding of biblical texts, the contexts of their production and reception, and aspects of their ongoing interpretation.

ILOs 1-8 form the basis of the programme at all levels. However, more sophisticated analysis and understanding is expected in the final stage. These skills are developed in stages 1 and 2 by means of lectures, discussion in seminars, researching and writing essays, gobbet answers, text comment, and oral presentations. In the final stage these skills are developed in relation to particular topics and periods through specialised modules and through an optional dissertation. These skills are also reinforced in the final stage by placing greater emphasis on seminars; on oral presentations (often summatively assessed); and essay writing (longer essays are expected in the final stage). Tutorials are used to discuss essay topics, either individually or in small groups.

The assessment of ILOs 1-8 is made through a combination of examinations (including essays and gobbet or text passages for comment); essays and, in many final stage modules, the assessment of oral presentations.

Intended Learning Outcomes
B: Academic Discipline Core Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

9. Analyse critically individual texts and combine those analyses to demonstrate understanding of the development of literary genres.
10. Select and apply appropriate critical tools when reading primary and secondary literature and ancient literature in translation.
11. Demonstrate a professional approach to referencing and the use of bibliography.
12. Synthesise complex and diverse arguments and ideas lucidly and coherently, both orally and in writing.
13. Engage in creative analytical and evaluative thinking about texts, sources, arguments and interpretations.
14. Engage in lateral thinking, making connections between ideas and information in different fields of your study.
15. Gather, memorise, organise and deploy evidence, information and ideas, and show an awareness of the provisional nature of knowledge.
16. Reflect critically on the extent and limitations of your learning and understanding.
17. Research material and organise it into a coherent written form.
18. Represent your own view with clarity and cogency, and views other than your own with fairness and integrity.
19. Deliver orally a confident and well-structured presentation and defend it before an audience of your peers.

These skills are developed throughout the programme by means of lectures, discussion in seminars and study-groups, the preparation and delivery of oral presentations in seminars and the writing of essays. In the second and final stages you are expected to prepare longer and more sophisticated seminar presentations, and write longer essays in order further to develop these skills. Also in the final stage seminars are normally 2 hours in length and form the primary teaching and learning medium, with a focus on developing, in the context of their particular subjects, the more complex analytical skills listed opposite.

ILO 16 is developed through feedback on written work (normally delivered one-to-one, as well as in written form in the final stage).

The assessment of ILOs 9-19 is made through a combination of examinations (including essays and gobbet or text passages for comment); essays and, in many final stage modules, the assessment of oral presentations.

Intended Learning Outcomes
C: Personal/Transferable/Employment Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

20. Present an argument orally in a clear, organised and effective manner.
21. Present an argument in a written form in a clear and organised manner, with appropriate use of correct English.
22. Work creatively, flexibly and adaptably with others, both peers and academic staff.
23. Demonstrate autonomy, manifested in self-direction and intellectual initiative, both in learning and study and in the management of time.
24. Participate effectively in oral discussions.
25. Write and think under pressure and meet deadlines.
26. Use a range of basic IT resources to acquire and manipulate general and subject-specific information.
27. Use IT to create clearly-presented written assignments and handouts.
28. Identify, gather and discuss primary data and source material in textual studies.
29. Attend to, reproduce accurately and reflect on the ideas and arguments of others.
30. Engage with empathy and integrity with the convictions and behaviours of others, and be self-critical about your own convictions.
31. Organise and undertake suitable employment placements outside the UK and critically reflect upon the experience.

ILOs 20, 24-25, and 29-30 are developed through the preparation and delivery of oral presentations in most modules at all levels, and through the oral discussion of challenging material in all modules in the programme, in both seminars and tutorials.

ILO 22 is developed through participation in study groups with other students in most modules in the programme. It is also developed through meetings with personal tutors, one-to-one tutorials giving feedback on written work and through discussion in seminars.

ILOs 21, 25 and 29 are developed through examinations at all levels and through written assignments at all levels.

ILO 23 is an essential part of the successful completion of the programme but is encouraged through preparation for written and oral assignments, general preparation for seminars and language classes and through the stage 1 reflective learning notebook. It may be further developed through the optional dissertation module.

ILOs 26-27 are developed through compulsory oral presentations supported by hand-outs and through the requirement that all written work is word-processed.

ILO 28 is developed through researching essays, seminar presentations, and the dissertation (if chosen).

ILOs 20, 22, 24-25, 27, and 29-30 are assessed through the summative assessment of seminar presentations.

ILOs 21, 25, and 29-30 are assessed through examinations and written work at all levels and in all modules.

ILO 26 is assessed through the successful completion of the ELE assignments.

ILOs 27-28 are assessed primarily through written coursework.

ILO 31 is specifically related to the employment experience module.

7. Programme Regulations

Programme-specific Progression Rules

To progress to Stage 2 you must also achieve an average mark of at least 50% in Stage 1, otherwise you will be required to transfer to the relevant three-year programme. This is to ensure that only those students who are likely to succeed in their Year Abroad are selected.

HUM3997 Employment Experience Abroad counts as a single 120-credit module and is not condonable; you must pass this module to graduate with the degree title of BA Classical Studies and Theology with Employment Experience Abroad. If you fail the Employment Experience Abroad your degree title will be commuted to BA Classical Studies and Theology.

Classification

8. College Support for Students and Students' Learning

The marking criteria, which closely reflect the skills outlined in the Programme Outcomes section, and the Department’s expectations with regard to study groups, are available in the Student Handbook, which can be found at: www.intranet.exeter.ac.uk/humanities/studying/taughthandbook/.

In addition to the centrally provided services detailed in section 9, the Department of Classics and Ancient History provides:

  • Team Skills Development Programme
  • Student Handbooks and module guides (available in print and on the department websites)
  • ELE based learning support materials and activities (Hercules)
  • Access to teaching staff – times when staff are available are posted on office doors and contact email addresses provided in student handbooks
  • Student representation at department meetings and College Teaching Committee
  • Student progress review and reporting via reserved agenda items at department meetings

The College complies with the Code of Practice on Study and Work Experience Abroad. The name of the member of staff acting as the programme’s co-ordinator for study abroad is made known to you before you leave Exeter, and this person is responsible for liaison and oversight of your progress during the year abroad. Contact will be maintained with you during your year abroad by regular email communication.

9. University Support for Students and Students' Learning

10. Admissions Criteria

11. Regulation of Assessment and Academic Standards

12. Indicators of Quality and Standards

The programme is not subject to accreditation and/ or review by professional and statutory regulatory bodies (PSRBs).

13. Methods for Evaluating and Improving Quality and Standards

14. Awarding Institution

University of Exeter

15. Lead College / Teaching Institution

Faculty of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences (HASS)

16. Partner College / Institution

Partner College(s)

Not applicable to this programme

Partner Institution

Not applicable to this programme.

17. Programme Accredited / Validated by

0

18. Final Award

BA (Hons) Classical Studies and Theology with Employment Experience Abroad

19. UCAS Code

QV89

20. NQF Level of Final Award

6 (Honours)

21. Credit

CATS credits

480

ECTS credits

240

22. QAA Subject Benchmarking Group

[Honours] Classics and ancient history (including Byzantine Studies and Modern Greek)
[Honours] Theology and religious studies

23. Dates

Origin Date

22/08/2017

Date of last revision

27/03/2023