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Study information

Programme Specification for the 2024/5 academic year

BA (Hons) Anthropology with Study Abroad

1. Programme Details

Programme nameBA (Hons) Anthropology with Study Abroad Programme codeUFA4HPSHPS40
Study mode(s)Full Time
Academic year2024/5
Campus(es)Streatham (Exeter)
NQF Level of the Final Award6 (Honours)

2. Description of the Programme

Studying Anthropology allows you to explore our globalised world. Anthropology offers a distinctive comparative outlook on human social and cultural life. The discipline has traditionally focused on the study of small-scale and pre-industrial societies and at Exeter you will have opportunities to learn about anthropological discoveries in this area. However, Anthropologists have increasingly applied their distinctive insights to modern living, and today are as interested in the practices of multinational companies and the impact of natural resource exploitation on local communities as in the rituals and ceremonies of indigenous peoples.

At Exeter, you will be introduced to a range of core topics in current anthropological discussion and debate and will also have the opportunity to take a variety of modules exploring topics such as human-animal interactions, global health, postcolonial politics, development, cultures of race and ethnicity, consumerism and the anthropology of music and sound.

Studying Anthropology will equip you with a full range of critical analytical perspectives as well as research methods to start your own exploration of the nature and complexity of human social life.

On this Study Abroad programme, you will spend your third year of study at a foreign university.

3. Educational Aims of the Programme

The aims of the Anthropology programme are to:

  • develop an awareness and understanding of the range of human cultural diversity;
  • encourage you to appreciate human cultural diversity from a variety of socio-cultural perspectives;
  • develop an appreciation of the dynamic character of anthropology and its constituent disciplines;
  • develop practical research skills alongside a critical awareness of various theoretical perspectives;
  • develop your ability to apply knowledge and understanding to the principles and methods of anthropology and to demonstrate comprehension of the problematic and varied nature of research involving human subjects;
  • introduce you to the core areas of socio-cultural anthropological theory and practice and provide an opportunity for reflection on current practice and developments in the field;
  • promote the practice of life-long learning and equip you with the ability to work autonomously;
  • allow you to acquire a range of transferable skills, appropriate for the workplace or postgraduate study, which might include project design, writing and presentation skills, basic IT skills, and the ability to analyse data and to evaluate and present reasoned arguments.

4. Programme Structure

The programme is studied over four years full-time. Study is undertaken in four stages, with each stage comprising 120 credits made up of either 15 or 30-credit modules, which contribute towards the degree. The credit rating of a module is proportional to the total workload and one credit is nominally equivalent to ten hours of work. The ‘level’ of a module (designated by the first number in the module code) indicates its position in the progressive development of academic abilities and/or practical skills

This degree programme contains compulsory and optional modules and as part of the degree programme students may take up to 30 credits a year in another discipline outside their main degree subject, after they have met the compulsory requirements of their main subject (specified below)

In Anthropology, students must study the specified core modules and the specified optional modules. The full list of modules currently offered for Anthropology (ANT) is available at

http://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/sociology/undergraduate/modules/

There are modules from other departments that are recognised as Anthropology options. A full list of those is available at the Unit’s ELE page: http://vle.exeter.ac.uk/course/view.php?id=3026 

In each year students will normally take modules worth 120 credits in Anthropology. Students may drop 30 credits from the programme with the exception of mandatory modules to take a maximum of 30 credits of modules that are not listed in the programme specification, including options in Anthropology, under the University’s modularity rule.

Modules and other study components can be taken only with the approval of the College (normally given by the student’s personal tutor); options are offered each year at the discretion of the Colleges and a module may be taken only if the necessary prerequisites have been satisfied, if the timetable allows, and if the module or an equivalent module has not been taken previously.

Assessment at stage one does not contribute to the summative classification of the award. The award will normally be based on the degree mark formed from the credit weighted average marks for stages 2, 3 and 4 weighted 4:2:8 respectively.

Students will spend the 3rd year of their studies in a partner University on an Erasmus/Socrates exchange or other approved programme of study. The year abroad comprises 120 credits and assessment is based on the credits gained at the partner institution abroad.

In exceptional circumstances you may exit this award with a Cert HE Anthropology where you have achieved 120 credits at Stage 1 or a Dip HE Anthropology where you have achieved 240 credits across Stages 1 and 2, with at least 90 of these from Stage 2.  

5. Programme Modules

The following tables describe the programme and constituent modules. Constituent modules may be updated, deleted or replaced. Details of the modules currently offered may be obtained from the Faculty web site:

https://www.exeter.ac.uk/study/studyinformation/modules/?prog=anthropology

You may take Option Modules as long as any necessary prerequisites have been satisfied, where the timetable allows and if you have not already taken the module in question or an equivalent module. Descriptions of the individual modules are given in full on the Faculty web site.

You may take Elective Modules up to 30 credits outside of the programme in each stage of the programme as long as any necessary prerequisites have been satisfied, where the timetable allows and if you have not already taken the module in question or an equivalent module.  

Stage 1


The first year gives you a foundational knowledge of anthropological theory and concepts, and how to think critically about the key challenges of studying diverse human societies. You will also be introduced to the fundamentals of the archaeological study of human society in the past, and gain important analytical techniques that will be useful across a range of subjects and research tasks.

90 credits of compulsory modules, 30 credits of optional modules.

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
ANT1000 Introduction to Social Anthropology 30No
ANT1013 Traditions of Anthropological Inquiry 30No
SPA1000 Imagining Social Worlds 30No

Optional Modules

View option modules here (ANT)

View option modules here (PHL)

View option modules here (SOC)

Please note that modules are subject to change and not all modules are available across all programmes, this is due to timetable, module size constraints and availability.

Stage 2


In the second year you will advance your grasp of anthropological knowledge and methods through a set of compulsory modules. You will learn about the current issues and problems that attract anthropologists’ attention, and acquire the research methods that anthropologists use in their studies; you will even develop your own small research project where you can put these skills to the test. Optional modules enable you to develop specialist knowledge on a range of topics.

60 credits of compulsory modules, 60 credits of optional modules.

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
ANT2000 Current Debates in Anthropology 30No
SPA2000 Knowing the Social World 30No

Optional Modules

View option modules here (ANT)

View option modules here (PHL)

View option modules here (SOC)

Please note that modules are subject to change and not all modules are available across all programmes, this is due to timetable, module size constraints and availability.

Stage 3


Students spend this stage in a partner University on an Erasmus/Socrates exchange or other approved programme of study.

The year abroad comprises 120 credits. Assessment is based on the credits gained at the partner institution abroad. 

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
HAS3999 Study Abroad (HASS) 120No

Stage 4


The centre-point of the final year is the dissertation. This provides you with the opportunity to explore an area of interest and to demonstrate what you have learned over the previous years of your degree. You will also take up to three other specialist modules to create a programme of work fully reflecting your interests.

Students will take a compulsory 30 credit Dissertation module and 90 credits of optional modules.

Compulsory Modules

 

 

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
ANT3040 Anthropology Dissertation 30No

Optional Modules

Sociology Anthropology and Philosophy

View option modules here (ANT)

View option modules here (PHL)

View option modules here (SOC)

Please note that modules are subject to change and not all modules are available across all programmes, this is due to timetable, module size constraints and availability.

 


6. Programme Outcomes Linked to Teaching, Learning and Assessment Methods

Intended Learning Outcomes
A: Specialised Subject Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

1. Demonstrate an understanding of social anthropology as the comparative study of human societies
2. how an appreciation of the importance of empirical fieldwork as the primary method of gathering data and is the basis for the generation of anthropological theory
3. Demonstrate a detailed knowledge of specific themes in social anthropology (including kinship, gender, sexuality, power, ethics , politics, economics, subsistence, environment, religion, globalisation, communication and representation) and the intellectual debates concerning them.
4. Display an understanding of how knowledge is contested, and that anthropology by its nature is dynamic, constantly generating new priorities and theories.
5. Show an informed awareness of and sensitivity to human diversity, an appreciation of its scope and complexity and recognition of the richness of experience and potential it provides.
6. Show an acquaintance with the theory and history of anthropology.
7. Display knowledge of the values, ethics and traditions of different cultures, including a detailed knowledge of particular areas of the world as a result of regionally focussed study.
8. Display a familiarity with a range of methods of representing data.
9. Show a reflexive awareness of ethical issues concerned with the study of social worlds and representation of others, of the nature of knowledge, and the role of the anthropologist or ethnographer in the collection and presentation of data.
10. Show an awareness of social and historical change, and knowledge of some paradigms and modes (including indigenous ones) for explaining it.
11. Show an appreciation of the interconnections between various aspects of social and cultural life, belief systems, global forces, individual behaviour and the physical environment.

These skills are developed throughout the degree programme, but the emphasis becomes more complex as you move from stage to stage. 1-11 are developed through lectures and seminars, written work, and oral work (both presentation and class discussion), among other methods

The assessment of these skills is through a combination of term-time essays, (ILOs 1-11) oral presentations, (ILOs 1-11) and examinations ILOs 1-11 (and, where applicable, Ethnographic Research Projects, Dissertation work and other forms of authentic assessments like portfolios of blog entries and research proposals: ILOs 1-11). The criteria of assessment pay full recognition to the importance of the various skills outlined.

We use diverse methods of assessment to support our emphasis on presentation, teamwork and projects/dissertations, as well as essay writing and exams. The ratio of assessment by coursework to assessment by exam varies according to which modules you take, but on average is about 50:50. Most of our modules emphasize continuous and authentic forms of assessment over traditional timed exams. You must pass your first year assessment in order to progress to the second year, but the results do not count towards your degree classification. For three-year programmes, the assessments in the second and third years contribute to your final degree classification. For four-year programmes the assessments in the second, third and fourth years all contribute to your final degree classification.

Intended Learning Outcomes
B: Academic Discipline Core Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

12. Understand how human beings are shaped by and interact with their social, cultural and physical environments.
13. Provide ethnographic description and analysis.
14. Interpret a range of texts within historical, social and theoretical contexts
15. Apply anthropological knowledge to a variety of practical situations, personal and professional
16. Plan, undertake and present scholarly work that demonstrates an understanding of anthropological aims, methods and theoretical considerations.
18. Collate data from a range of sources
19. Produce accurate reference to sources in written work.
20. Answer questions concisely and persuasively in written work.
21. Present work and answer questions orally.
22. Deploy complex terminology in a comprehensible manner
23. Analyse texts, visual material and other artefacts taking into account their cultural, historical and generic contexts
24. Demonstrate a critical appreciation of ideas of cultural difference and cross-cultural variation as well as the specificity of one’s own cultural perspective

These skills are developed throughout the degree programme, but the emphasis becomes more complex as you move from stage to stage. 12-16 are developed through lectures and seminars, written work, and oral work (both presentation and class discussion), among other methods

Skills are assessed through formatively and summatively assessed seminar presentations (ILOs 12-16), written work at all levels (ILOs 12-16) and in some modules, ethnographic research projects, other forms of “authentic assessment” and the dissertation (ILOs 12-16).

Intended Learning Outcomes
C: Personal/Transferable/Employment Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

17. Demonstrate independence of thought and analytical, critical and synoptic skills
18. Demonstrate communication and presentation skills (using oral and written materials and information technology).
19. Display scholarly skills, such as an ability to make a structured argument, reference the works of others, and assess different forms of evidence.
20. Show time planning and management skills.
30. Participate in oral discussions; present and evaluate complex arguments and ideas orally; digest, select and organise material for oral presentations.
31. Work with others as part of a team on challenging material.
32. Interact effectively with peers and staff.
33. Communicate and argue effectively, both orally and in writing.
34. Undertake group work, including the presentation and discussion of material in groups.
35. Express and defend opinions on a wide range of current and abstract issues.
36. Plan the execution of demanding work over a very long time scale

These skills are developed throughout the degree programme, but the emphasis becomes more complex as you move from stage to stage. 12-16 are developed through lectures and seminars, written work, and oral work (both presentation and class discussion), among other methods.

Skills are assessed through formatively and summatively assessed seminar presentations (ILOs 17-20), written work at all levels (ILOs 17-20) and in some modules, ethnographic researchprojects, other forms of “authentic assessment” and the dissertation (ILOs 17-20).

7. Programme Regulations

Classification

8. College Support for Students and Students' Learning

9. University Support for Students and Students' Learning

10. Admissions Criteria

11. Regulation of Assessment and Academic Standards

12. Indicators of Quality and Standards

The programme is not subject to accreditation and/ or review by professional and statutory regulatory bodies (PSRBs).

13. Methods for Evaluating and Improving Quality and Standards

14. Awarding Institution

University of Exeter

15. Lead College / Teaching Institution

Faculty of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences (HASS)

16. Partner College / Institution

Partner College(s)

Not applicable to this programme

Partner Institution

Not applicable to this programme.

17. Programme Accredited / Validated by

0

18. Final Award

BA (Hons) Anthropology with Study Abroad

19. UCAS Code

L603

20. NQF Level of Final Award

6 (Honours)

21. Credit

CATS credits ECTS credits

22. QAA Subject Benchmarking Group

[Honours] Anthropology

23. Dates

Origin Date

01/05/2012

Date of last revision

18/07/2013