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Study information

Programme Specification for the 2023/4 academic year

BA (Hons) Ancient History and Archaeology with Study Abroad

1. Programme Details

Programme nameBA (Hons) Ancient History and Archaeology with Study Abroad Programme codeUFA4CTHGOA01
Study mode(s)Full Time
Part Time
Academic year2023/4
Campus(es)Streatham (Exeter)
NQF Level of the Final Award6 (Honours)

2. Description of the Programme

The Ancient History and Archaeology programme combines two distinct but overlapping disciplines which use a range of different techniques and sources to examine the past.

You will learn about the main issues in Greek and Roman history, society and political life and explore the ways in which Greeks and Romans thought about their own past. You will also be encouraged to consider the problems encountered by modern scholars seeking to access ancient history. Topics include the rise and fall of the Roman Empire, tyranny in the ancient world, the building of ancient civilisations, the portrayal of Roman emperors, and Greek poetry.

The Archaeology modules will introduce you to the techniques archaeologists use to investigate the past as well as time periods spanning from early prehistory to the Middle Ages. You will be able to choose from a wide range of optional modules covering topics such as the impact of Roman civilisation on native European cultures, Bronze Age Britain or the study of artefacts and human remains.

In Ancient History, students choose from historical modules based on written and material evidence and methodological modules. All level 3 students have a choice of a wide range of modules, which emphasise the critical interpretation and evaluation of appropriate source materials.

Archaeology will enable you to explore both the academic and practical dimensions of a uniquely fascinating discipline. Building on a firm foundation of the subject provided in the first year, the degree will give you a wide variety of choice to follow your particular interests. These can cover the microscopic analysis of ancient artefacts to the exploration of entire fossilised landscapes, from understanding prehistoric villages to recording historic buildings; the subject is broad, multi-disciplinary and dynamic.

Advice and guidance on your programme can be sought from your personal tutor and programme director. All staff offer regular office hours that you can drop into without a prior appointment for this purpose. Exeter's Archaeology degrees enable you to explore both the academic and practical dimensions of a uniquely fascinating discipline. Building on a firm foundation of the subject provided in the first year, the degrees give you a wide variety of choice to follow your particular interests. These can cover the microscopic analysis of ancient artefacts to the exploration of entire fossilised landscapes, from understanding prehistoric villages to recording historic buildings; the subject is broad, multi-disciplinary and dynamic. As you work through your degree, you can develop your own specialisation, culminating in a dissertation supported by one-to-one tuition.

This programme is studied over four years. The first two years and the final year are university-based, and the third year is spent at a university abroad on an approved programme of study.

Advice and guidance on your programme can be sought from your personal tutor and programme director. All staff offer regular office hours that you can drop into without a prior appointment for this purpose.

3. Educational Aims of the Programme

In Ancient History, you will choose from historical modules based on written and material evidence and methodological modules. All level 3 students have a choice of a wide range of modules, which emphasise the critical interpretation and evaluation of appropriate source materials.

Archaeology will enable you to explore both the academic and practical dimensions of a uniquely fascinating discipline. Building on a firm foundation of the subject provided in the first year, the degree will give you a wide variety of choice to follow your particular interests. These can cover the microscopic analysis of ancient artefacts to the exploration of entire fossilised landscapes, from understanding prehistoric villages to recording historic buildings; the subject is broad, multi-disciplinary and dynamic.

As you work through your degree, you can develop your own specialisation, culminating in a dissertation supported by one-to-one tuition.

The programme provides an intellectually stimulating, satisfying experience of learning and studying, and forms a sound basis for further study in Ancient History, Archaeology or related disciplines. It aims to develop a range of subject-specific, academic and transferable skills, including high order conceptual literacy and communication skills of value in graduate employment. History and Archaeology, like other programmes offered within the College of Humanities, encourages you to become a global citizen, a productive, useful and questioning member of society, and provides thorough training for further study or a specialist career. You may utilise the skills you develop in a range of sectors, including consultancy, market research, the civil service, education, teaching, new media industries, journalism and publishing, research, charities, information science, advertising and public relations.

The programme is intended to:

  • To offer an excellent Honours-level education in Archaeology and Ancient History, which meets the criteria for Honours level awards as set out in the FHEQ and the Universitys statement of Levels and Awards, and which at least meets the standards set in the national Subject Benchmarking statements for both subject areas.
  • To encourage graduates to become useful, productive and questioning members of society.
  • To provide a stimulating and supportive environment for students that is informed by research where deemed appropriate.
  • To produce graduates who are grounded in the main themes of Archaeology and Ancient History through a combination of both broad and detailed focuses on particular aspects of the past, study of a range of time periods, and study of different geographical areas
  • To offer a structured framework of study which ensures that within the timespan of the programme every student follows a balanced and complementary range of modules, whilst allowing sufficient choice to ensure that students are able to follow individual pathways of learning
  • To produce graduates who understand the various methods which Archaeologists and Ancient Historians use to study the past; and who can analyse the development of past societies and can gain competence in dealing with the various types of evidence and the methodological problems associated with studying historical cultures.
  • To develop students competence in the subject-specific skills required in Archaeology through practical engagement with primary data.
  • To expose students to different teaching and assessment methods within an appropriate learning environment, supported by feedback, monitoring and pastoral care.
  • To provide a range of academic and personal skills which will prepare students from varied educational backgrounds for employment or further study, which will foster mental agility and adaptability, and which will enable them to deploy their knowledge, abilities and skills in their entirety, displaying balance and judgement in a variety of circumstances. 

4. Programme Structure

5. Programme Modules

The following tables describe the programme and constituent modules. Constituent modules may be updated, deleted or replaced as a consequence of the annual programme review of this programme.

http://intranet.exeter.ac.uk/humanities/studying/undergraduates/modules/ 

You may take optional modules as long as any necessary prerequisites have been satisfied, where the timetable allows and if you have not already taken the module in question or an equivalent module. 

You may take elective modules up to 30 credits outside of the programme in any stage of the programme as long as any necessary prerequisites have been satisfied, where the timetable allows and if you have not already taken the module in question or an equivalent module.

Stage 1


30 credits of compulsory Archaeology modules, 30 credits of compulsory Ancient History modules, 30 credits of optional Archaeology modules, 30 credits of optional Ancient History modules

Subject to choosing 120 credits for the stage overall, you must:

select either CLA1001 or CLA1002; the modules run in alternate years so you must select the one which is running in this academic year.

select 30 credits of Archaeology modules from this list.

select 30 credits of Ancient History modules from this list.

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
ARC1010 Themes in World Archaeology 15No
ARC1020 Essential Archaeological Methods 15No
CLA CLA1001-CLA1002 [See note a above]
CLA1001 Greek History: Problems and Sources 30 No
CLA1002 Roman History: Problems and Sources 30 No

Optional Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
ARC BA Ancient History and Archaeology S1 Optional modules 2023-4 [See note b above]
ARA1030 Introduction to Islamic Archaeology 15 No
ARC1007 Archaeological and Forensic Science Practicals 15 No
ARC1008 Forensic Archaeology 15 No
ARC1030 Investigating British Archaeology 15 No
ARC1040 Artefacts and Materials 15 No
ARC1050 Objects: Contexts and Display 15 No
ARC1070 Practical Skills in Archaeology 30 No
CLA S1 BA AH CH opt 2023-4 [See note c above]
CLA1202 Classical Language and Texts: Greek II 30 No
CLA1204 Classical Language and Texts: Greek III 30 No
CLA1252 Classical Language and Texts: Latin II 30 No
CLA1254 Classical Language and Texts: Latin III 30 No
CLA1517 Ancient Sources (Material Evidence): Hellenistic Palaces in West Asia 15 No
CLA1006 Greek and Roman Drama 30 No
CLA1025 Classical Language and Texts Greek I (A) 15 No
CLA1026 Classical Language and Texts: Greek I (B) 15 No
CLA1027 Classical Language and Texts: Latin I (A) 15 No
CLA1028 Classical Language and Texts: Latin I (B) 15 No
CLA1302 Ancient Sources (Written Evidence): Greek Historiography to the End of the Fifth Century BC 15 No
CLA1307 Ancient Sources (Written Evidence) Ancient Medicine 15 No
CLA1406 Text and Context: Roman Love Elegy 15 No
CLA1410 Text and Context: Writing Women in Ancient Literature 15 No
CLA1507 Ancient World: Greek Philosophy 15 No
CLA1514 Ancient Sources (Material Evidence) - Pompeii: Destruction, Discovery and Afterlife 15 No

Stage 2


60 credits of compulsory modules, 30 credits of optional modules in Archaeology and 30 credits of optional modules in Ancient History (including HUM2000 and HUM2001 Humanities in the Workplace).

Subject to choosing 120 credits for the stage overall, you must:

You must take either ARC2003 or ARC2004 (you cannot choose both).

select either CLA2001 or CLA2002; the modules run in alternate years so you must select the one which is running in this academic year.

select 30 credits of Archaeology modules from this list.

select 30 credits of Ancient History modules from this list.

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
ARC ARC2003-ARC2004 [See onte d above]
ARC2003 Archaeological Fieldwork Project 30 No
ARC2004 Archaeological Fieldschool 30 No
CLA CLA2001-CLA2002 [See note e above]
CLA2001 Greek History: Problems and Sources 30 No
CLA2002 Roman History: Problems and Sources 30 No

Optional Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
ARC S2 BA SH and CH opt 2023-4 [See note f above]
ARC2003 Archaeological Fieldwork Project 30 No
ARA2014 Regions and Empires in Islamic Archaeology 15 No
ARC2004 Archaeological Fieldschool 30 No
ARC2012 Monumental Changes: Neolithic and Early Bronze Age Britain and Ireland 15 No
ARC2120 Things and Us: Ancient and Contemporary Material Culture 15 No
ARC2121 Brooches, Beads, Swords and Shields: Early Medieval Material Culture 15 No
ARC2123 Sustainability and Collapse in Past Societies 15 No
ARC2130 Discovering the Past with Molecular Science 15 No
ARC2401 Understanding the Landscape of Medieval Britain 15 No
ARC2406 Medieval Castles in Context 15 No
ARC2408 Romanisation: Interaction, Conquest and Change in Late Iron Age and Roman Dacia 15 No
ARC2504 Zooarchaeology 15 No
ARC2514 Forensic Anthropology 15 No
ARC2516 Human Origins and Evolution: the Lower and Middle Palaeolithic 15 No
CLA2514 Ancient Sources (Material Evidence) - Pompeii: Destruction, Discovery and Afterlife 15 No
CLA2517 Ancient Sources (Material Evidence): Hellenistic Palaces in West Asia 15 No
HIH2002 Uses of the Past 30 No
HIH2208A Medieval Paris 30 No
HIH2234 Sailors, Slavery and Piracy: The Atlantic World, 1600 - 1800 30 No
HIH2592 Science, Empire, and Natural History Museums: A Global Perspective 30 No
CLA S2 BA AH CH opt 2023-4 [See note g above]
CLA2202 Classical Language and Texts: Greek II 30 No
CLA3204 Classical Language and Texts: Greek III 30 No
CLA2205 Classical Language and Texts: Greek IV 30 No
CLA2252 Classical Language and Texts: Latin II 30 No
CLA3254 Classical Language and Texts: Latin III 30 No
CLA2254 Classical Language and Texts: Latin IV 30 No
CLA2006 Greek and Roman Drama 30 No
CLA2302 Ancient Sources (Written Evidence): Greek Historiography to the End of the Fifth Century BC 15 No
CLA2307 Ancient Sources (Written Evidence) Ancient Medicine 15 No
CLA2514 Ancient Sources (Material Evidence) - Pompeii: Destruction, Discovery and Afterlife 15 No
CLA2517 Ancient Sources (Material Evidence): Hellenistic Palaces in West Asia 15 No
CLA2507 Ancient World: Greek Philosophy 15 No
CLA2406 Text and Context: Roman Love Elegy 15 No
CLA2410 Text and Context: Writing Women in Ancient Literature 15 No
HUM HUM2000-HUM2001
HUM2000 Humanities in the Workplace 30 No
HUM2001 Humanities in the Workplace 15 No
HUM HUM2004-HUM2005
HUM2004 Making a Career in Publishing 15 No
HUM2005 Tales of Freedom, Necessity and Providence 15 No

Stage 3


120 credits of compulsory modules

For your year abroad you will agree a suite of modules in your host institution with the College Study Abroad Coordinator. Details of individual modules that may be taken whilst abroad can be found by accessing the partner institution’s factfile at http://www.exeter.ac.uk/international/abroad/where/ and navigating to the “Course Requirements” section of that factfile where a link to the modules on offer in the partner institution is displayed.

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
HUM3999 Year Abroad 120No

Stage 4


30 credits of compulsory modules, 30-60 credits of optional modules in Archaeology, 30-60 credits of optional modules in Ancient History (depending on the dissertation chosen)

Subject to choosing 120 credits for the stage overall, you must:

You must select either ARC3000 or CLA3009 (you cannot take both modules).

I  If you select CLA3009, you must take 60 credits of options from the Archaeology list.

If you select ARC3000 must take 60 credits of options from the Ancient History list.

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
CLA CH Dissertation CLA3009 or ARC3000 [See note h above]
ARC3000 Archaeological Dissertation 30 No
CLA3009 Dissertation 30 No

Optional Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
ARC SF BA SH and CH opt 2023-4 [See note i above]
ARC3003 Professional Placement 30 No
ARC3006 Advanced Fieldwork Project 15 No
ARC3011 Practicing Archaeological Science 15 No
ARC3012 Monumental changes: Neolithic and Early Bronze Age Britain and Ireland 15 No
ARC3120 Things and Us: Ancient and Contemporary Material Culture 15 No
ARC3121 Brooches, Beads, Swords and Shields: Early Medieval Material Culture 15 No
ARC3123 Sustainability and Collapse in Past Societies 15 No
ARC3401 Understanding the Landscape of Medieval Britain 15 No
ARC3406 Medieval Castles in Context 15 No
ARC3510 Experimental Approaches to Forensic and Archaeological Investigations 15 No
ARC3516 Human Origins and Evolution: the Lower and Middle Palaeolithic 15 No
ARC3611 Funerary Osteoarchaeology 15 No
ARC3408 Romanisation: Interaction, Conquest and Change in Late Iron Age and Roman Dacia 15 No
ARC3133 Digital Pasts 15 No
CLA Final Stage BA Ancient History-Classical Studies CH options 2023-4 [See note j above]
CLA3008 The Age of Cicero 30 No
CLA3033 Magic, Witchcraft and Ghosts in the Greek and Roman Worlds 30 No
CLA3045 Thucydides and the Idea of History 30 No
CLA3056 Ovid and the Erotic Passions 15 No
CLA3059 Classical Language and Texts: Greek V: Imperial Greek Prose 30 No
CLA3113 Art in Greek Society 15 No
CLA3123 Applied Classics 15 No
CLA3124 Receptions of the Classical Body 30 No
CLA3125 Reading and Writing Greek Literature in the Hellenistic World 30 No
CLA3202 Classical Language and Texts: Greek II 30 No
CLA3204 Classical Language and Texts: Greek III 30 No
CLA3205 Classical Language and Texts: Greek IV 30 No
CLA3206 Classical Language and Texts: Latin IV 30 No
CLA3251 Classical Language and Texts: Latin V: Epic 30 No
CLA3252 Classical Language and Texts: Latin II 30 No
CLA3254 Classical Language and Texts: Latin III 30 No
CLA3255 Greek Political Thought 15 No
CLA3257 Living in the Roman World: Society and Culture 30 No
CLA3263 Being and Not-Being in Greek Philosophy: from Parmenides to Aristotle 15 No
CLA3267 Dialogues with the Past: Creative Interpretative Project 15 No
CLA3274 The Persians in a Near Eastern Context 30 No
CLA3275 Women Writing Classics 15 No
CLA3277 Lost Works and Fragments 15 No
CLA3278 Roman Political Thought 15 No
CLA3279 Knowledge, Wealth and Power in the Ancient World 30 No
HUM HUM3000s
HUM3002 Aliens Abroad: Science Fiction in Global Literature 15 No
HUM3015 The Place of Meaning: Gardens in Britain and China 15 No
HUM3016 Book Publishing: Principles of Book Commissioning, Editing and Design 30 No
HUM3003A Hacking the Humanities: How to Plan and Run Successful Digital Projects 15 No
HUM3003 Hacking the Humanities: How to Plan and Run Successful Digital Projects 30 No
HUM3004 Transforming the Tablet: Digital Approaches to Ancient Text and Artefact 15 No

6. Programme Outcomes Linked to Teaching, Learning and Assessment Methods

Intended Learning Outcomes
A: Specialised Subject Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

1. Understand basic archaeological techniques and appreciate their major advantages and disadvantages.
2. Appreciate the relationship between data collected in the field and its interpretation.
3. Identify the different roles of professional archaeologists.
4. Understand the chronology of archaeological periods and the main themes in archaeology from early prehistory to the end of the Middle Ages.
5. Show familiarity with some key archaeological sites and finds.
6. Show competence in the various techniques of practical Archaeology and an understanding of their problems and possibilities
7. Use appropriate archaeological terminology.
8. Deploy information from technical projects.
9. Demonstrate understanding (at increasing depth, according to level) of thematic/methodological issues (increasingly complex, according to level).
10. ANCIENT HISTORY: Demonstrate an awareness of the main problems and issues bearing upon Greek and Roman history, and awareness of and critical engagement with aspects of Greek and Roman society, religion and philosophy; be able to analyse them critically and creatively and be able to evaluate the similarities and differences with our own culture (3.2 A1).
11. Demonstrate familiarity with the major Greek and Roman historians sufficient to be able to offer comment and reasoned analysis of their respective historiographical aims, methods, use of sources and their position within the historiographical tradition, and analyse in general terms the complex interrelationship between history, literature, philosophy and ideology in the context of one or more ancient societies (3.2 A2).
12. Evaluate, analyse and synthesise a wide range of sources appropriate to the subject area (3.2 A3).
13. Evaluate, analyse and synthesise a wide range of viewpoints on problems of interpretation and evaluation, and adopt a variety of critical approaches to the subject drawn from different disciplines within the subject area (3.2 A5).

1-3 are developed initially through first year modules, particularly ARC1020, and then through ARC2003/4, and in increasing sophistication through options during stages 2 and 3.

4 and 5 are introduced through first year modules, particularly ARC1010, and developed through thematic options at stages 2 and 3.

6-8 are introduced in ARC1020 and developed in ARC2003/4,and further enhanced through thematic options at stages 2 and 3.

9 is developed through the optional thematic modules taken across all three stages. The level of competence expected of students intensifies at each stage of the programme. Methodological issues area introduced through ARC1020 and developed through ARC2003/4. The chronological and thematic framework are introduced in ARC1010 and optional modules at stage 1 and developed through options at stages 2 and 3. ARC3000 at stage 3 brings the methodological and thematic elements together in an independent research dissertation. 1-3 are developed initially through first year modules, particularly ARC1020, and then through ARC2003/4, and in increasing sophistication through options during stages 2 and 3.

4 and 5 are introduced through first year modules, particularly ARC1010, and developed through thematic options at stages 2 and 3.

6-8 are introduced in ARC1020 and developed in ARC2003/4, and further enhanced through thematic options at stages 2 and 3.

9 is developed through the optional thematic modules taken across all three stages. The level of competence expected of students intensifies at each stage of the programme. Methodological issues area introduced through ARC1020 and developed through ARC2003/4. The chronological and thematic framework are introduced in ARC1010 and optional modules at stage 1 and developed through options at stages 2 and 3. ARC3000 at stage 3 brings the methodological and thematic elements together in an independent research dissertation.

10-13 are all developed in BIO2068.

11 is developed in detail in ARC1007, ARC1008, ARC2514 and ARC3611

These skills are all developed throughout the degree programme, but the emphasis becomes more complex as students move from stage to stage. They are developed through lectures and seminars, assessment of written work, and oral work (both presentation and class discussion).  

Intended Learning Outcomes
B: Academic Discipline Core Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

14. Draw thematic comparisons between material from different sources.
15. Show awareness of contrasting approaches to research.
16. Judge between competing views.
17. Understand the difference between qualitative and quantitative data.
18. Show clear awareness of the basic philosophical questions arising from academic research.
19. Think and write broadly about large themes.
20. Comprehend complex terminology and discourses.
21. Use a library, field visits and the world-wide web to find information.
22. Deploy critical argument, based on professional standards of evidence use.
23. Identify problems of reliability and bias in, and more generally evaluate, evidence.
24. Collate data from a range of sources.
25. Reference sources accurately in written work, including use of the Harvard system in Archaeology.
26. Answer questions concisely in writing.
27. Present work and answer questions orally.
28. Think of pertinent and intellectually demanding questions to ask other students.
29. Deploy complex terminology in a comprehensible manner.
30. Focus on and comprehend complex texts.
31. ANCIENT HISTORY: (Numbers in brackets refer to the Benchmarking Statement for Classics & Ancient History): Gather, memorize, organize and deploy evidence and information, and show an awareness of the consequences of the unavailability of evidence (3.5 17).
32. Select and apply appropriate methodologies when using primary and secondary historical materials (3.6 19).
33. Demonstrate a professional approach to referencing and the use of bibliography (3.7 25).
34. Synthesise complex and diverse arguments and ideas lucidly and coherently, both orally and in writing (3.6 22).
35. Engage in analytical and evaluative thinking about texts, sources, arguments and interpretations (3.6 20).
36. Engage in lateral thinking, making connections between ideas and information in different fields of their study (3.6 21).
37. Reflect critically on the extent, and limitations, of their learning and understanding (3.5 15).

These skills are developed throughout the degree programme but the emphasis becomes more complex as students move from stage to stage. They are developed through lectures and seminars, written work, and oral work (both presentation and class discussion).

In Archaeology these skills are developed through a mixture of teaching and learning methods including lectures (normally 2 hours), seminars, practical classes/fieldwork and tutorials.

For Ancient History, at Stage 3 seminars are normally 2 hours in length and form the primary teaching and learning medium, with a focus on developing, in the context of their particular subjects, the more complex analytical skills listed opposite.

For Ancient History, skill 24 is developed through feedback on written work (normally delivered one-to-one, as well as in written form at Stage 3). It is also developed through each student's personal development plan.

The assessment is made through a combination of examinations (including essays and gobbet passages for comment); term-time essays and oral presentations. The marking criteria are available in the College Student Handbook.

For Ancient History, skill 24 may be formatively assessed at Stage 1 by means of the compulsory learning notebook (which is part of the assessment for one optional module). 

Intended Learning Outcomes
C: Personal/Transferable/Employment Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

38. Undertake independent study and work to deadlines.
39. Use a word processor, and the world-wide web.
40. Digest, select and organise material from disparate sources for suitably illustrated, clear and concise written work of varying length.
41. Participate in oral discussions; present and evaluate complex arguments and ideas orally; digest, select and organise material for oral presentations.
42. Work with others as part of a team.
43. Interact effectively with peers and staff
44. Undertake group work, including the presentation and discussion of material in groups.
45. Plan and execute a demanding piece of work over a long time scale.
46. Be able to reflect on the challenges of living and learning in a different environment.
47. Present an argument orally in a clear, organised and effective manner (3.4 23 & 3.7 24).
48. Present an argument in a written form in a clear and organized manner, with appropriate use of correct English (3.4 24)
49. Work creatively, flexibly and adaptably with others, both peers and academic staff (3.6 22 and 3.7 25).
50. Demonstrate autonomy, manifested in self-direction and intellectual initiative, both in learning and study and in the management of time (3.5 14)
51. Participate effectively in oral discussions. (3.6 22)
52. Write and think under pressure and to meet deadlines.
53. Make critical and well-informed use of IT resources (such as e-mail and the World-Wide-Web) to acquire and manipulate general and subject-specific information (3.7 28).
54. Use relevant software and scanning technologies to create clearly presented written assignments and handouts (3.7 B15).
55. Advance linguistic competence independently.
56. Adapt to the culture and working practices of a foreign country.

38 is an essential part of the successful completion of the programme, notably the dissertation.

39 is developed through the requirement that all written work be word-processed, and through use of the internet as a general research tool in all modules. There is further scope for developing IT skills through optional modules.

40 is developed through a variety of written assignments and tutorials throughout the programme.

41 is developed through the self-assessment involved in completing cover sheets for all assignments.

42 is developed through group work and seminars, which form an important component of many option modules.

43 & 44 The skills in 6 and 7 are developed particularly through the archaeology fieldwork/fieldschool modules which involve working as part of a team.

45 is developed through many thematic and skills modules which include group work. 6, 7 and 8 are also developed through interaction in seminars and in discussion with tutors about essay work, and in response to critical review both collective and individual.

46 is developed through the Archaeology Fieldwork Project at stage 2 and dissertation work at stage 3 (both of which work towards an end-of-module deadline).

Ancient History:

(a) Skills 47, 51 and 52 are developed through the preparation and delivery of oral presentations in most modules at all levels, and through the oral discussion of challenging material in all modules in the programme.

(b) Skill 49 is developed through participation in study groups with other students in most modules in the programme. For expectations with regard to study groups see the College Taught Student Handbook (https://intranet.exeter.ac.uk/humanities/studying/taughthandbook/).
(c) Skill 49 is also developed through meetings with personal tutors, one-to-one tutorials giving feedback on written work and through discussion in seminars.
(d) Skills 48 and 52 are developed through examinations at all stages and levels and through written assignments at all stages (see also (a) above).
(e) Skill 50 is an essential part of the successful completion of the programme but is encouraged through preparation for written and oral assignments, general preparation for seminars and through student's individual annual personal development plans. Skill 50 may be further developed at Stage 3 through the optional dissertation module.

(f) Skills 51 and 52 are developed through compulsory oral presentations supported by handouts, each student's personal development plan and through the requirement that all written work should be word-processed. 38 is an essential part of the successful completion of the programme, notably the dissertation.
39 is developed through the requirement that all written work be word-processed, and through use of the internet as a general research tool in all modules. There is further scope for developing IT skills through optional modules.
40 is developed through a variety of written assignments and tutorials throughout the programme.
41 is developed through the self-assessment involved in completing cover sheets for all assignments.
42 is developed through group work and seminars, which form an important component of many option modules.
43 & 44 The skills in 43 and 44 are developed particularly through the archaeology fieldwork/fieldschool modules which involve working as part of a team.

45 is developed through many thematic and skills modules which include group work. 43, 44 and 45 are also developed through interaction in seminars and in discussion with tutors about essay work, and in response to critical review both collective and individual.
46 is developed through the Archaeology Fieldwork Project at stage 2 and dissertation work at stage 3 (both of which work towards an end-of-module deadline).

ILOs 55-56 are developed through the language tuition in stages 1 and 2 and in the year abroad.

Archaeology

The skills in 38, 39 and 40 are assessed in all modules through written assignments. 40 is covered by the fact that students prepare written assignments of differing lengths, ranging from 1,500 word essays through to the 9,000 word dissertation. Assessment of group oral presentations (42, 43, 45) occurs in a variety of modules.
.
Ancient History:

(a) Skills 47, 49, 51 and 52 are assessed through the summative assessment of oral presentations at level 3 (10% or 20%). This assessment may also include a formative peer evaluation element.

(b) Skills 48 and 52 are assessed through examinations and written work at all stages and in all modules. See marking criteria in the College Taught Student Handbook.

(c) Skill 53 is assessed through the successful completion of ELE assignments in tandem with the reflective learning notebook attached to one optional module.

(d) Skill 54 is assessed through the assessment of written course-work. See the College Student Handbook for details. The skills in 38, 39 and 40 are assessed in all modules. 40 is covered by the fact that students prepare written assignments of differing lengths,. Formative assessment of group oral presentations ( 42, 43, 45 ) occurs in a range of modules. 46 is covered by the dissertation and ARC2003/2004.

7. Programme Regulations

Programme-specific Progression Rules

To progress to Stage 2 you must achieve an average mark of at least 60% in Stage 1, otherwise you will be required to transfer to the three-year programme. This is to ensure that only those students who are likely to succeed in their Year Abroad are selected.

The Year Abroad counts as a single 120-credit module and is not condonable; you must pass this module to graduate with the degree title of BA Ancient History with Archaeology with Study Abroad. If you fail the Year Abroad module your degree title will be commuted to BA Ancient History with Archaeology. You will be assessed by your host university during your academic year abroad with their grades converted back to Exeter grades to contribute towards your degree classification. The rules governing failure and referral will be determined by the host institution.

Classification

Full details of assessment regulations for all taught programmes can be found in the TQA Manual, specifically in the Credit and Qualifications Framework, and the Assessment, Progression and Awarding: Taught Programmes Handbook. Additional information, including Generic Marking Criteria, can be found in the Learning and Teaching Support Handbook.

8. College Support for Students and Students' Learning

All students within Archaeology have a personal tutor for their entire programme of study, whom they meet at least three times a year, and who are available for at least two hours a week. Personal tutors also conduct a Personal Development Planning (PDP) interview in January when students discuss a pre-completed self-appraisal with their tutor, and agree an 'action plan' to consolidate and improve performance over the coming year.

Programme handbooks and other useful information can be accessed via the student intranet: http://intranet.exeter.ac.uk/humanities/studying/taughthandbook/.

Other useful information and student resources can be accessed via the Exeter Learning Environment (ELE): http://vle.exeter.ac.uk/login/index.php  which has specific information on library skills, essay writing and research skills.

9. University Support for Students and Students' Learning

Please refer to the University Academic Policy and Standards guidelines regarding support for students and students' learning.

10. Admissions Criteria

Undergraduate applicants must satisfy the Undergraduate Admissions Policy of the University of Exeter.

Postgraduate applicants must satisfy the Postgraduate Admissions Policy of the University of Exeter.

Specific requirements required to enrol on this programme are available at the respective Undergraduate or Postgraduate Study Site webpages.

11. Regulation of Assessment and Academic Standards

Each academic programme in the University is subject to an agreed College assessment and marking strategy, underpinned by institution-wide assessment procedures.

The security of assessment and academic standards is further supported through the appointment of External Examiners for each programme. External Examiners have access to draft papers, course work and examination scripts. They are required to attend the Board of Examiners and to provide an annual report. Annual External Examiner reports are monitored at both College and University level. Their responsibilities are described in the University's code of practice. See the University's TQA Manual for details.

(Quality Review Framework.

14. Awarding Institution

University of Exeter

15. Lead College / Teaching Institution

Faculty of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences (HASS)

16. Partner College / Institution

Partner College(s)

Not applicable to this programme

Partner Institution

Not applicable to this programme.

17. Programme Accredited / Validated by

0

18. Final Award

BA (Hons) Ancient History and Archaeology with Study Abroad

19. UCAS Code

VV1K

20. NQF Level of Final Award

6 (Honours)

21. Credit

CATS credits

480

ECTS credits

240

22. QAA Subject Benchmarking Group

[Honours] Classics and ancient history (including Byzantine Studies and Modern Greek)
[Honours] Archaeology

23. Dates

Origin Date

24/11/2008

Date of last revision

27/03/2023