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Study information

Programme Specification for the 2023/4 academic year

BA (Hons) Political and Philosophical Studies WEEA

1. Programme Details

Programme nameBA (Hons) Political and Philosophical Studies WEEA Programme codeUFA4HPSHPS89
Study mode(s)Full Time
Academic year2023/4
Campus(es)Streatham (Exeter)
NQF Level of the Final Award6 (Honours)

2. Description of the Programme

This programme is a variant for BA Politics, Philosophy and Economics for those requiring to exit from the parent programme

 

Political and Philosophical Studies enables students to study an inter-disciplinary programme of the social sciences and humanities across two distinctive disciplines at Exeter. You will study how government is constituted, how being and truth are deliberated and how goods, services and peoples are organised. You will explore the philosophical and political foundations of order and justice. You will examine the various forms of democracy through history. You will interrogate the questions of human society including war and peace, resource scarcity and distribution, the natural environment, faith and reason. You will take modules of study that introduce them to these big questions under the guidance of leading scholars in their fields. By your third-year you will focus on the specific manifestations of these questions in modules on certain regions and themes of politics, as well as on certain texts, issues and thinkers of philosophy.


In your third year you will undertake a work-placement abroad* and gain skills that equip you to work in the global employment market and to improve your knowledge of foreign cultures. You are encouraged to think about the intercultural competence and the employability skills that you acquire during their year abroad.

 

You will need to have gained an overall average mark for the year of 50% or above at Level 1 in order to participate in the work abroad element of the programme.

 

By your final year you will focus on the specific manifestations of these questions in modules on certain regions and themes of politics, on certain texts, issues and thinkers of philosophy, and on certain aspects and dimensions of the economy. You can also undertake a dissertation in one of the two disciplines.

 

*Please note that you will be required to identify and secure yourself a work placement or placements to undertake in your third year of study. You will need to have found this placement by the end of your second year of study.

When you do a work placement there are various costs that you need to consider.  Not all of them will apply to every placement, but you should be aware of them and work out roughly what it will cost you before you begin:

  • Travel to and from work
  • Accommodation, if the placement is too far away from your address to travel to on a daily basis
  • Food
  • Additionally, for international placements:
  • Insurance
  • Flights/train/coach
  • Visas
  • Some placement providers will be able to help you to cover some of these costs, and you should ask before starting if this is the case
  • We strongly encourage you to take a paid work abroad year.

3. Educational Aims of the Programme

  • To provide you with an excellent education across disciplines of politics and philosophy from core to specialist, in a supportive and responsive learning environment that is enriched by research. 
  • To enable you to understand and use the main concepts, approaches and theories of these disciplines; to analyse, interpret and evaluate philosophical ideas and political behaviour, events and institutions; and to relate the academic study of politics and philosophy to questions of public concern. 
  • To develop your competence in discipline-specific, core academic and personal and key skills. 
  • To offer you a wide range of choice, insofar as this choice is consistent with the coherence and intellectual rigour of the degree. 
  • To equip you to be a questioning and productive member of society.

 

4. Programme Structure

Your Political, Philosophical Studies with Employment Experience Abroad programme is a 4 year programme of study at Regulated Qualifications Framework (RQF) level 6 (as confirmed against the FHEQ). This programme is divided into 4 ‘Stages’, but as an exit award, at least one stage will be from your original parent programme. Each Stage is normally equivalent to an academic year.  The programme is also divided into units of study called ‘modules’ which are assigned a number of ‘credits’. The credit rating of a module is proportional to the total workload, with 1 credit being nominally equivalent to 10 hours of work.

 

Placement should be a minimum 28 weeks (7 months) between September and June.

 

5. Programme Modules

The following tables describe the programme and constituent modules. Constituent modules may be updated, deleted or replaced as a consequence of the annual programme review of this programme.

Your Political, Philosophical Studies with Employment Experience Abroad programme is a 4 year programme of study at Regulated Qualifications Framework (RQF) level 6 (as confirmed against the FHEQ). This programme is divided into 4 ‘Stages’, but as an exit award, at least one stage will be from your original parent programme. Each Stage is normally equivalent to an academic year.  The programme is also divided into units of study called ‘modules’ which are assigned a number of ‘credits’. The credit rating of a module is proportional to the total workload, with 1 credit being nominally equivalent to 10 hours of work.

Placement should be a minimum 28 weeks (7 months) between September and June.

The following tables describe the programme and constituent modules. Constituent modules may be updated, deleted or replaced as a consequence of the annual review of this programme. Details of the modules currently offered may be obtained from the Faculty website:

 

Politics Modules

https://politics.exeter.ac.uk/students/ugmodules_exeter/

 

Philosophy Modules

https://sociology.exeter.ac.uk/current/undergraduatemodules/2023-24/philosophy/

 

You may take optional modules as long as any necessary prerequisites have been satisfied, where the timetable allows and if you have not already taken the module in question or an equivalent module.

You may take elective modules up to 30 credits outside of the programme in stage 2 and the final year of the programme, as long as any necessary prerequisites have been satisfied, where the timetable allows and if you have not already taken the module in question or an equivalent module.

 

Stage 1


Stage 1: 105 credits of compulsory modules, 15 credits of optional modules

 

As per the parent programme of BA Politics, Philosophy, and Economics, however any non-condonable fails can now be condoned.

Stage 2


Stage 2:  75 credits of compulsory modules, 45 credits of optional modules

Compulsory Politics modules

Students must take both of the following Compulsory Politics (POL) modules.

 

Compulsory Philosophy modules

Students must choose at least 30 credits of the following Compulsory Philosophy (PHL) modules.

 

Optional Modules

Please note, students must ensure you take a minimum of 120 credits in both Politics and Philosophy across Stages 2 and 4, including a minimum of 30 in both at Stage 4.

 

 

 

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
POL2046 The Economics of Politics 15No
POL2050 Political Philosophy 15No
PHL2010A Philosophy of Mind 1 15No
PHL2011A The Philosophy of Nature 1 15No
PHL2015 Body and Mind 15No
PHL2016 Metaphysics 15No
PHL2018 Philosophy of Language 15No
PHL2118 Moral agency in social context 15No

Optional Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
BA Political and Philosophical Studies Optional Modules Stage 2
POL2020 Contemporary Theories of World Politics 15 No
POL2025 Health Policy in Comparative Perspective 15 No
POL2026 Political Analysis: Behaviour, Institutions, Ideas 15 No
POL2027 The Politics of the World Economy 15 No
POL2046 The Economics of Politics 15 No
POL2047 American Politics 15 No
POL2050 Political Philosophy 15 No
POL2057 Security Studies 15 No
POL2059 Political Thought of Modernity 15 No
POL2076 Rising Powers, Peace and Conflict 15 No
POL2079 Contemporary Public Debate in an Age of 'Anti-Politics' 15 No
POL2081 Thinking about Race: Perspectives from the Biological and Social Sciences 15 No
POL2082 Changing Character of Warfare 15 No
POL2086 Strategy and Psychology in Foreign Policy 15 No
POL2087 Digital Media and Politics 15 No
POL2098 What is Law? Jurisprudence from Stone Tablet to Brain Imaging 15 No
POL2102 Explaining Public Policies 15 No
POL2104 Party Politics and Democracy 15 No
POL2106 America in the World 15 No
POL2112 Politics and Its Discontents 15 No
POL2113 Parliamentary Studies 15 No
POL2114 Issues in Modern British Politics 15 No
POL2115 British Foreign Policy 15 No
POL2116 Political Economy of Armed Conflicts 15 No
POL2117 Great Power Politics 15 No
POL2119 Transformations of Social and Political Realities through Smartphones 15 No
POL2120 Democratic Innovations, Deliberation and Public Policy 15 No
POL2121 Politics and Conflict in Deeply Divided Societies 15 No
POL2122 The Politics and Policies of Youth Engagement 15 No
POL2124 The Politics of the Body 15 No
POL2126 Environmental policy in times of crisis 15 No
POL2127 Electoral Politics 15 No
POL2128 Introduction to Research Design in Politics and International Relations 15 No
PHL2010A Philosophy of Mind 1 15 No
PHL2011A The Philosophy of Nature 1 15 No
PHL2015 Body and Mind 15 No
PHL2016 Metaphysics 15 No
PHL2018 Philosophy of Language 15 No
PHL2020 Virtues and Vices 15 No
PHL2021 Symbolic Logic 15 No
PHL2022 Sex and Death: Introduction to the Philosophy of Biology 15 No
PHL2026 Philosophy of Science 15 No
PHL2038 The Self 15 No
PHL2040 Critical Theory: The Frankfurt School and Communicative Capitalism 15 No
PHL2041 Feminist Philosophy: Gender, Race and Class 15 No
PHL2042 Philosophical Frontiers 15 No
PHL2045 Aesthetics 15 No
PHL2046A The Holocaust, Genocide and Society 30 No
PHL2052 Epistemology 15 No
PHL2053 History of Philosophy 15 No
PHL2054 Philosophy of Psychiatry 15 No
PHL2056 The Nature of Normativity 15 No
PHL2060 Philosophy of Emotion 15 No
PHL2061 Philosophy of Law 15 No
PHL2096 Cyborg Studies 15 No
PHL2111 The Deep Past, History and Humanity 15 No
PHL2112 Practical Ethics 15 No
PHL2114 Aristotle's Ethics 15 No
PHL2117 Philosophy and Psychedelics 15 No
PHL2118 Moral agency in social context 15 No
PHL2119 Animal Minds and Animal Ethics 15 No
PHL2120 Philosophy and Sociology of Race 15 No
PHL2123 Philosophy of Medicine 15 No
PHL2126 Mind and World in Contemporary Japanese Philosophy 15 No
PHL2127 Hidden Voices in Early Modern Philosophy 15 No

Stage 3


Stage 3: 120 credits compulsory modules

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
SSI3020 Employment Experience (UK and Abroad) 120No

Stage 4


Stage 4: 30 credits of compulsory Dissertation, 90 credits of optional modules

Compulsory Module
Students must choose one of the following Dissertation modules.

 

Option Modules
Please note, you must ensure you take a minimum of 120 credits in both Politics and Philosophy across Stages 2 and 3, including a minimum of 30 in both at Stage 4.

 

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
PHL3040 Philosophy Dissertation 30No
POL3040 Dissertation 30No

Optional Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
BA Political and Philosophical Studies Optional Modules Stage 3 or 4
PHL3013 Virtues and Vices 15 No
PHL3014 Symbolic Logic 15 No
PHL3026 Philosophy of Science 15 No
PHL3018 Sex and Death: Introduction to the Philosophy of Biology 15 No
PHL3038 The Self 15 No
PHL3045 Aesthetics 15 No
PHL3046A The Holocaust, Genocide and Society 30 No
PHL3052 Epistemology 15 No
PHL3053 History of Philosophy 15 No
PHL3054 Philosophy of Psychiatry 15 No
PHL3056 The Nature of Normativity 15 No
PHL3060 Philosophy of Emotion 15 No
PHL3061 Philosophy of Law 15 No
PHL3078 Critical Theory: The Frankfurt School and Communicative Capitalism 15 No
PHL3079 Feminist Philosophy: Gender, Race and Class 15 No
PHL3080 Philosophical Frontiers 15 No
PHL3096 Cyborg Studies 15 No
PHL3111 The Deep Past, History and Humanity 15 No
PHL3113 Practical Ethics 15 No
PHL3117 Philosophy and Psychedelics 15 No
PHL3114 Aristotle's Ethics 15 No
PHL3118 Animal Minds and Animal Ethics 15 No
PHL3119 Philosophy and Sociology of Race 15 No
PHL3122 Philosophy of Medicine 15 No
PHL3125 Mind and World in Contemporary Japanese Philosophy 15 No
PHL3126 Hidden Voices in Early Modern Philosophy 15 No
PHL3128 Knowledge, Human Values and Anti-Science 15 No
POL3051 The Media in Europe 30 No
POL3054 Nuclear Weapons in International Relations 15 No
POL3069 Globalisation and the Politics of Resistance 30 No
POL3120 War and Public Opinion 30 No
POL3136 Political Psychology 30 No
POL3156 Central Asian Politics 30 No
POL3168 War and its Aftermath: Interventions and Contemporary Conflict 30 No
POL3174 International Security and US Foreign Policy 30 No
POL3180 Latin American Parties, Politics and Elections 30 No
POL3193 Women in the Criminal Justice System: Law, Policy and Institutions 30 No
POL3194 Rethinking the Politics of Communities 30 No
POL3196 Democracy in the European Union 30 No
POL3202 China in World Affairs 30 No
POL3206 The Political Economy of the State 30 No
POL3217 Feminist Political Theory 30 No
POL3226 Money, Lobbying, and Policymaking 30 No
POL3231 Research Experience 15 No
POL3247 Politics of Biology 15 No
POL3248 Marxism(s) and International Relations 15 No
POL3256 Trumping the Mainstream: The Populist Radical Right and Democratic politics 30 No
POL3259 Climate Justice 30 No
POL3260 Russian Foreign Policy 15 No
POL3264 International Relations in Global History 15 No
POL3267 Misinformation, Misperceptions and Conspiracy Theories 15 No
POL3277 Developments in British Politics: Institutions and Behaviour 15 No
POL3282 World Orders: Past, Present, and Future 30 No
POL3288 Political Science and the Real World 30 No
POL3290 Politics, Elections, and the State in Africa 15 No
POL3291 Disrupting Western and Neo-Liberal Policing of the Global and the Local 30 No
POL3292 LGBTQ+ Policies and Politics in the UK 15 No
POL3293 The Political Economy of Chinese Development 15 No
POL3294 Land, Power and Politics: a critical problem-based approach 15 No
POL3295 Security, Society, and Algorithms 15 No
POL3296 Political Economy of Populism 15 No

6. Programme Outcomes Linked to Teaching, Learning and Assessment Methods

Intended Learning Outcomes
A: Specialised Subject Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

1. 1. Understand the nature and significance of politics as a human activity
2. 2. Analyse and evaluate different political systems operating at the national, European and international level
3. 3. Demonstrate a familiarity with philosophical ideas and arguments concerning the nature of moral values, the complexity of moral judgment, and the social embeddedness of human beliefs and agency
4. 4. Apply the knowledge of those ideas and arguments in such a way that they can be seen to provide guidance in a variety of real-life situations

These ILOs are developed across all programme stages, moving from broad themes in stage 1 to progressively more specialised aspects at stages 2 to 3. The skills are mainly developed through lectures, seminars, and formatively and summatively assessed essay work, practical exercises and special close reading seminars.

ILOs 1-2 are assessed in Politics modules through a combination of term-time essays, oral presentations, examinations and Dissertation work.  ILOs 3-4 are assessed in Philosophy modules through a combination of term-time essays, oral presentations, examinations and Dissertation work.

 

Intended Learning Outcomes
B: Academic Discipline Core Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

5. 5. Gather, organise and deploy evidence and information from a variety of primary and secondary sources
6. 6. Construct reasoned argument, synthesize relevant information, and critically analyse subject material
7. 7. Demonstrate articulacy in identifying underlying issues in all kinds of debate
8. 8. Demonstrate precision of thought and expression in the analysis and formulation of complex and controversial problems
9. 9. Acquire and use data from a range of sources
10. 10. Evaluate evidence critically and synthesize a range of information

Skills are developed throughout the degree programme by lectures and seminars, written work and oral work (both oral presentations and class discussion). A more sophisticated use of these skills is developed in the second and third stages; in the third stage, independent use of these skills is developed through the dissertation and Level 6 optional modules selected by the student.

Skills are assessed through coursework essays (7-12), assessed oral presentations (8-9) and examinations (10-12) at stages 1-2 and through the dissertation at stage 3.

Intended Learning Outcomes
C: Personal/Transferable/Employment Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

11. 11. Communicate effectively and fluently in speech and writing;
12. 12. Use information and communication technology (ICT) for the retrieval and presentation of information;
13. 13. Listen attentively to complex presentations;
14. 14. Read carefully a variety of technical and non-technical material;
15. 15. Demonstrate competence in quantitative, numeracy and problem solving skills;
16. 16. Use basic statistical and econometric techniques with data.

All skills are developed through the preparation and delivery of oral presentations in many modules at all levels in both sides of the programme. They are further developed through one-to-one or small-group tutorials giving feedback on written work, discussion in seminars, written assignments (essays) in most modules and examinations in many modules.

Skills are assessed through formatively assessed seminar presentations (14, 15), written work at all levels and in all modules (15, 16, 17), examination in many modules (13, 17, 18) and the dissertation (13-16).

7. Programme Regulations

Classification

Full details of assessment regulations for all taught programmes can be found in the TQA Manual, specifically in the Credit and Qualifications Framework, and the Assessment, Progression and Awarding: Taught Programmes Handbook. Additional information, including Generic Marking Criteria, can be found in the Learning and Teaching Support Handbook.

8. College Support for Students and Students' Learning

Personal and Academic tutoring: It is University policy that all Faculties should have in place a system of academic and personal tutors. The role of academic tutors is to support you on individual modules; the role of personal tutors is to provide you with advice and support for the duration of the programme and extends to providing you with details of how to obtain support and guidance on personal difficulties such as accommodation, financial difficulties and sickness. You can also make an appointment to see individual teaching staff.

 

As an undergraduate or postgraduate taught student in the Faculty of Social Sciences and International Studies you will be allocated a Personal Tutor at the commencement of your studies.  In normal circumstances your Personal Tutor will remain your tutor throughout your study programme. Your Personal Tutor is normally available through scheduled office hours, but should also see you as a matter of course three or four times a year (depending on your year of study); these meetings may typically commence soon after registration. These meetings will take place once or twice mid-year to discuss your progress and to perhaps consider Personal Development Planning (ePDP) and once to discuss your overall performance. The ePDP is a particularly useful developmental tool which you are encouraged to utilise and which is accessible though the Exeter Learning Environment (ELE).

You should feel that you are able to approach your personal tutor for advice, pastoral support or academic support in a wider sense.

 

Library, ELE and other resources provided to support this programme: The Library offers you core services for learning and research.  Whilst the various locations house a large collection of materials and services, many of our resources are available online through this website http://as.exeter.ac.uk/library/ for you to use at home, work or wherever you are located for your study. Each discipline has a subject librarian on hand to help you to find resources and we also work with tutors to digitise reading lists for inclusion in the Exeter Learning Environment (ELE).

Exeter Learning Environment (ELE) is used throughout the University to make course materials available online. You will be able to access module information, presentations, handouts, reading materials as well as interacting with other students and your tutors. Many tutors use ELE to run assessments and set coursework assignments. In addition to the materials provided by your tutors, there are various other resources available on ELE to help you in your studies, for example, you will be able to access your ePDP, the University’s online PDP system, which has been developed to help you keep an ongoing record of your academic, work and extra-curricular experiences, and help you develop action plans and personal statements.

 

The University provides a range of IT services, including open and training clusters of PCs (available on a 24/7 basis). In the Social Sciences and International Studies College this includes a 24/7 suite in Amory and a second one in the St Luke’s Campus Library. These suites are accessible by swiping your university card.  The majority of the College also has access to the university’s wireless network. Network access is available from the majority of rooms in University halls of residence through the ResNet system.

 

All of these suites have the standard ‘palms’ printing systems in them (printing from credit held on your university card).  At the St Luke’s Campus there is also a cash-based printing service at the GSE Print Unit based in South Cloisters.  

Please see link below for further information on the IT Services facilities on the Exeter Campuses: http://www.exeter.ac.uk/media/universityofexeter/forum/public/Study_map_A4_2pp_Term3.pdf

Helpdesks are maintained on the Streatham and Cornwall campuses.

 

Student/Staff Liaison Committee enables students & staff to jointly participate in the management and review of the teaching and learning provision.

9. University Support for Students and Students' Learning

Please refer to the University Academic Policy and Standards guidelines regarding support for students and students' learning.

10. Admissions Criteria

Undergraduate applicants must satisfy the Undergraduate Admissions Policy of the University of Exeter.

Postgraduate applicants must satisfy the Postgraduate Admissions Policy of the University of Exeter.

Specific requirements required to enrol on this programme are available at the respective Undergraduate or Postgraduate Study Site webpages.

11. Regulation of Assessment and Academic Standards

Each academic programme in the University is subject to an agreed College assessment and marking strategy, underpinned by institution-wide assessment procedures.

The security of assessment and academic standards is further supported through the appointment of External Examiners for each programme. External Examiners have access to draft papers, course work and examination scripts. They are required to attend the Board of Examiners and to provide an annual report. Annual External Examiner reports are monitored at both College and University level. Their responsibilities are described in the University's code of practice. See the University's TQA Manual for details.

(Quality Review Framework.

14. Awarding Institution

University of Exeter

15. Lead College / Teaching Institution

Faculty of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences (HASS)

16. Partner College / Institution

Partner College(s)

Not applicable to this programme

Partner Institution

Not applicable to this programme.

17. Programme Accredited / Validated by

Not applicable to this programme.

18. Final Award

BA (Hons) Political and Philosophical Studies WEEA

19. UCAS Code

Not applicable to this programme.

20. NQF Level of Final Award

6 (Honours)

21. Credit

CATS credits

480

ECTS credits

240

22. QAA Subject Benchmarking Group

23. Dates

Origin Date

08/08/2023

Date of last revision

08/08/2023