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Study information

Programme Specification for the 2023/4 academic year

BSc (Hons) Archaeology with Forensic Science

1. Programme Details

Programme nameBSc (Hons) Archaeology with Forensic Science Programme codeUFS3GAEGAE02
Study mode(s)Part Time
Full Time
Academic year2023/4
Campus(es)Streatham (Exeter)
NQF Level of the Final Award6 (Honours)

2. Description of the Programme

Exeter's Archaeology degrees enable you to explore both the academic and practical dimensions of a uniquely fascinating discipline. Building on a firm foundation of the subject provided in the first year, the degrees give you a wide variety of choice to follow your particular interests. These can cover the microscopic analysis of ancient artefacts to the exploration of entire fossilised landscapes, from understanding prehistoric villages to recording historic buildings; the subject is broad, multi-disciplinary and dynamic. As you work through your degree, you can develop your own specialisation, culminating in a dissertation supported by one-to-one tuition.

Advice and guidance on your programme can be sought from your personal tutor and programme director. All staff offer regular office hours that you can drop into without a prior appointment for this purpose.

3. Educational Aims of the Programme

You will acquire advanced competence in core academic, personal and key skills, providing a basis for career progression in the academic and professional worlds. You will be exposed to a variety of teaching and assessment methods within appropriate learning environments, supported by feedback and monitoring. You will also be given an opportunity to develop your independent study skills through a piece of individual research.

The programme provides an intellectually stimulating, satisfying experience of learning and studying, and forms a sound basis for further study in Archaeology, Forensic Science, or related disciplines. It aims to develop a range of subject-specific, academic and transferable skills, including high order conceptual literacy and communication skills of value in graduate employment.

Archaeology with Forensic Science, like other programmes offered within the College of Humanities, encourages you to become a global citizen, a productive, useful and questioning member of society, and provides thorough training for further study or a specialist career. You may utilise the skills you develop in a range of sectors, including Heritage, Museums, Archaeology, Police, Consultancy, the Civil Service, Education, Teaching, Research, and Charities.

The programme is intended to:

  • To offer an excellent Honours-level education in Archaeology with Forensic Science
  • To encourage graduates to become useful, productive and questioning members of society.
  • To produce graduates who are grounded in the main themes of archaeology through a combination of both broad and detailed focuses on particular aspects of the past, study of a range of time periods, and study of different geographical areas
  • To produce students who have a general basic grounding in the principles of forensic science, and a more specific knowledge of the forensic uses of archaeological science and physical anthropology.
  • To produce graduates who understand the methods which archaeologists use to study the past; and who can analyse the development of past societies.
  • To offer a coherent curriculum, balancing core elements with a wide range of choice to suit students' individual aspirations and requirements.
  • To develop students' competence in the subject-specific skills required in archaeology, and areas of forensic science, through extended practical engagement with primary data, and competence in core academic and personal and key skills, providing a basis for career progression within the academic world and beyond.
  • To expose students to different teaching and assessment methods within an appropriate learning environment, supported by feedback, monitoring and pastoral care.

4. Programme Structure

5. Programme Modules

The following tables describe the programme and constituent modules. Constituent modules may be updated, deleted or replaced as a consequence of the annual programme review of this programme.

http://intranet.exeter.ac.uk/humanities/studying/undergraduates/modules/ 

You may take optional modules as long as any necessary prerequisites have been satisfied, where the timetable allows and if you have not already taken the module in question or an equivalent module.

You may take elective modules up to 30 credits outside of the programme in any stage of the programme as long as any necessary prerequisites have been satisfied, where the timetable allows and if you have not already taken the module in question or an equivalent module.

Stage 1


90 credits of compulsory modules, 30 credits of optional modules

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
ARC1010 Themes in World Archaeology 15Yes
ARC1020 Essential Archaeological Methods 15Yes
ARC1007 Archaeological and Forensic Science Practicals 15No
ARC1008 Forensic Archaeology 15No
ARC1070 Practical Skills in Archaeology 30No

Optional Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
ARC BA Archaeology with Forensic Science Stage 1 Optional modules 2023-4
ARA1030 Introduction to Islamic Archaeology 15 No
ARC1030 Investigating British Archaeology 15 No
ARC1040 Artefacts and Materials 15 No
ARC1050 Objects: Contexts and Display 15 No

Stage 2


75 credits of compulsory modules, 45 credits of optional modules (including HUM2000 and HUM2001 Humanities in the Workplace).

a You must take either ARC2003 or ARC2004 (you cannot choose both).

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
ARC ARC2003-ARC2004 [See note a above]
ARC2003 Archaeological Fieldwork Project 30 Yes
ARC2004 Archaeological Fieldschool 30 Yes
ARC2514 Forensic Anthropology 15No
BIO2068 Forensic Science 30No

Optional Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
ARC S2 BA SH and CH opt 2023-4
ARC2003 Archaeological Fieldwork Project 30 No
ARA2014 Regions and Empires in Islamic Archaeology 15 No
ARC2004 Archaeological Fieldschool 30 No
ARC2012 Monumental Changes: Neolithic and Early Bronze Age Britain and Ireland 15 No
ARC2120 Things and Us: Ancient and Contemporary Material Culture 15 No
ARC2121 Brooches, Beads, Swords and Shields: Early Medieval Material Culture 15 No
ARC2123 Sustainability and Collapse in Past Societies 15 No
ARC2130 Discovering the Past with Molecular Science 15 No
ARC2401 Understanding the Landscape of Medieval Britain 15 No
ARC2406 Medieval Castles in Context 15 No
ARC2408 Romanisation: Interaction, Conquest and Change in Late Iron Age and Roman Dacia 15 No
ARC2504 Zooarchaeology 15 No
ARC2514 Forensic Anthropology 15 No
ARC2516 Human Origins and Evolution: the Lower and Middle Palaeolithic 15 No
CLA2514 Ancient Sources (Material Evidence) - Pompeii: Destruction, Discovery and Afterlife 15 No
CLA2517 Ancient Sources (Material Evidence): Hellenistic Palaces in West Asia 15 No
HIH2002 Uses of the Past 30 No
HIH2208A Medieval Paris 30 No
HIH2234 Sailors, Slavery and Piracy: The Atlantic World, 1600 - 1800 30 No
HIH2592 Science, Empire, and Natural History Museums: A Global Perspective 30 No
HUM HUM2000-HUM2001
HUM2000 Humanities in the Workplace 30 No
HUM2001 Humanities in the Workplace 15 No
HUM HUM2004-HUM2005
HUM2004 Making a Career in Publishing 15 No
HUM2005 Tales of Freedom, Necessity and Providence 15 No

Stage 3


45 credits of compulsory modules, 75 credits of optional modules

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
ARC3000 Archaeological Dissertation 30Yes
ARC3611 Funerary Osteoarchaeology 15No

Optional Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
ARC SF BA SH and CH opt 2023-4
ARC3003 Professional Placement 30 No
ARC3006 Advanced Fieldwork Project 15 No
ARC3011 Practicing Archaeological Science 15 No
ARC3012 Monumental changes: Neolithic and Early Bronze Age Britain and Ireland 15 No
ARC3120 Things and Us: Ancient and Contemporary Material Culture 15 No
ARC3121 Brooches, Beads, Swords and Shields: Early Medieval Material Culture 15 No
ARC3123 Sustainability and Collapse in Past Societies 15 No
ARC3401 Understanding the Landscape of Medieval Britain 15 No
ARC3406 Medieval Castles in Context 15 No
ARC3510 Experimental Approaches to Forensic and Archaeological Investigations 15 No
ARC3516 Human Origins and Evolution: the Lower and Middle Palaeolithic 15 No
ARC3611 Funerary Osteoarchaeology 15 No
ARC3408 Romanisation: Interaction, Conquest and Change in Late Iron Age and Roman Dacia 15 No
ARC3133 Digital Pasts 15 No
HUM HUM3000s
HUM3002 Aliens Abroad: Science Fiction in Global Literature 15 No
HUM3015 The Place of Meaning: Gardens in Britain and China 15 No
HUM3016 Book Publishing: Principles of Book Commissioning, Editing and Design 30 No
HUM3003A Hacking the Humanities: How to Plan and Run Successful Digital Projects 15 No
HUM3003 Hacking the Humanities: How to Plan and Run Successful Digital Projects 30 No
HUM3004 Transforming the Tablet: Digital Approaches to Ancient Text and Artefact 15 No

6. Programme Outcomes Linked to Teaching, Learning and Assessment Methods

Intended Learning Outcomes
A: Specialised Subject Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

1. Understand basic archaeological techniques and appreciate their major advantages and disadvantages.
2. Appreciate the relationship between data collected in the field and its interpretation.
3. Identify the different roles of professional archaeologists.
4. Understand the chronology of archaeological periods and the main themes in archaeology from early prehistory to the end of the Middle Ages.
5. Show familiarity with some key archaeological sites and finds.
6. Show competence in the various techniques of practical Archaeology and an understanding of their problems and possibilities.
7. Use appropriate archaeological terminology.
8. Deploy information from technical projects.
9. Demonstrate understanding (at increasing depth, according to level) of thematic/methodological issues (increasingly complex, according to level). Forensic Science
10. Demonstrate an understanding of the analytical techniques used in forensic science and their underpinning scientific principles
11. Demonstrate knowledge of techniques of physical anthropology and archaeological science and their application in forensic investigations.
12. Demonstrate knowledge of how forensic evidence is collected at a crime scene and presented in court.
13. Discuss the application of science in the context of crime detection and the law.

1-3 are developed initially through first year modules, particularly ARC1020, and then through ARC2003/4, and in increasing sophistication through options during stages 2 and 3.

4 and 5 are introduced through first year modules, particularly ARC1010, and developed through thematic options at stages 2 and 3.

6-8 are introduced in ARC1020 and developed in ARC2003/4, and further enhanced through thematic options at stages 2 and 3.

9 is developed through the optional thematic modules taken across all three stages. The level of competence expected of students intensifies at each stage of the programme. Methodological issues area introduced through ARC1020 and developed through ARC2003/4. The chronological and thematic framework are introduced in ARC1010 and optional modules at stage 1 and developed through options at stages 2 and 3. ARC3000 at stage 3 brings the methodological and thematic elements together in an independent research dissertation.

10-13 are all developed in BIO2068.

11 is developed in detail in ARC1007, ARC1008, ARC2514 and ARC3611

The assessment of these skills is through a combination of term-time essays, other written reports/projects, oral presentations, a fieldwork-related project, a dissertation and unseen examinations

Intended Learning Outcomes
B: Academic Discipline Core Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

14. Draw thematic comparisons between material from different sources.
15. Show awareness of contrasting approaches to research.
16. Show awareness of contrasting approaches to research.
17. Understand the difference between qualitative and quantitative data.
18. Show clear awareness of the basic philosophical questions arising from academic research.
19. Think and write broadly about large themes
20. Comprehend and deploy complex terminology and discourses.
21. Use a library, field visits and the world-wide web to find information.
22. Deploy critical argument, based on professional standards of evidence use.
23. Identify problems of reliability and bias in, and more generally evaluate, evidence.
24. Reference sources accurately in written work, including use of the Harvard system in Archaeology.
25. Answer questions concisely in writing.
26. Present work and answer questions orally.
27. Think of pertinent and intellectually demanding questions to ask other students.

These skills are developed throughout the degree programme, but the emphasis becomes more complex as students move from stage to stage. They are developed through lectures and seminars, written work, and oral work (both presentation and class discussion).

The assessment of these skills is through a combination of term-time essays, other written reports/projects, oral presentations, a fieldwork-related project, a dissertation and unseen examinations. 

Intended Learning Outcomes
C: Personal/Transferable/Employment Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

28. Undertake independent study and work to deadlines.
29. Use a word processor, and the world-wide web.
30. Digest, select and organise material from disparate sources for suitably illustrated, clear and concise written work of varying length.
31. Evaluate own work.
32. Participate in discussions; present and evaluate complex arguments and ideas orally; digest, select and organise material for oral presentations.
33. Work with others as part of a team.
34. Interact effectively with peers and staff
35. Undertake group work, including the presentation and discussion of material in groups
36. Plan and execute a demanding piece of work over a long time scale.

28 is an essential part of the successful completion of the programme, notably the dissertation.
29 is developed through the requirement that all written work be word-processed, and through use of the internet as a general research tool in all modules. There is further scope for developing IT skills through optional modules.
30 is developed through a variety of written assignments and tutorials throughout the programme.
31 is developed through the self-assessment involved in completing cover sheets for all assignments.
32 is developed through group work and seminars, which form an important component of many option modules.
33 & 34 The skills in 33 and 34 are developed particularly through the archaeology fieldwork/fieldschool modules which involve working as part of a team.

35 is developed through many thematic and skills modules which include group work. 33, 34 and 35 are also developed through interaction in seminars and in discussion with tutors about essay work, and in response to critical review both collective and individual.
36 is developed through the Archaeology Fieldwork Project at stage 2 and dissertation work at stage 3 (both of which work

The skills in 28, 29 and 30 are assessed in all modules.  3 is covered by the fact that students prepare written assignments of differing lengths, ranging from 1500 word essays through to the 9000 word dissertation. Formative assessment of group oral presentations (32,33,35 ) occurs in a range of modules. 9 is covered by the dissertation and ARC2003/2004.

7. Programme Regulations

Classification

Full details of assessment regulations for all taught programmes can be found in the TQA Manual, specifically in the Credit and Qualifications Framework, and the Assessment, Progression and Awarding: Taught Programmes Handbook. Additional information, including Generic Marking Criteria, can be found in the Learning and Teaching Support Handbook.

8. College Support for Students and Students' Learning

All students within Archaeology have a personal tutor for their entire programme of study, whom they meet at least three times a year, and who are available for at least two hours a week. Personal tutors also conduct a Personal Development Planning (PDP) interview in January when students discuss a pre-completed self-appraisal with their tutor, and agree an 'action plan' to consolidate and improve performance over the coming year.

Programme handbooks and other useful information can be accessed via the student intranet: http://intranet.exeter.ac.uk/humanities/studying/taughthandbook/  

Other useful information and student resources can be accessed via the Exeter Learning Environment (ELE): http://vle.exeter.ac.uk/login/index.php , which has specific information on library skills, essay writing and research skills.

9. University Support for Students and Students' Learning

Please refer to the University Academic Policy and Standards guidelines regarding support for students and students' learning.

10. Admissions Criteria

Undergraduate applicants must satisfy the Undergraduate Admissions Policy of the University of Exeter.

Postgraduate applicants must satisfy the Postgraduate Admissions Policy of the University of Exeter.

Specific requirements required to enrol on this programme are available at the respective Undergraduate or Postgraduate Study Site webpages.

11. Regulation of Assessment and Academic Standards

Each academic programme in the University is subject to an agreed College assessment and marking strategy, underpinned by institution-wide assessment procedures.

The security of assessment and academic standards is further supported through the appointment of External Examiners for each programme. External Examiners have access to draft papers, course work and examination scripts. They are required to attend the Board of Examiners and to provide an annual report. Annual External Examiner reports are monitored at both College and University level. Their responsibilities are described in the University's code of practice. See the University's TQA Manual for details.

(Quality Review Framework.

14. Awarding Institution

University of Exeter

15. Lead College / Teaching Institution

Faculty of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences (HASS)

16. Partner College / Institution

Partner College(s)

Not applicable to this programme

Partner Institution

Not applicable to this programme.

17. Programme Accredited / Validated by

0

18. Final Award

BSc (Hons) Archaeology with Forensic Science

19. UCAS Code

F490

20. NQF Level of Final Award

6 (Honours)

21. Credit

CATS credits

360

ECTS credits

180

22. QAA Subject Benchmarking Group

[Honours] Forensic science
[Honours] Archaeology

23. Dates

Origin Date

01/10/2010

Date of last revision

02/09/2021