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Study information

Programme Specification for the 2024/5 academic year

BSc (Hons) Finance: Data Science

1. Programme Details

Programme nameBSc (Hons) Finance: Data Science Programme codeUFS3SBESBE19
Study mode(s)Level 1
Academic year2024/5
Campus(es)Streatham (Exeter)
NQF Level of the Final Award6 (Honours)

2. Description of the Programme

Our BSc Finance: Data Science programme is designed for diverse learners who are interested in following a wide range of career destinations within the banking and financial services, private and public sectors, and the broader corporate world, as well as specialist postgraduate studies. Flexibility is embedded in the programme to provide a rigorous balance of core knowledge and skills in finance together with practical application in a variety of contexts. Students will develop a well-balanced understanding across finance, accounting, economics, econometrics, management and data science and gain insight into recent technological developments in the industry. 

The programme is an innovative interdisciplinary course designed with the industry employability needs in mind. Students will be equipped with the skills and knowledge in financial decision-making and commercial awareness in environmental sustainability, responsible leadership and technological transformation.

The programme combines the academic rigour of Exeter’s long tradition of teaching and research excellence with the achievement of industry-recognised professional qualifications. Modules are delivered with research-led curriculum combined with practical learning elements embedded throughout each stage of the programme. Environmental sustainability principles and ethos will be embedded throughout the curriculum.

Using principles of research-led and problem-based learning, students are supported to demonstrate cognitive abilities and generic skills, such as critical evaluation of arguments and evidence, independent and self-managed learning, problem-solving and decision-making, communication and presentation, teamwork and collaboration, and enhanced technical abilities. Students also develop well-rounded core behaviours, including honesty and integrity, self-awareness, resilience and enthusiasm, innovation and creativity, and inclusive collaboration. Students will apply new knowledge to deepen their understanding and engage with economic, social and environmental principles of sustainable decision-making.

Each stage of study is structured to incorporate lectures, seminars, workshops and independent guided self-study hours. The learning, assessment and feedback activities are designed to achieve an appropriate balance between the conceptual (including theoretical) and applied aspects of the subject. The extent to which the degree course reflects current research and contemporary debate in the subject are embedded in a variety of problem-based assignments, including the applied finance project in the final year.

Students will study modules that are closely aligned to the curriculum of professional bodies, such as the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) Institute and the Chartered Institute for Securities and Investment (CISI). Graduates of this programme are able to work towards certain qualifications by applying to the relevant professional body, depending on the modules taken during the programme and the marks attained.

3. Educational Aims of the Programme

The programme has been designed to ensure all aspects of the QAA Subject Benchmark standard are met. In line with the QAA Subject Benchmark Statement for Finance, this degree is:

Awarded to learners who have demonstrated:

Subject-Specific Knowledge and Skills

1)    An appreciation of the nature of the contexts in which finance can be seen as operating, including knowledge of the institutional framework necessary for understanding the role, operation and function of markets and financial institutions (for example, the economic, ethical, legal, political, regulatory, social and tax environment, both national and international; the firm; the capital markets; and the public sector).

2)    Knowledge of the major theoretical tools and theories of finance, and their relevance and application to theoretical and practical problems (for example, the concept of arbitrage and examples of its use; financial mathematics; informational efficiency; optimal risk sharing; portfolio theory; asset pricing models and the valuation of securities; cost of capital; derivative pricing; risk management; information asymmetry; principal-agent relationships; signalling; Fisher separation and capital budgeting criteria; behavioural finance; term structure and the movement of interest rates; determination of exchange rates; and financial intermediation).

3)    An understanding of the relationship between financial theory and empirical testing, and application of this knowledge to the appraisal of the empirical evidence in at least one major theoretical area. The appraisal should involve some recognition of the limitations and evolution of empirical tests and theory (for example, the efficient markets hypothesis; anomalies; risk management; pricing of derivatives and other securities; portfolio management; interest rates; exchange rates; raising capital and capital structure).

4)    An ability to interpret financial data, including that arising in the context of the firm or household from accounting statements and data generated in financial markets. The interpretation should involve analysis using statistical and financial functions and procedures such as are routinely available in spreadsheets and other statistical/econometric software packages. It may involve the skills necessary to manipulate financial data and carry out statistical and econometric tests (for example, estimation and interpretation of asset pricing models; financial modelling and projections; event studies and residuals analysis; elements of time series analysis, such as serial correlation, mean reversion, and stochastic volatility).

5)    An understanding of the financing arrangements and governance mechanisms and structures of business entities, and an appreciation of how theory and evidence can be combined to assess the effectiveness and efficiency of such arrangements (for example, decisions as to sources of finance and financial structure; the pricing of corporate securities; the market for corporate control; corporate governance; financial planning; and international dimensions of finance).

6)    An understanding of the factors influencing the investment behaviour and opportunities of private individuals (for example, bonds, equities, and derivatives; risk aversion; risk/return trade-offs; portfolio management and performance measurement; pensions and long-term savings; the tax treatment of savings and investments; international diversification; foreign exchange risk; objectives of, and constraints on, institutional investors and advisers).

7)    An understanding of financial service activities in the economy, and the factors that are changing these activities over time, and an appreciation of how finance theory and evidence can be employed to aid such understanding (for example, ideas of information asymmetry, moral hazard and risk sharing could be employed to analyse the fundamental nature of services, such as insurance, pensions, bank lending and consumer credit, and also explore fundamental problems arising in such financial service provision; the efficient market hypothesis could be used to explore the value added by investment and financial services).

8) An ability to understand financial statements, and a reasonable appreciation of the limitations of financial reporting and disclosure practices and procedures (for example, financial statement analysis; the relation between cash flow accounting and accrual accounting; discretionary accounting practices; and financial statement derived measures of financial performance, including risk).

On completion of a degree covered by this Subject Benchmark Statement, a student is generally expected to have the following abilities and skills:

Cognitive Abilities and Generic Skills

1)    critical evaluation of arguments and evidence

2)    independent and self-managed learning

3)    analysis, filtering and evaluation of data, and drawing reasoned conclusions concerning structured and, to a more limited extent, unstructured problems from a given set of data and from data acquired by the student

4)    location, extraction and analysis of data from multiple sources, including acknowledging and referencing of sources

5)    numeracy, including the processing and analysis of financial and other numerical data and the appreciation of statistical concepts at an appropriate level

6)    using contemporary information and communications technology for the acquisition, analysis and communication of financial information

7)    communication, including presenting quantitative and qualitative information, together with analysis, argument and commentary, in a form appropriate to the intended audience, and oral as well as written presentation

8)    working with others (such as through small group projects).

Threshold graduates will be able to:

1)    demonstrate a reasonable appreciation of the nature of the context and institutional framework in which finance operates

2)    demonstrate a reasonable knowledge of the main theories used in finance and a reasonable ability to apply them in straightforward structured situations from given data generated for the purpose

3)    reveal a reasonable ability to interpret financial data and carry out straightforward statistical and financial analysis

4)    relate empirical evidence to finance theory in at least one of the main areas of finance with a reasonable understanding of the significance and limitations of such evidence

5)    demonstrate an understanding of the financial needs of business entities, a reasonable appreciation and understanding of how theory and evidence may be used to guide practice; the workings of capital markets; the relationship between risk and return; and the nature and use of financial derivatives

6)    demonstrate a reasonable understanding of the principles of personal investment

7)    demonstrate a reasonable ability to use and interpret the information in financial statements

8)    demonstrate possession of the required cognitive abilities and non-subject specific skills to a reasonable level of attainment

9)    demonstrate a reasonable understanding of the economic, political, regulatory and social environments in which finance and financial services operates, and the ethical considerations embedded in these operations.

4. Programme Structure

5. Programme Modules

The following tables describe the programme and constituent modules. Constituent modules may be updated, deleted or replaced as a consequence of the annual programme review of this programme. Details of the modules currently offered may be obtained from the Faculty web site

https://www.exeter.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/accounting/finance/

You may take Option Modules as long as any necessary prerequisites have been satisfied, where the timetable allows and if you have not already taken the module in question or an equivalent module. Descriptions of the individual modules are given in full on the Faculty web site

http://business-school.exeter.ac.uk/programmes/undergraduate/modules/

You may take Elective Modules up to 30 credits outside of the programme in second or third stage of the programme as long as any necessary prerequisites have been satisfied, where the timetable allows and if you have not already taken the module in question or an equivalent module.  

The fourth character of any module code signifies its NQF level, according to the following scheme:

Fourth Character

NQF level

1 -

Level 4

2 -

Level 5

3 -

Level 6

Stage 1


Stage 1: 120 credits of compulsory modules

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
BEF1015 Finance and Investment 15Yes
BEA1014 Statistical Methods for Accounting and Finance 15Yes
BEA1008 Introduction to Financial Accounting 15Yes
BEE1029 Economic Principles 30No
BEM1028 Introduction to Business and Management 15Yes
BEE1023 Introduction to Econometrics 15Yes
BEE1038 Introduction to Data Science in Economics 15Yes

Stage 2


Stage 2:  75 credits of compulsory modules, 45 credits of optional modules

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
BEF2012 Ethics and Corporate Governance 15No
BEA2018 Corporate Finance 15Yes
BEF2013 Investment Practice 15No
BEF2014 Financial Reporting and Analysis 15Yes
BEF2016 FinTech in Investment Management 15No

Optional Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
BSc Finance: Data Science S2 optional modules 24-25
BEF2015 Quantitative Methods 30 No
BEM2039 Business Analytics in Practice 15 No
BEM2034 Digital Technologies and the Future of Work 15 No
BEM2027 Information Systems 15 No
BEE2031 Econometrics 15 No
BEE2041 Data Science in Economics 15 No
COM2012 Data Science in Society 15 No

Stage 3


Stage 3: 75 credits of compulsory modules, 45 credits of optional modules         

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
BEF3009 Financial Institutions' Risk Management 15No
BEA3018 Advanced Corporate Finance 15Yes
BEA3028 Sustainable and Responsible Finance 15No
BEF3010 Applied Finance Project 30Yes

Optional Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
BSc Finance: Data Science S3/4 optional modules 24-25
BEA3026 Financial Modelling 15 No
BEE3066 Machine Learning for Economics 15 No
BEE3109 Bitcoin, Money and Trust 15 No
BEM3055 Ethics and Responsible Innovation 15 No
BEM3070 Media, Al and the Metaverse 15 No

6. Programme Outcomes Linked to Teaching, Learning and Assessment Methods

Intended Learning Outcomes
A: Specialised Subject Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

Intended Learning Outcomes
B: Academic Discipline Core Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

Intended Learning Outcomes
C: Personal/Transferable/Employment Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

7. Programme Regulations

Classification

8. College Support for Students and Students' Learning

9. University Support for Students and Students' Learning

10. Admissions Criteria

11. Regulation of Assessment and Academic Standards

12. Indicators of Quality and Standards

The programme is not subject to accreditation and/ or review by professional and statutory regulatory bodies (PSRBs).

13. Methods for Evaluating and Improving Quality and Standards

14. Awarding Institution

15. Lead College / Teaching Institution

Faculty of Environment, Science and Economy (ESE)

16. Partner College / Institution

Partner College(s)

Not applicable to this programme

Partner Institution

Not applicable to this programme.

17. Programme Accredited / Validated by

Not applicable to this programme.

18. Final Award

BSc (Hons) Finance: Data Science

19. UCAS Code

Not applicable to this programme.

20. NQF Level of Final Award

6 (Honours)

21. Credit

CATS credits ECTS credits

22. QAA Subject Benchmarking Group

23. Dates

Origin Date Date of last revision