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Study information

Programme Specification for the 2023/4 academic year

BSc (Hons) Medical Sciences with Professional Training Year

1. Programme Details

Programme nameBSc (Hons) Medical Sciences with Professional Training Year Programme codeUFS4EMSEMS01
Study mode(s)Full Time
Academic year2023/4
Campus(es)Streatham (Exeter)
St Luke's (Exeter)
NQF Level of the Final Award6 (Honours)

2. Description of the Programme

Our Medical Sciences with Professional Training year (PTY) programme provides a firm foundation in the core biomedical and biomolecular sciences, alongside an insight into medical practice and the biotechnologies used to prevent, test and diagnose disorders and treat patients.  To achieve this, the first part of the programme explores the bioscience advances underpinning the advancement of modern medical practice and gives you a wide ranging insight into how the human body normally works. We study this through focused small-group sessions designed to explore key scientific concepts and systems presented in the form of triggers. The style of trigger varies week by week but will include authentic patient-based clinical case studies, current media-worthy medical science breakthroughs and extracts from research papers. We then build on this foundation to see how things can go wrong in the body due to disease and how normal function might be restored. In this way you will develop a holistic understanding of human health that you can put into practice in a clinical setting as well as robust research skills, plus creative and inquisitive communication, leadership, critical appraisal and problem solving skills. You complete the same first year regardless of whether you choose Medical Sciences with PTY or one of our four specialist Medical Science with PTY pathways (Neuroscience, Human Genomics, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, or Health Research) to study a particular area in more depth, with your chosen specialism named as part of your degree title, for example, BSc Medical Sciences with PTY (Human Genomics). You will be introduced to modules in year two which are designated to the pathways and in the final year you will study advanced pathway specific modules and complete a research project within your chosen area. Alternatively, you may wish to graduate without ‘specialising’ in a pathway.   

 

The following pathways are available:

-       BSc (Hons) Medical Sciences with PTY (Human Genomics)

-       BSc (Hons) Medical Sciences with PTY (Neuroscience)

-       BSc (Hons) Medical Sciences with PTY (Pharmacology and Therapeutics)

-       BSc (Hons) Medical Sciences with PTY (Health Research)

A particular feature of this programme is that stage 3 is spent in a competitive-entry professional training placement. The Professional Training Year (PTY) is spent with an appropriate pharmaceutical or biotechnology company or a university or Trust laboratory in the UK or abroad. During the Professional Training Year you will have support from and regular contact with your academic tutor in addition to a placement supervisor at the company.  

The overall programme, therefore, offers an innovative-approach to learning that includes supportive small-group learning; lectures, interactive seminars and workshops from world-leading experts in genetics, cell biology, microbiology, bioinformatics, molecular biology, biochemistry, genomics and chemical biology; internationally renowned e-learning resources; hands-on sessions in research laboratories and clinical settings; inspirational clinician-scientist-patient sessions to develop career opportunities and employability training.  Future career pathways include postgraduate study, either at a university or with the NHS; employment in knowledge industries, such as pharmaceuticals or medical technology (with roles in research and development, clinical trials, or sales and marketing); training and employment to become a Scientific Officer in the Civil Service; NHS management; postgraduate training for the NHS Scientist Training Programme (STP); or graduate entry to professional degrees such as medicine, radiotherapy or other accredited healthcare programmes.

3. Educational Aims of the Programme

1. To develop skilled, creative and inquisitive graduates who are well prepared for successful graduate-level employment (e.g. in research to improve the health of individuals and the community by “translating” findings into diagnostic tools, medicines, procedures, policies and education etc);
2. To provide you with knowledge and understanding of translating science into clinical practice, from the fundamentals to the frontiers of the subject;
3. To provide you with the basic scientific, intellectual, and practical training that will prepare you for lifelong learning, demanded by today’s competitive professional environment worldwide;
4. To offer you the opportunity to develop a more detailed understanding of the discipline by specialising in an area linked to the Medical School’s international research strengths.
5. To provide an opportunity to develop and apply knowledge, theory and skills within a professional training placement setting; and
6. To enable you to experience a supportive learning environment that fosters evidence-based academic and reflective personal development.

The programme introduces you to a foundation in the Medical Sciences, and subsequently enhances this competence and the development of intellectual capabilities within an institution that is committed to advancing research, scholarship and learning, and to disseminating knowledge.  With this in mind, and underpinned by core biomedical sciences, successful students will develop a holistic understanding of social, health and environmental factors that impact human health and how new scientific discoveries across these areas are translated into practice to benefit front-line clinicians, their multidisciplinary teams and ultimately their patients.

N.B. The programme does not train students to be “NHS Healthcare Scientists” or “Clinical Scientists”, able to apply immediately for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council.  As a life-sciences graduate, however, you may be able to enrol on the accredited (competitive-entry) postgraduate NHS Scientist Training Programme (STP). For further information on NHS careers, please visit http://www.nhscareers.nhs.uk/.

4. Programme Structure

The programme is of 4 year duration and studied full time at National Qualification Framework (NQF) level 6 (as confirmed against the FHEQ), which is divided into ‘stages’. Each stage is normally equivalent to an academic year. You will be located at St Luke’s and Streatham Campuses of the University of Exeter for the duration of your studies. Year 3 will be competitive entry to the Professional Training Year (PTY) which could be based anywhere in the UK or overseas. The programme is divided into units of study called ‘modules’ which are assigned a number of ‘credits’. The credit rating of a module is proportional to the total workload, with 1 credit being nominally equivalent to 10 hours of work.

If you are unsuccessful in your College-supported application(s) for a competitive-entry PTY placement, you will normally be transferred to the 3-year BSc (Hons) Medical Sciences undergraduate programme.

Pathways:

From Year 2 you can choose one of the four specialism pathways or you can stay on the core BSc (Hons) Medical Sciences with PTY programme. The pathways are as follows:

-       BSc (Hons) Medical Sciences (Human Genomics). See separate programme specification on this link:   https://ipams.exeter.ac.uk/programmes/descriptions/index/programmeId/3948  

-       BSc (Hons) Medical Sciences (Neuroscience). See separate programme specification on this link:  https://ipams.exeter.ac.uk/programmes/descriptions/index/programmeId/3949  

-       BSc (Hons) Medical Sciences (Pharmacology and Therapeutics). See separate programme specification on this link:  https://ipams.exeter.ac.uk/programmes/descriptions/index/programmeId/3945  

-       BSc (Hons) Medical Sciences (Health Research). See separate programme specification on this link:  https://ipams.exeter.ac.uk/programmes/descriptions/index/programmeId/4397  

The following programmes are also available to transfer to (please see the separate programme specifications for any special requirements):

 - BSc (Hons) Medical Sciences

 - BSc (Hons) Medical Sciences Part-Time.

 - MSci (Hons) Medical Sciences (Human Genomics)

For full details of the programme, including module details and career prospects, please visit the Faculty of Health Sciences website https://www.exeter.ac.uk/departments/hls/ .

5. Programme Modules

The following tables describe the programme and constituent modules. Constituent modules may be updated, deleted or replaced as a consequence of the annual programme review of this programme.

http://www.exeter.ac.uk/medicine/medicalsciences

You may take Optional Modules as long as any necessary prerequisites have been satisfied, where the timetable allows and if you have not already taken the module in question or an equivalent module. Descriptions of the individual modules are given in full on the Medical Sciences web site https://medicine.exeter.ac.uk/study/modules/ .

You may take Elective Modules up to 30 credits outside of the programme, through the module change process,  in stages 2 and 3 of the programme as long as any necessary prerequisites have been satisfied, where the timetable allows and if you have not already taken the module in question or an equivalent module.  

Stage 1


In your first year you will follow a compulsory programme of 120 credits which is common to all BSc Medical Sciences students, in which you will explore the science that underpins the advancement of modern medical practice. The emphasis is on basic cellular and molecular biology and understanding the normal functioning of the human body, from enzymes through to whole biological systems. Without this core knowledge of how the body works, it would be impossible for us, as scientists, to devise the new diagnostic tests, drugs or treatments that will best benefit patients.

Alongside traditional lectures, tutorials and laboratory practicals, you will engage in small group work where you are given the freedom to explore a scientific topic under the expert guidance of our tutors (in the Integrated Human Physiology module). Your core laboratory skills will be developed through laboratory-based practicals that run alongside and support your other sessions. Some sessions also involve a doctor, scientist and patient to explore key clinical cases from three different perspectives.

You will begin to compile your Personal Development and Professionalism Portfolio, in which you chart your progress from a new student to a professional individual ready for the world of employment. You’ll do this by analysing your academic performance and employability skills through reflection and the frequent feedback offered by the school to identify opportunities for personal and professional development, in order to help you achieve your career goals.

Support for your academic progress and career planning is provided by your Academic Tutor.  Additionally, training and support is provided through various workshops and seminars organised by the Programme’s Academic Lead for Careers and Employability within the compulsory core module, Fundamental Skills for Medical Scientists (CSC1004, 30 credits) and the non-credit-bearing module, Academic and Professional Support (CSC1905).  Some of these sessions are delivered by the dedicated Careers Consultant assigned to the Faculty.  At this level, you will begin to compile your Personal Development and Professionalism portfolio, a collection of work and feedback that documents your development into a highly employable, skilled graduate.

Please note that successful completion of the University’s training on Academic Honesty and Plagiarism, within the CSC1004 module, is compulsory in order for you to progress to Stage 2 of study. In order to pass, you must achieve at least 80% on the assessment, but you may attempt the assessment as many times as is necessary.

You will also receive lectures and information during Stage 1 to preview different specialist pathways available to inform your choice in Year 2 if you decide to study a topic in more depth.   

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
CSC1004 Fundamental Skills for Medical Scientists 30No
CSC1005 Integrated Human Physiology 30No
BIO1332 Biochemistry 15No
BIO1334 Genetics 15No
BIO1337 Microbiology 15No
BIO1339 Cells 15No

Stage 2


The second year focuses on the scientific basis of important diseases, beginning with some fundamental insights into the ways in which human biology goes awry in disease. This knowledge is then used to explore how cutting-edge scientific technologies can be exploited to advance disease diagnosis and treatment.

Within a variety of learning environments, including lectures, tutorials, workshops, laboratory practicals and small group learning, you will have opportunities to investigate and debate how disease develops and how healthcare can be improved. Key aspects of applied research are explored including clinical and medical research methods and its design and setting (including governance, ethics, funding, testable hypothesis development, data handling and communication) within healthcare environments. Your understanding of these areas develops through a variety of hands-on learning opportunities which enhance your practical research skills and knowledge of contemporary medical research issues.

When choosing modules for Stage 2, you will need to consider whether you will continue with the core programme, or if you intend to embark on a specialism pathway.  A specialism entails completing the core modules for the BSc (Hons) Medical Sciences, plus at least 90 Level 5 and Level 6 credits from specialist modules in a given area of medical science. Some of these specialist credits may reflect optional module choices, whereas other modules are compulsory for the pathway, and the 45-credit final year Project CSC3028 (Medical Sciences Literature Review) or CSC3029 (Medical Sciences Research Project) must explore a subject appropriate to the given specialism.

In order to be eligible to graduate with a pathway, you must have passed (not condoned) at least 90 credits in the discipline, including those deemed compulsory to the pathway. Students for whom this is not the case will still be able to graduate with BSc (Hons) Medical Sciences, provided that the required number of overall credits (including condoned modules) is met. Specialist designation of all modules, projects, dissertations etc. will be confirmed by the University of Exeter Medical School and may be granted, withdrawn or amended by accordingly.

You are required to take a minimum of 30 credits of Bioscience modules across your second and final years of study. At least one module (15 credits) must be taken in Stage 2 as a prerequisite to be eligible for final year Biosciences modules.

If you wish to continue on the core programme, BSc (Hons) Medical Sciences, you are required to take 60 credits of compulsory modules and select 60 credits from the modules shown in Table 2, below, and those developed and advertised annually on the Medical Sciences webpages.

Please note that no more than 120 credits may be studied at Stage Two.

In addition to the core/optional modules, you will participate in a number of activities in the non-credit bearing modules, Academic Tutor Group and Employability (CSC2909 and CSC2905) to build your Personal Development and Professionalism portfolio.  You will receive dedicated careers support and advice from your Academic Tutor, the Faculty Careers Consultant and the Academic Lead for Careers and Employability.

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
CSC2012 Disease, Diagnostics and Therapeutics 30No
CSC2023 Experimental Design and Statistics 30No

Optional Modules

a You may only take one of these two optional modules: CSC2008 Immunopathology, CSC2009 Anatomical Sciences and CSC2004 Medical Genetics.

bIf you take CSC2008 (Immunopathology), you will not be permitted to take BIO3078 (Cellular Basis of Immunity) in final year.

c You may only take one of these three optional modules: CSC2007 Introduction to Health Research, CSC2025 Decolonising Medicine and BIO2089 Molecular Biology of the Gene

d You may only take one of these four optional modules: CSC2020 Coding for Medical Scientists, CSC2022 Ethical Issues in Health Research, BIO2101 Advanced Microbiology and CSC2026 The Biology of Cancer

e You may only take one of these three optional modules: NEU1006 Introduction to Neuroscience, BIO2092 Genomics and Intro. Bioinformatics and CSC2027 Experimental Pharmacology

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
BIO2088 Advanced Cell Biology 15No
BIO2089 Molecular Biology of the Gene (See note c)15No
BIO2092 Genomics and Introductory Bioinformatics (See note e)15No
BIO2101 Advanced Microbiology (See note d)15No
CSC2004 Medical Genetics (See note a)15No
CSC2005 Introduction to Pharmacology 15No
CSC2007 Introduction to Health Research (See note c)15No
CSC2008 Immunopathology (See notes a,b)15No
CSC2009 Anatomical Sciences (See note a)15No
CSC2017 Ethical Issues in Health Research (See note d)15No
CSC2020 Coding for Medical Scientists (See note d)15No
CSC2025 Decolonising Medicine, An Introduction (See note c)15No
CSC2026 The Biology of Cancer (See note d)15No
CSC2027 Experimental Pharmacology (See note e)15No
NEU1006 Introduction to Neuroscience (See note e)15No

Stage 3


The Professional Training Year (PTY) provides you with an excellent opportunity to gain invaluable experience of working as part of a cutting edge research team. This gives you the chance to discover what it is like to work in a real research laboratory and will enhance your career prospects. You may even get the opportunity to attend a national or international science conference to present your research data, or may get your name on a research paper. Undertaking a PTY placement will enhance your professionalism, independence and confidence; increase your subject knowledge and research skills; improve your problem-solving, team-working, leadership, communication and project management skills; and prepare you for working in a professional work environment.

Our students have been awarded prestigious placements in major pharmaceutical companies, such as AstraZeneca and Pfizer. Placements with these companies are open to all UK undergraduates, and our students are closely supported by us throughout their application. In the past, students have completed research projects at the following institutions (for indicative purposes only):

• Research laboratories within the NHS

• Harvard Medical School (USA)

• Johns Hopkins University (USA)

• University of California (USA)

• Public Health England

• BTG plc

• Universities of London (King’s College, Imperial), Exeter, Plymouth and Southampton

Students who are not successful in securing a PTY placement or who would like to only study for three years, will continue directly from the second year into the final year of the programme.

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
CSC3003 Professional Training Year 120Yes

Stage 4


Compulsory Modules

In your final year you have opportunities to study cutting-edge science and undertake research to help improve current human and medical knowledge and practice. In addition to the core modules, you can select from a wide range of optional specialist advanced modules, enabling you to tailor your degree to match your own specific interests and career ambitions.

You’ll look at authentic and complex clinical case scenarios and, working as a team, you’ll apply evidence-based scientific theory and explore and critically evaluate emerging health technologies to help improve patient health. During this stage, you will either undertake a clinical/medical research project, or a scholarly review closely supervised by an expert research professional as part of the module CSC3028 (Medical Sciences Literature Review) or CSC3029 (Medical Sciences Research Project).  When following a pathway, you must complete a project or scholarly review that directly relates to your specialism.  Projects and Dissertations do not automatically relate to the named specialisms. Your Project counts towards a named Pathway and you must, therefore, take one that has been designated as such.

You’ll also complete your Personal Development and Professionalism Portfolio. Support will be provided by the Academic Lead for Careers and Employability to help you consider your career options and help consolidate your CV and interview technique. This and related activities are managed within the core non-credit bearing modules, Academic Tutor Group and Employability (CSC3909 and CSC3905).

Your choice of modules for Stage 4 will depend on your choice of core programme or pathway programme.  Please remember that the requirements of any pathway comprises modules for the core BSc (Hons) Medical Sciences, plus at least 45 credits from specialist pathway modules at stages 2 and 4, as outlined in this document, including any core pathway modules. In addition, the core 45-credit final year Project, CSC3028 (Medical Sciences Literature Review) or CSC3029 (Medical Sciences Research Project) on a subject specific to the pathway will be taken. The total credit load for each pathway, therefore, is at least 90. 

Specialist designation of all modules, projects, dissertations etc. will be confirmed by the Medical School and may be granted, withdrawn or amended by accordingly.

Specific guidance for Stage 4 is provided, below:

If you wish to continue on the core programme, BSc (Hons) Medical Sciences with PTY, you are required to complete 120 credits, made up of 30 credits of compulsory modules (see table 3), 45 credits of either CSC3028 or CSC3029, and 45 credits of optional modules and from modules developed and advertised annually on the Medical Sciences webpages.  Enrolment on optional modules will be conditional on your having completed any required prerequisite modules at Stages One and Two. The full list of Stage 4 modules are outlined in Table 4, below:

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
CSC3019 Translational Medical Science 30No

Optional Modules

a You must take one of these modules. You will initially be allocated to CSC3028, then transferred onto CSC3029 if appropriate following the project allocation process.

b  If you  took CSC2008 (Immunopathology) in second year are not permitted to take BIO3078 (Cellular Basis of Immunity) in final year.

c You may only take one of these two optional modules: CSC3018 Health Economics and BIO3086 Cell Biology of Disease

d You may only take one of these two optional modules: CSC3009 Pharmacogenomics and BIO3078 Cellular Basis of Immunity

e You may only take one of these two optional modules: NEU2019 Neuropharmacology and BIO3079 Molecular Basis of Infection

f You may only take one of these two optional modules: CSC3030 New Therapeutic Targets in Cancer and CSC3031 Applied Data Science

g You may only take one of these two optional modules: NEU3003 Psychology Applied to Health and BIO3041 Pharmacology and Medicinal Chemistry

h You may only take one of these three optional modules: CSC3010 Rational Drug Design, CSC3021 Rehabilitation Science and BIO3092 Bioinformatics

i You may only take one of these three optional modules: CSC3011 Medical Genomics, CSC3008 Clinical Trials and NEU3030 Neuroimmunology

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
CSC3028 Medical Sciences Literature Review (See note a)45No
CSC3029 Medical Sciences Research Project (See note a)45No
BIO3041 Pharmacology and Medicinal Chemistry (See note g)15No
BIO3078 Cellular Basis of Immunity (See notes b,d)15No
BIO3079 Molecular Basis of Infection (See note e)15No
BIO3086 Cell Biology of Disease (See note c)15No
BIO3092 Bioinformatics (See note h)15No
CSC3008 Clinical Trials (See note i)15No
CSC3009 Pharmacogenomics (See note d)15No
CSC3010 Rational Drug Design (See note h)15No
CSC3011 Medical Genomics (See note i)15No
CSC3018 Health Economics (See note c)15No
CSC3021 Rehabilitation Science (See note h)15No
CSC3030 New Therapeutic Targets in Cancer (See note f)15No
CSC3031 Applied Data Science (See note f)15No
NEU2019 Neuropharmacology (See note e)15No
NEU2018 Neural Circuits 15No
NEU3003 Psychology Applied to Health (See note g)15No
NEU3030 Neuroimmunology (See note i)15No

6. Programme Outcomes Linked to Teaching, Learning and Assessment Methods

Intended Learning Outcomes
A: Specialised Subject Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

1. Describe and apply to practical environments, in an integrated and interdisciplinary manner, the core biomolecular, biomedical, and biopsychosocial principles underpinning human health and important diseases.
2. Demonstrate competence in key biomedical and medical science techniques, underpinned by key clinical and medical methods at the standard expected of a graduate-level employee.
3. Apply and evaluate the key principles underpinning basic and applied medical research (including the ability to critically appraise different research strategies).
4. Synthesise and successfully apply the principles of the contemporary theoretical, cultural, ethical, and regulatory basis of basic and applied medical and clinical research practice within the UK and wider global community contexts, including any sub-specialisation named in brackets in the degree title.

Structured small group learning sessions; lectures; practical laboratory classes; seminars and workshops; experiential placements; research project or dissertation; independent study, and personal tutor feedback

ILOs 1-4 will be tested across the core and optional module formative and summative assessment, including essay examinations, short answer and multiple choice tests, written reviews, practical work and projects, quantitative problems, project report/dissertation, oral and poster presentations; project supervisor judgements, and reflective portfolio analyses.

Intended Learning Outcomes
B: Academic Discipline Core Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

5. Apply skills of critical thinking, problem- formulation, problem-solving, and rigorous scientific data handling to clinical science practice
6. Critically analyse the key medical science and public health principles underpinning the prevention, diagnosis, and clinical management of important illnesses and diseases
7. Describe and evaluate the key principles and challenges for healthcare planning and delivery, including the development and implementation of new health technologies
8. Describe and evaluate key human-environment science principles associated with human health, illness and disease.
9. Assess and apply the expected performance standards in relation to scientific probity, multidisciplinary team-based practice, and recognise personal levels of professional scientific competence

Structured small group learning sessions; lectures; practical laboratory classes; experiential placements; research project or dissertation; independent study and personal tutor feedback.

ILOs 5-9 will be tested across the core and optional module formative and summative assessment, including essay examinations, short answer and multiple choice tests, written reviews, practical work and projects, quantitative problems, project report/dissertation, oral and poster presentations; project supervisor judgements, and reflective portfolio analyses.

ILO 9 will also be assessed using peer and facilitator (personal development and professionalism) PDP judgements in small group sessions, portfolio reflection, and question and answer sessions.

Intended Learning Outcomes
C: Personal/Transferable/Employment Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

10. Identify, describe and apply effective and competent communication methods that will maximise professional relationships with patients, healthcare professionals, professional training placement teams, and lay audiences
11. Manage time, work load, ambiguity, change, and stress effectively
12. Manage and reflect on a process of personal development planning, based on self-awareness.
13. Reflect on personal leadership and management attributes and apply these in the workplace.

Structured small group learning sessions; lectures; practical laboratory classes; experiential placements; research project or dissertation; independent study and personal tutor feedback

ILOs 10-13 will be tested across the core and optional module formative and summative assessment, including essay examinations, short answer and multiple choice tests, written reviews, practical work and projects, quantitative problems, project report/dissertation, oral and poster presentations; project supervisor judgements, and reflective portfolio analyses.

7. Programme Regulations

Credit 

The programme consists of 480 credits with 120 credits taken at each stage.

  Progression

Condonement is the process that allows you to be awarded credit (and so progress to the next stage or, in the final stage, receive an award), despite failing to achieve a pass mark at a first attempt. You are not entitled to reassessment in condoned credit.

Up to 30 credits of failure can be condoned in a stage on the following conditions:

  1. You must have registered for and participated in modules amounting to at least 120 credits in the stage.
  2. You must pass the modules marked with a 'Yes' in the 'non-condonable' column in the tables above.
  3. You must achieve an average mark of at least 40% across the full 120 credits of assessment in the stage, including any failed and condoned modules.

 

Assessment and Awards

Assessment at stage one does not contribute to the summative classification of the award. The award will normally be based on the degree mark formed from the credit weighted average marks for stages 2, 3 and 4 combined in the ratio 2:1:4respectively.

Classification

The marking of modules and the classification of awards broadly corresponds to the following marks:

Undergraduate Degrees                                         

Class I    70% +                                                        

Class II   Division I 60-69%                                       

Class II   Division II 50-59%                                      

Class III  40-49%

 

Full details of assessment regulations for UG programmes and PGT programmes assessment regulations can be found in the Teaching Quality Assurance Manual (TQA) on the University of Exeter website. Generic marking criteria are also published here.

 

Please see the Teaching and Quality Assurance Manual for further guidance. 

Classification

Full details of assessment regulations for all taught programmes can be found in the TQA Manual, specifically in the Credit and Qualifications Framework, and the Assessment, Progression and Awarding: Taught Programmes Handbook. Additional information, including Generic Marking Criteria, can be found in the Learning and Teaching Support Handbook.

8. College Support for Students and Students' Learning

Academic tutoring: It is University policy that all Faculties should have in place a system of academic tutors. The role of academic tutors is to support you on individual modulesyou can also make an appointment to see individual teaching staff.

At the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, your performance in assessment is formally reviewed each term to ensure that any problems that you may be experiencing with your learning can be identified early. We seek to support students whose performance may be a cause for concern. If you need support you will be referred to trained staff and receive a confidential report containing recommendations on how changes to individual learning styles, techniques, assessment strategies and attitude to work may improve performance. All students are allocated an Academic Tutor who oversees your academic progress and personal and professional development. Your tutor is the first point of contact for academic support for the duration of the programme. You will change tutors each year. We offer a friendly and supportive environment from your first day with us. Our Wellfare team can provide assistance with non-academic issues.

Student Support: The University of Exeter Medical School offers its students a one-stop shop for all student queries, assessment submissions and concerns. Staff at the Information Point are able to make referrals for students to a wide-range of Faculty and University student support services. The Information Point is based at Info at St Luke’s on  St Luke’s Campus. Support staff are also available to answer student queries and to make referrals at all of our student reception points across all of our locations in the South-West. You can contact the Information Point by telephone on 01392 724837or by email info.stlukes@exeter.ac.uk

Students who are experiencing personal or health difficulties should, in the first instance, seek advice from the Education Welfare Advisors and Offices who are based in the Information Point. Appointments can be made at the Information Point reception, or by emailing welfare.stlukes@exeter.ac.uk

Student/Staff Liaison Committee enables students & staff to jointly participate in the management and review of the teaching and learning provision.

Careers Advice: Programme specific careers advice and guidance can be sought from the Academic Leads for Employability and Careers Dr David MacDonald (D.C.Macdonald@exeter.ac.uk) and Dr Daniela Souto Patinha (D.Patinha@exeter.ac.uk). 

9. University Support for Students and Students' Learning

Please refer to the University Academic Policy and Standards guidelines regarding support for students and students' learning.

10. Admissions Criteria

Undergraduate applicants must satisfy the Undergraduate Admissions Policy of the University of Exeter.

Postgraduate applicants must satisfy the Postgraduate Admissions Policy of the University of Exeter.

Specific requirements required to enrol on this programme are available at the respective Undergraduate or Postgraduate Study Site webpages.

11. Regulation of Assessment and Academic Standards

Each academic programme in the University is subject to an agreed College assessment and marking strategy, underpinned by institution-wide assessment procedures.

The security of assessment and academic standards is further supported through the appointment of External Examiners for each programme. External Examiners have access to draft papers, course work and examination scripts. They are required to attend the Board of Examiners and to provide an annual report. Annual External Examiner reports are monitored at both College and University level. Their responsibilities are described in the University's code of practice. See the University's TQA Manual for details.

(Quality Review Framework.

14. Awarding Institution

University of Exeter

15. Lead College / Teaching Institution

Faculty of Health and Life Sciences

16. Partner College / Institution

Partner College(s)

Not applicable to this programme

Partner Institution

College of Life and Environmental Sciences

17. Programme Accredited / Validated by

0

18. Final Award

BSc (Hons) Medical Sciences with Professional Training Year

19. UCAS Code

B101

20. NQF Level of Final Award

6 (Honours)

21. Credit

CATS credits

480

ECTS credits

240

22. QAA Subject Benchmarking Group

Not applicable

23. Dates

Origin Date Date of last revision

08/03/2023