Frequently asked questions - Examinations, Assessments, Progression and Awarding

Studyzone

Student Services remain open and available to support you as you prepare for summer exams and assessments. Please access the Studyzone for guidance and support on revising and undertaking your examinations this year.

You can view your examination timetable at https://mytimetable.exeter.ac.uk

Frequently asked questions

The frequently asked questions are arranged in the following themes:

The No Detriment Policy | Understanding Your Results | Exam and Assessment Procedures and Marking | Mitigation (Deferrals and Extensions) | Student Support

Table of Terms

TermMeaningFurther information
Ref/Def Referred or deferred, the August examination period is often called ‘Ref/Def’ Examination: Undergraduate and Postgraduate Taught students
Credit Credit is awarded to a learner on successful completion of a module Teaching Quality Assurance Manual - Definitions
Academic Stage The sub-division of a programme of study into major steps of progression; stages are commonly consistent with academic years. Each stage provides a coherent learning experience and may be recognised with an interim exit award. Normally, modules within a stage will be at the same level, but modules at different levels may be taken within the same stage, as specified in the programme specification. Teaching Quality Assurance Manual - Definitions
APAC Body required to consider every examination for a degree, diploma, certificate or other award of the University of Exeter Assessment, Progression and Awarding Committees
Core ELE Access for Option 3 Ref/Def examination papers and in class tests, multiple choice quizzes or oral examination questions being run by your College (https://vle.exeter.ac.uk)
ELE for Revision Access for all materials relating to referred or deferred assessments ELE for Revision
ELE for Examinations Access for all option 1 and 2 ref/def examination papers ELE for Examinations
BART Submission system for all referred/deferred examinations (all types) and coursework http://bart.exeter.ac.uk/

 

1. The No Detriment Policy

If you are unable to find the answers you require in these FAQs, please contact coronavirusenquiries@exeter.ac.uk in the first instance.

The No Detriment Policy (.pdf) includes all assessments submitted in the 19/20 academic year, including referred or deferred assessments and postgraduate dissertations.

We have now published the No Detriment policy in full online, here. You will see that this is a complex policy, which has taken time to develop and is not always simple to explain, but we have published it in full to give you transparency on how we will calculate your benchmark, and how this will be used as the basis of your ‘safety net’.

The benchmark calculation will look at your academic stage marks achieved before 15th March, when the coronavirus caused disruption to all of us.

Please note that some programmes subject to professional, statutory or regulatory body requirements may not be permitted to apply the no detriment policy. If this is the case students will be communicated with separately by their respective College.

The key principles of the policy are summarised as follows; please refer to the policy document for further elaboration:

The benchmark will be based on actual achievement up to 15th March from the current academic stage as far as possible.
• In order for the benchmark to be reliable, it will be based on a mean mark derived from sufficient credit (equivalent to half the total credits of the relevant stage; a stage equates to an academic year for full-time students).
• If insufficient credit has been accumulated in the current stage, achievement in the previous University of Exeter-based stage will be included within the calculation.
• If there was no prior University of Exeter-based stage, then the benchmark will be provisional until, in the case of first-year Undergraduates or Postgraduate Taught students (PGTs), sufficient credit has been accumulated to confirm the benchmark.
• The benchmark will be calculated and applied after all other normal assessment processes have been completed (e.g. condonement, mitigation, scaling, and late penalties). Please see the relevant policies for further details.
• For students who pass the current stage during 19/20 academic year, the credit-weighted mean for all assessments contributing to the stage (academic year for full-time students) will be compared to the benchmark, and the higher of these two results will be used as their overall result for the stage.

The student transcript will be annotated to reflect this policy. Dr Gihan Marasingha (Mathematics) has kindly produced two useful videos to guide you through estimating your benchmark.

The first video summarises the key points of the policy, and the calculations for undergraduate students, where they either have sufficient credit this year for a benchmark to be calculated, or where a credit from a previous Exeter-based stage can be used to make up a shortfall in credits this year.

The second video covers the cases of postgraduate taught students, and students for whom it is not possible to use credit from a previous Exeter-based stage to contribute to a benchmark (i.e. first-year undergraduates).

 

The No Detriment Policy may seem complex (although at its heart it is fairly simple) and, therefore, we want to provide you with some hypothetical examples to illustrate how it will work.

These are some undergraduate examples for a typical 3 year programme in which the final year mark has a weighting of 2 and the second year a weighting of 1 in the degree classification calculation.

Results ProgrammeWhat the benchmark means for you

Finalists

I have got consistent 2.1 marks in my second year and final year UG three year programme in which the final year mark has a weighting of 2 and the second year a weighting of 1 in the degree classification calculation You don’t need to worry about calculating the benchmark because it will be in the 2.1 class and, when combined with your 2.1 performance in the 2nd year, your degree mark will be in the 2.1 degree class as long as you complete and pass the year and are not subject to academic misconduct penalties
I have got consistent 1st class marks in my second year and final year UG three year programme in which the final year mark has a weighting of 2 and the second year a weighting of 1 in the degree classification calculation You don’t need to worry about calculating the benchmark because it will be in the 1st class and, when combined with your 1st class performance in the 2nd year, your degree mark will be in the 1st class as long as you complete and pass the year and are not subject to academic misconduct penalties
I have a stage mean of 68 for the second year, and completed 25% of my final year credits by 15th March with a mean (weighted by credits) of 75 UG three year programme in which the final year mark has a weighting of 2 and the second year a weighting of 1 in the degree classification calculation Your benchmark for the final year is 71.5 [(68 * 0.5) + (75 * 0.25 * 2)]. If you don’t improve on the benchmark, your degree mark will be in the 1st class [(68 + 71.5 + 71.5)/3 = 70.3] as long as you complete and pass the year and are not subject to academic misconduct penalties
I have a stage mean of 58 for the second year, and have completed 50% of my final year credits by 15th March with a mean (weighted by credits) of 65 UG three year programme in which the final year mark has a weighting of 2 and the second year a weighting of 1 in the degree classification calculation Your benchmark for the final year is 65 (you have completed enough credits). If you don’t improve on the benchmark, your degree mark will be in the 2.1 class [(58 + 65 + 65)/3 = 62.7] as long as you complete and pass the year and are not subject to academic misconduct penalties
I know I am borderline, have a stage mean of 68 for the second year and have completed 50% of my final year credits with a mean (weighted by credits) of 71 UG three year programme in which the final year mark has a weighting of 2 and the second year a weighting of 1 in the degree classification calculation Your benchmark for the final year is 71 (you have completed enough credits). If you don’t improve on the benchmark, your degree mark will be in the 1st class [(68 + 71 + 71)/3 = 70] as long as you complete and pass the year and are not subject to academic misconduct penalties
I know I am on the 2.1 borderline; I have a stage mean of 58 for the second year and have completed 25% of my final year credits by 15th March with a mean (weighted by credits) of 60 UG three year programme in which the final year mark has a weighting of 2 and the second year a weighting of 1 in the degree classification calculation Your benchmark for the final year is 59 [(58 * 0.5) + (60 * 0.25 * 2)]. You are still borderline and on these marks, if you don’t improve on the benchmark, your degree mark will be in the 2.2 class [(58 + 59 + 59)/3 = 58.7] as long as you complete and pass the year and are not subject to academic misconduct penalties. However, remember the benchmark is a safety-net and you have a lot of summer assessments in which to achieve the improvement you are looking for. Furthermore, exam boards (APACs) always look carefully at borderline candidates and, naturally, will give these special focus this year given the exceptional circumstances

Second year students

I have a stage mean of 55 for the 1st year but have completed 50% of my second year credits by 15th March with a mean (weighted by credits) of 65 UG three year programme in which the final year mark has a weighting of 2 and the second year a weighting of 1 in the degree classification calculation Your benchmark for the second year is 65 (you have completed enough credits). If you don’t improve on the benchmark, your stage mark will be 65 as long as you complete and pass the year and are not subject to academic misconduct penalties
I have a stage mean of 55 for the 1st year and have completed 25% of my second year credits by 15th March with a mean (weighted by credits) of 65 UG three year programme in which the final year mark has a weighting of 2 and the second year a weighting of 1 in the degree classification calculation Your benchmark for the second year is 60 [(55 * 0.5) + (65 * 0.25 * 2)]. Of course, you can still improve on this in the summer assessments as you have several to come and once you have a full set of second year marks, we don’t need to use the 1st year marks. However, if you don’t improve on the benchmark, your stage mark will still be in the 2.1 class because it will be set to your benchmark as long as you complete and pass the year and are not subject to academic misconduct penalties

First year students

I have completed 35% of my first year credits with a mean (weighted by credits) of 65 UG three year programme in which the final year mark has a weighting of 2 and the second year a weighting of 1 in the degree classification calculation You have a provisional benchmark of 65. It is provisional because you haven’t completed 50% of your credits. The June APAC will look at your performance in the summer assessment and as long as it is close to your provisional benchmark they will set your overall stage result at whichever is higher, your credit-weighted mean for the year (stage) or your provisional benchmark. This is all so long as you complete and pass the year and are not subject to academic misconduct penalties. If the APAC considers that performance between March and June is significantly lower than the provisional benchmark they have discretion to set your overall stage result at a mark lower than the provisional benchmark; if they do, you will be provided with the justification for this decision

Postgraduate programmes are more complicated but here are 2 examples for a typical 1 year programme:

I am a postgraduate student and I have completed 35% of my credits with a mean (weighted by credits) of 55, I will complete another 35% of credits by June and submit my dissertation, which is worth 30% of my credits, in September; what does it mean for me?

• You have a provisional benchmark of 55. It is provisional because you haven’t completed 50% of your credits. The June APAC will look at your performance in the summer assessment, by which time you will have completed more than 50% of your credits. As long as your performance between March and June is close to the provisional benchmark they will set your firm benchmark at whichever is higher, your credit-weighted mean for the year up to that point or your provisional benchmark as long as you are not subject to academic misconduct penalties. If the APAC considers that performance between March and June is significantly lower than the provisional benchmark they have discretion to set the firm benchmark lower than the provisional benchmark. However, if they do so, you will be provided with the justification for this decision.
• When you have completed your dissertation, as long as you have completed and passed the year and are not subject to academic misconduct penalties, your degree mark will be set to whichever is higher, your credit-weighted mean for the whole year or your firm benchmark.

I am a postgraduate student and I have completed 50% of my credits with a mean (weighted by credits) of 65, I will complete another 20% of credits by June and submit my dissertation, which is worth 30% of my credits, in September; what does it mean for me?

• You have a benchmark of 65. The June APAC will compare your credit-weighted mean for the year (stage), based on all your assessments to that point, with the benchmark. As long as you are not subject to academic misconduct penalties, if your credit-weighted mean is higher than your benchmark the exam board will increase your benchmark to your new, higher credit-weighted mean mark; otherwise your benchmark will be unchanged.
• When you have completed your dissertation, as long as you have completed and passed the year and are not subject to academic misconduct penalties, your degree mark will be set to whichever is higher, your credit-weighted mean for the whole year or your benchmark.

We hope that these examples help you understand and gain assurance about the way that we are seeking to support you to succeed.

If you have submitted all assessments in a module prior to March 15th then you have achieved all credits available for that module. This means that a 30 credit module where you have completed all your assessments prior to March 15th contributes 30 credits towards your benchmark.

Any assessment that you have submitted this year prior to March 15th contributes to your benchmark. Even if you have not completed all assessments in that module.

You can calculate how many credits an assessment is worth using the total Credit weight of that module. Express the percentage of the assessment weighting as a decimal and multiply that by the total credit weighting of the module.

For example if you completed an essay worth 40% of a 30 Credit module (0.4*30 = 12) it is worth 12 credits.

The No Detriment Policy allows a benchmark to be calculated for the majority of students, and this provides a safety-net in terms of student performance.

We are aware that in some cases (e.g. where students do not have prior University of Exeter-based study at a prior stage, and have deferred some or all of their assessments during 19/20 beyond March 15th 2020) it will not be possible to create a benchmark.

In those exceptional cases, the exam boards, also known as the Assessment, Progression and Awarding Committees (APACs) will closely scrutinise individual student profiles and use all of their existing powers to make individual adjustments to student outcomes as appropriate to mitigate the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Since publishing full details of the No Detriment Policy we have received queries from some finalists regarding the use of marks from study or work abroad, or industrial placements, in the calculation of the ‘safety net’ benchmark. Having reviewed this aspect of our policy, with a focus on giving these students as much security with respect to marks as others, we have revised our approach as follows:

Previously, the policy specified that for students who had completed less than half of their stage credits through assessments submitted on or prior to 15th March 2020, we would use all of their 19/20 credits (double weighted) and, where possible, we would make up the remaining credits necessary to calculate a benchmark by using their credit-weighted mean mark for the last academic stage studied at the University of Exeter. This meant that for those finalists who had studied abroad or undertaken a placement last year, we would not use the credit-weighted mark for this year abroad or placement in the calculation of the benchmark. Instead, we would use the credit-weighted mean mark from their last Exeter-based year of study (usually the second year).

Under the amended policy, under circumstances in which insufficient credits have been completed in 19/20 to create a benchmark for students who studied abroad or undertook placements in the preceding stage, the remaining credits will be derived from the credit-weighted mean marks for the preceding academic stages. These marks will be used with the same relative weighting for the study abroad year as is used in degree classification calculations. We believe that this approach recognises the importance of credits gained through ‘years out’ (i.e. any form of study outside the University), while recognising the variability between programmes and placements, and also ensuring consistency with our existing policies regarding the weighting of academic stages.

In all cases the ‘year out’ will be factored into the benchmark calculation such that it is consistent with our usual method for calculating degree classifications. The information provided here is by way of an example which covers the majority of cases. The precise formula for this varies between programmes (such as where the ‘year out’ does not take place in the 3rd year of a 4 year programme, or for 5-year integrated Master’s programmes). You can find details of degree classification weightings in the Teaching Quality Assurance Manual here under 9.2 and 9.8.

As an example:

Consider a student in the 4th year of a 4-year programme, who spent the 3rd year abroad and who has completed 30 credits (of the required 60 credits for benchmark calculation) in 19/20 academic year prior to 15th March.

They are on a programme where the weighting of marks used in degree classification for years 2, 3 and 4 is: 2:1:4.

Their benchmark can be estimated as follows:

Benchmark=([(M4*30)+(M3*10)+(M2*20)])/60
Or
Benchmark=[(M4*1/2)+(M3*1/6)+(M2*1/3)]

Where :

M4 = credit-weighted mean of marks gained in 19/20 academic year before 15th March
M3 = credit-weighted mean of marks in year 3 (study abroad)
M2 = credit-weighted mean of marks in year 2

In cases where a student’s final weighted mark is very close to the boundary for the higher award classification we use a calculation method called preponderance.

For example, a student achieving a final weighted mark greater than or equal to 59.50% will qualify for an upper second class honours award (2:1).

However, if a student had a final weighted mark greater than or equal to 58.00% but at least half of their stage weighted marks were greater than or equal to 60%, they would also qualify for an upper second class honours award as this demonstrates that they have been performing at the upper second class (2:1) level.

These principles apply to the undergraduate boundaries for lower second class honours awards, upper second class honours awards and first class honours awards, as well as to the boundaries for awards of merit and distinction relating to Taught Postgraduate awards. These calculations only take place at the end of the final year of study when all module grades have been agreed; it will not be used to calculate year averages for earlier stages.

For more detail on preponderance and classification of awards, please visit the Assessment, Progression and Awarding: Handbook for Taught programmes.

Yes, preponderance will still apply, taking into account all the stage weighted credits, not just those used to calculate the benchmark.

Under the No Detriment Policy, if your benchmark is higher than your final award calculation, your benchmark will supersede this and will be used for preponderance calculations.

No, preponderance is only calculated at the end of the final year of study, when all module marks have been agreed. It will not be used to calculate year averages for earlier stages.

If you are an Exeter student who is currently undertaking study abroad, then the safety net policy will apply. However, there are a couple of differences in how this can apply:

• The cut-off date for calculating your benchmark is different, in light of the earlier disruption experienced by students who were overseas this term. Your benchmark will be calculated based on all work that you submitted for your host university's first semester.
• If you have not already completed 60 credits this academic year, then we will make up the remaining credits (up to the total of 60) using the credit-weighted average from your previous Exeter-based year of study. This is the same as for all other students. For Modern Languages students, please see the specific FAQ below.
• Where you have been provided with alternative assessments, either by Exeter or by your host institution, we recommend that you attempt these assessments as you may be able to improve upon your benchmark. You should have received details of alternative assessments from your module lead/department so please do get in contact with them if you have any questions.
• All students will be able to progress to next academic year based on their benchmark, and the number of credits they have completed. The only exception to this is Modern Languages where completion of sufficient credits for the year is required, as the year abroad is an integral part of the programme. Modern Languages students are already in receipt of details of their requirements. Please see below FAQ.
• Where your benchmark falls below a pass you will be able to progress but will need to move to the non-study abroad variant of your programme.
• In addition to the above and to acknowledge the additional disruption experienced by study abroad students, we will also take the events of this year into consideration when calculating your final degree classification. We will award you based on either the three year or four year stage weighted average – whichever is the higher. This will not affect your degree title.

If you are a student of a partner institution currently studying at Exeter, then the safety net will also apply. But again, there are a couple of deviations from the current policy;

• The cut-off date for calculating your benchmark will be the same as all other Exeter students, 15th March.
• In order to calculate a firm benchmark, you need to have completed 50% of the credits that you are studying with us. For example if you are studying 60 credits, you will need to have completed 30.
• Where you have not completed 50% of your credits prior to 15th March then your benchmark will be provisional.
• In the event that your benchmark is provisional, the APAC (equivalent to an exam board) will look at your performance in your remaining summer assessments and as long as it is close to your provisional benchmark they will set your overall result at whichever is higher, your credit-weighted mean for the all assessments or your provisional benchmark. If the APAC considers that performance between March and June is significantly lower than the provisional benchmark, they have discretion to set your overall stage result at a mark lower than the provisional benchmark; if they do, you will be provided with the justification for this decision.

For information about how provisional benchmarks become firm benchmarks, please see FAQ 1.16.

The principles of the safety net policy as applied to other study abroad students will apply, however as the year abroad is an integral, as opposed to optional, part of the programme for Modern Language students, the completion of alternative assessments is critical.

The Modern Languages department has put in place arrangement for these alternative assessments, and all cohorts have received communications about what is expected.

If you do have any questions about this, please contact your module lead.

If you are undertaking a short-term placement, then we are able to apply the safety net policy in the same way that we are applying to all other students. Your mark for your placement module will be covered by the safety net policy.

If you are on a year-long placement, then we cannot apply the safety net policy to your mark for this academic year as the majority of the assessment for this stage is set to take place after 15th March, and your performance in previous stages of study are not equivalent to the learning gained whilst on placement. This will however not impact your progression to your final stage. However, where you have not passed the year, you will be placed on the three year variant of your programme.

In order to take account of the impact that Covid-19 may have had on your performance, we will instead look to mitigate this impact when considering your final degree classification. We will award you based on either the three-year or four-year stage weighted average – whichever is higher. This will not affect your degree title.

For Modern Languages students, the department has put in place arrangement for alternative assessments, and all cohorts have received communications about what is expected. If you have not yet heard anything, please contact your module lead or the ELE page for further information.

Along with other Russell Group universities, we are doing everything we can to make the case to professional bodies to be as accommodating as possible under these circumstances. Please note that in some circumstances programmes subject to professional, statutory or regulatory requirements may not be permitted to apply the No Detriment Policy because of the standards of professional competency that must be evidenced. If this is the case you will be communicated with separately by your College.

In relation to the No Detriment Policy, the University and colleagues from the Exeter INTO Centre have reviewed the curriculum of International Year One (IYO) programmes. These courses are specifically designed to match the University’s own first year programmes; they are also quality assured through University appointed external examiners, and through the University’s and INTO’s Joint Academic Boards.

For these reasons the University can have high confidence in the robustness of any marks achieved by students on IYO programmes.

Therefore the University will, where there are not enough pre-March 15th assessment credits for the current stage to determine the safety net benchmark for an individual student, the University will use the marks achieved on their INTO IYO stage in combination with their current stage pre-March 15th assessment credits.

This is only possible due to the close nature of the relationship between the University and the Exeter INTO Centre, and cannot be applied to other partners or INTO Centres, as the University is not as involved in the design and delivery of the curriculum.

The No Detriment policy cannot be applied until students have completed and passed their academic stage. Where you have not completed your academic stage by the end of 2019/20, the impact of the Covid-19 global pandemic on your results will be reviewed at a later point in your programme, once you have completed your current academic stage.

The final exam board (APAC) of your academic stage will apply the benchmark to assessments completed in the Covid-19 impacted period between 15th March 2020 and the end of September 2020.

An example of how this will work in practice is below:

• An undergraduate student has not yet completed any assessments in Stage 3.
• The student achieved a mean of 55% in Stage 2 – so their benchmark is 55%. (This will be referred to as a partial benchmark.)
• The student has 50% of their stage credits being assessed in summer 2020 which will be covered by the ’No Detriment’ policy, and associated benchmark. They achieve a mean of 51% over those credits.
• The student will then undertake 50% of their credits during 2020/21. They achieve a mean of 65% over those credits.
Their Stage 3 mean would be calculated as follows:
• 0.5 x 55% (i.e. the credits covered by the ‘No Detriment’ policy and benchmark) + 0.5 x 65% (i.e. the credits achieved in 2020/21) = 60% mean for the stage.

Where you do not have enough credit completed prior to 15th March 2020 to have a firm benchmark calculated by the end of September 2020, then a future APAC will exercise other existing powers to ensure that your academic outcome is not negatively impacted by the Covid-19 crisis.

In our No Detriment policy we have stated that provisional benchmarks will become firm benchmarks at June APACs (exam boards) provided there is no ‘significant difference’ between the provisional benchmark and the credit weighted mean including assessments completed from 15th March to June. Additional guidance has been provided here to explain how provisional benchmarks will be used and how this will be factored into final calculations.

To be clear:

1. If the credit weighted mean for the year is higher than the provisional benchmark, then the credit weighted mean for the year will be used instead of the provisional benchmark.
2. If the credit weighted mean for the year is lower than the provisional benchmark, then a formula will be applied to create a firm benchmark.

Exam boards (APACs) will use the following formula to calculate whether there is a reliable benchmark that can be used where the credit weighted mean is lower than the provisional benchmark.

Definitions:
• P = the provisional benchmark,
• A = the number of partial credits obtained up to 15 March 2020,
• M = the credit weighted mean for the stage,
• μ = A / 60 (for UG) or A / 90 (for PGT),

We compute a firm benchmark B by:

B = μ P + (1 – μ) M.

The final stage mark should be taken as the higher of B and M.

The formula interpolates between two extremes and provides a continuum. In the case where a student has attained almost no credits in the stage, the quantity μ will be close to zero, so B will be close to M (the stage credit-weighted mean, including post 15th March marks). However, if a student has attained almost 60 (or 90 for PGT students) credits, then μ will be close to 1, so B will be roughly P, the provisional benchmark (including only pre-15 March marks).

Here are some case studies to help explain this further:

1. A UG student who has completed 30% of their total 120 credits for the year by 15th March. The credits taken by 15th March gave them a provisional benchmark of 55.

After completing all of their assessments for 2019/20 they achieved an overall credit weighted mean of 56.

As this is higher than their provisional benchmark, they receive a total score for the year of 56.

2. A UG student who had completed 25% of credits by 15th March, corresponding to A = 0.25 × 120 = 30 for UG and achieved a provisional benchmark of 69.

After completing further assessments after 15th March they had a credit weighted mean of 65.

As this was lower than their provisional benchmark, a firm benchmark score would need to be applied. To ensure that the impacts of COVID-19 mitigation are taken into account and a fair score is reached, the formula will be applied (as provided above):

We compute a firm benchmark B by first computing μ = A / 60 = ½. The formula is:
B = μ P + (1 – μ) M.

In this case, B = ½ × 69 + (1 - ½) × 65 = 67.

The student achieves a firm benchmark of 67.

3. A Masters student who had completed 43% of their credits by 15th March, corresponding to A = 0.43 × 180 = 77.4 for PGT, and achieved a provisional benchmark of 68.

The remainder of their assessments were taken online after 15th March and gave them a credit weighted mean of 66.
As this was lower than their provisional benchmark, a firm benchmark score would need to be applied. To ensure that the impacts of COVID-19 mitigation are taken into account and a fair score is reached the formula will be applied. We start by computing μ = A / 90 = 0.

B = μ P + (1 – μ) M.

In this case B = 0.86 × 68 + (1 – 0.86) × 66 = 67.72.

After rounding, the student would achieve a firm benchmark of 68.

For instance this questions relates to participation marks for a seminar series that a student was unable to complete, or marks from a series of in-class tests that it hasn't been possible to finish.

Your benchmark will be calculated from complete assessment marks. Where only part of an assessment was undertaken, for instance where the assessment mark is made up of multiple components like class tests or seminar participation, these marks will not form part of the benchmark calculation as it is not possible to prejudge what the final, complete, mark may have been. 

Where an assessment has multiple submission dates, for instance for a presentation given in sequential seminar groups, these marks will not be included in the calculation unless all students have had the opportunity to submit their assessment. Therefore, if some students have submitted prior to 15th March but the remainder of their group did not have the opportunity to do so, students who have undertaken the assessment should not expect this mark to be included in their benchmark calculation.  As it was not within students’ control to schedule the timing of the assessments, factoring in these marks could create an unfair advantage or disadvantage for some members of the cohort. 

Any referred assessments will still be subject to a module result being capped at the pass mark (40 for undergraduates, 50 for postgraduate taught students).

Your benchmark will still be calculated, however any modules with a referred assessment will be subject to a cap at the pass mark, or the actual mark if that is lower.

In accordance with the No Detriment policy, passing your current stage of study is a pre-requisite for the application of your benchmark. If all your referral assessments are successfully completed, your original benchmark calculated prior to the June APACs (exam boards) will still apply at the APACs at which the results of referred modules are considered. Accordingly, the APAC will consider both your average credit-weighted mark for the stage and your benchmark and will use whichever mark is higher; decisions on your award will be made on this basis. If however you have not passed the current stage, you will not be eligible to have the benchmark applied and your average credit-weighted mark for the stage will stand.

Section A: Understanding your results

If you are unable to find the answers you require in these FAQs, please contact coronavirusenquiries@exeter.ac.uk in the first instance.

In calculating stage averages, module results are weighted according to the module’s credit value and the overall credit total for the stage.

Take the example of a standard UG student who completes 120 credits per stage:

• The Weighting is obtained by dividing the Credits Awarded for the module by 120 credits.
• The Weighted Mark is obtained by multiplying the Weighting by the Module Mark.
• The sum of all of the Weighted Marks provides the Stage Average.

In the example below:

• Module XXX1001 has a weighting of 15 credits / 120 credit total for the stage = 0.125
• 0.125 (Weighting) x 57 (module mark) = 7.13 Weighted Mark for module XXX 1001
• The sum of all Weighted Marks = 53.125, rounded to 2 decimals places = 53.13 which represents the Stage Average.

Module CodeModule MarkCredits AwardedWeightingWeighted Mark
XXX1001 57 15 0.125 7.125
XXX1002 52
15 0.125 6.5
XXX1003 47 15 0.125 5.875
XXX1004 64 15 0.125 8
XXX1005 63 15 0.125 7.875
XXX1006 71 30 0.25 17.75
         
      Stage Average 53.125 rounded to 2 decimals places = 53.13

For most PGT programmes, the stage average is defined by the overall credit requirement for the programme, i.e. 180 credits for a standard Masters, 120 credits for a Postgraduate Diploma, and 60 credits for a Postgraduate Certificate.

Looking at the example above, module XXX 1001 would have a Weighting of 15 credits / 180 overall credit requirement = 0.083.

These are listed in the University’s Teaching and Quality Assurance manual. See Academic Credit Requirements for Award for details.

The University’s Teaching and Quality Assurance Manual provides the necessary details on stage weightings and classification rules for each type of programme and degree, to enable you to determine your final credit-weighted average and degree classification.

See Classification of Awards for details.

Your benchmark will be displayed on your transcript unless you fall into one of the following categories;

• Your programme is not covered by the No Detriment Policy, such as some programmes which are accredited by professional, statutory or regulatory bodies. See FAQ 1.3 for more information.

• You are a non-finalist undergraduate Degree Apprenticeship student. See FAQ a.6 for more information.

• Your programme is covered by the No Detriment Policy, but you have not:
- passed the stage; and/or
- completed the stage.

Students are required to pass the stage in order to qualify under the No Detriment Policy for application of a benchmark, therefore if you have passed the stage you will be eligible to have a benchmark applied. The exam board (APAC) will consider whether actual achievement was higher or lower than the benchmark and if the credit-weighted average was lower, then the benchmark will have been applied and used.

Transcripts will display the average credit-weighted mark for the stage and this average will have been calculated based on marks attained from modules. These marks will have been through a number of quality assurance processes during exam board (APAC) ratification. These processes may include scaling or perhaps having penalties for academic misconduct or late submission applied. The final component and module marks may not always correspond with the benchmark or stage average you calculated in advance.

It has not been possible to calculate a benchmark for non-finalist Degree Apprenticeship students at this time due to the non-standard structure of Degree Apprenticeship programmes where stages include multiple module levels. Our standard award calculation methods are based on stages combined with levels, but the Degree Apprenticeship programmes are based solely on level and there may be more than one level per stage. Calculating a benchmark for the current stage for Degree Apprenticeship students who have studied across multiple module levels is therefore much more complex. A benchmark will however be calculated for Degree Apprenticeship students over the next few weeks and those benchmarks will be used in future award classification calculations; students will be informed once this has taken place.

PGT results will be reviewed in June in order to increase the partial benchmark or set firm benchmarks; these will be for internal use and will not be communicated to students at this time. The benchmarks will be factored into awarding at the final APAC of the programme, which for most PGT programmes takes place in the Autumn, and will be included in the calculation of the degree classification and will be displayed on the final transcript. Transcripts will display the average credit-weighted mark for the stage and this average will have been calculated based on marks attained from modules. These marks will have been through a number of quality assurance processes during exam board (APAC) ratification. These processes may include scaling or perhaps having penalties for academic misconduct or late submission applied.

2. Exam and assessment procedures and marking

All of the assessments will now be delivered online, your examination will take one of three forms:

Option 1.
An open-book non-invigilated paper that must be completed and submitted within a 24 hour period following the examination start time written on your paper and on your examination timetable.
You can use as much of the available 24 hours as you wish, but we do not expect the paper to take the full 24 hours to complete. An indicative amount of time, and/or a maximum word count(s), will be stipulated in the examination rubric.
Students will need to download, complete, and upload/submit their paper within the specified 24 hour period.

Option 2.
An open-book non-invigilated examination that must be completed and submitted within a fixed duration during a specified 24 hour period as defined on your paper and on your examination timetable.
As soon as you begin the download of your examination paper it will be time stamped, and the fixed duration of the examination will begin.
The duration will be adjusted, where appropriate, with respect to Individual Learning Plans. You are also allowed an additional 30 minute window for submission to the relevant platforms.
Please ensure you use the 30 minute window at the end of the fixed duration to upload and submit your work, contacting the Assessment Helpdesk should you have any problems during the examination.
Students will need to download, complete, and upload/submit their paper within the specified 24 hour period.

Option 3.
An extended examination to be taken over a number of weeks. Option 3 extended examinations are designed to be manageable alongside other time pressures, including other assessments.
Please be aware, during the Ref/Def assessment period you will not be able to apply for an extension to an option 3 assessment. This is because option 3 assessments are still to be treated as examinations, and therefore students will have to apply to defer should they not be able to complete the assessment in the allocated weeks.

Make sure you check the type of examination for your paper, on the examinations webpage. We will be releasing your examinations timetable via MyTimetable, on 24th July. All times are in British Summer Time (BST).

Your examination paper will be found in the following locations:

• Option 1 & 2 examination papers will only be posted on to ELE for Examinations. We will release a link to this platform shortly before the August examinations commence.
• Option 3 extended examinations, coursework, in class tests and multiple choice quizzes will be released on your module page on Core ELE at https://vle.exeter.ac.uk

Students completing Oral Examinations should read the guidance on oral examinations available online.

Please take time to read the Student Handbook for Online Examinations, which gives detailed guidance on what you need to do, what to do if things go wrong, downloading your examination, saving your completed paper, and uploading it to BART.

Your examination papers will be found in the following locations:

Option 1 & 2 examination papers will only be posted on to ELE for Examinations. We will release a link to this platform shortly before the August examinations commence.
Option 3 extended examinations, coursework, in class tests and multiple choice quizzes will be released on your module page on Core ELE
Coursework items will be released on your Core ELE module page 

Students completing oral examinations should read the guidance for the oral examinations available online, we have also published a guide on recording audio.

Please take time to read the Student Handbook for Online Examinations, which gives detailed guidance on what you need to do, what to do if things go wrong, downloading your examination, saving your completed paper, and uploading it to BART.

You can review what type of examination you will be undertaking on the examinations webpage, your personal MyTimetable will detail when an exam will become available and when it must be completed by. Make sure you note down when your exams are taking place.

If you’re taking an examination, it’s really important that you record the time you download your examination paper, track your time as you’re completing your examination, and submit it to BART before the deadline.

This is particularly important for Option 2 examinations, where your exam time will start when you click on the ‘Attempt quiz now’ button. As soon as you click on the link your start time will be logged and the duration of your exam will begin. Please make sure you are ready and have everything you need before you click on ‘Attempt quiz now’, once you click this button you will be taken to a page to download your examination paper. Please close ELE for examinations once you have downloaded your paper.

For Option 2 examinations ONLY an extra 30 minutes of additional time is provided for uploading completed examination papers to BART. You may find it useful to set a timer that will allow you plenty of time to save and submit your work to BART before your examination deadline. Please read the Student Handbook for Online Examinations for more information.

Submitting your examination and assessment paper will be different depending on what type of exam and assessment you are undertaking.

We have published a Student Handbook for Online Examinations with detailed information on submission.

When submitting your paper you will need to add a word count. If a word count is specified on your examination then please enter your final word count. If a word count is not specified, then enter zero. You don’t need to add your student number to your paper, and make sure you don’t write your name anywhere on your answer.

For Option 2 examinations, all students will be allocated an additional 30 minutes at the end of their examination period to support them with the submission process. This will be shown on the examination rubric for option 2 exams, and is in addition to any adjustments based on Individual Learning Plans (ILPs). If you encounter any technical difficulties whilst submitting your paper the extra 30 minutes should give you enough time to resolve the problem.

Please be patient, it may take a few minutes for your submission to upload to BART. If there are any issues with the system which could be affecting your ability to submit we will let you know by email on the day of your examination.

When you submit your completed examination paper to BART, you will receive a receipt notification to your University email address. This may take a few minutes to arrive if the mail server is busy. Please also check your SPAM folder if necessary.

You can also check your submission has uploaded to BART: details are in the Student Handbook for Online Examinations. If you’re still unsure, please contact your Student Hub who can check your submission.

Students who are encountering upload issues during their examination should contact the Assessments Helpdesk to receive guidance and assistance before their deadline has passed, and to ensure that the issue has been logged.

Note: You do not need to go back in to ELE to click ‘finish’ on your assessment. For Option 1 and 2 papers, ELE timestamps the start of your examination and BART records the finish time.

Students undertaking Modern Foreign Languages and Foreign Language Centre Oral Exams should read the guidance on recording audio files as well as the Oral Examinations Process Guidance.

In a small number of cases your assessment submission method may be different from BART. If this is the case, you will receive direct guidance from your College.

You do not need to submit your paper to Turnitin for the August online examinations or assessments (this includes Option 1, 2 and 3 papers).

This includes Penryn examinations. Penryn students should submit completed August examinations to BART only. All Penryn non-exam assessments (coursework items and dissertations) should be submitted using dual submission as normal.

In a small number of cases your assessment submission method may be different from BART. If this is the case, you will receive direct guidance from your College.

You should read the Student Handbook for Online Examinations, for information on how to submit your paper. The majority of papers must be uploaded to BART.

A sample of papers submitted will be uploaded to Turnitin by Education Support staff to complete plagiarism checks.

Emergency IT Loan Scheme

We are extremely aware that for some students the transition to online learning and assessment, or working from home, has introduced particular challenges due to the requirement for a suitable computer and internet connection. To address this issue, the Emergency IT Loan Scheme has been set up to mobilise a response to students who, without such help, are unable to access online learning and assessments, or continue work on research degree programmes in a home-working environment.

If you are experiencing serious difficulty or inability to access online learning and resources, and would like to apply for the Emergency IT Loan Scheme, please email a brief explanation of the IT issues you are facing and your student number to coronavirusenquiries@exeter.ac.uk

A team of colleagues will contact students who have reported issues - to discuss solutions such as the offer of funds to purchase a laptop and/or 4G mobile internet device. In most situations, this would be loan equipment to be returned to the university (or costs repaid) at a later date.

We recognise that this solution may not work in all cases, and continue to work hard to devise ways to support our students in these unprecedented times. We encourage students who have difficulties with IT hardware or internet connectivity to contact us on 01392 725000 (international: +44 300 555 0225), or on coronavirusenquiries@exeter.ac.uk

ON CAMPUS PROVISION

In August, we will be offering some limited provision of rooms on the Streatham campus, for students who have a significantly unsuitable or unsafe environment to complete their referred or deferred assessments in.

If you wish to book Exeter accommodation on the Streatham campus please visit https://event.exeter.ac.uk/stay/bed-and-breakfast

This provision is only available to students with referred or deferred assessments. You will be accommodated in a single en-suite room in Holland Hall, and your stay will be on a room only basis. We are, unfortunately, unable to offer a breakfast service.

• Your room will be available from 3pm on the day of arrival
• Your room will have been deep cleaned prior to your stay

We operate under strict COVID guidelines and all staff are fully appraised of the guidelines and practice stringent health and safety.

You must vacate your room by 10am on the day of departure, taking all belongings with you.

The accommodation on offer:

Soap, towels, coat hangers, a kettle and a small mini fridge are provided in the room. We are unable to provide such items as mugs and crockery or washing up items such as tea towels, sponges/scourers/cloths or rubber gloves.

There is a microwave, sink, rubbish and recycling facilities in the kitchens.

If you require a fresh towel during your stay these will be available from reception, which will be open from 9am to 3pm Monday to Friday.
There is a lift and on site laundry room,

Please follow all COVID-19 regulations and staff instruction when using this facility, respecting others and maintaining 2 metre distancing. Please wipe clean the microwave and all surfaces after use with the cleaning product and blue roll provided to adhere to COVID-19 requirements and to enable the next person to use the facility safely. When using the lift, you must adhere to the COVID-19 regulations displayed on the notice next to the lift.

Out of reception hours, in an emergency, please contact Estate Patrol on 01392 72 3999.

It is recommended that you wear a face mask when in public spaces both inside and outside.

All of our assessments will now be delivered online or remotely, your examination will take one of three forms:

Option 1.
An open-book non-invigilated paper that must be completed and submitted within a 24 hour period following the examination start time written on your paper and on your examination timetable.
You can use as much of the available 24 hours as you wish, but we do not expect the paper to take the full 24 hours to complete. An indicative amount of time, and/or a maximum word count(s), will be stipulated in the examination rubric.
Students will need to download, complete, and upload/submit their paper within the specified 24 hour period.

Option 2.
An open-book non-invigilated examination that must be completed and submitted within a fixed duration during a specified 24 hour period as defined on your paper and on your examination timetable.
As soon as you begin the download of your examination paper it will be time stamped, and the fixed duration of the examination will begin.
The duration will be adjusted, where appropriate, with respect to Individual Learning Plans. You are also allowed an additional 30 minute window for submission to the relevant platforms.
Please ensure you use the 30 minute window at the end of the fixed duration to upload and submit your work, contacting the Assessment Helpdesk should you have any problems during the examination.
Students will need to download, complete, and upload/submit their paper within the specified 24 hour period.

Option 3.
An extended examination to be taken over a number of weeks. Option 3 extended examinations are designed to be manageable alongside other time pressures, including other assessments.
Please be aware, during the Ref/Def assessment period you will not be able to apply for an extension to an option 3 assessment. This is because option 3 assessments are still to be treated as examinations, and therefore students will have to apply to defer should they not be able to complete the assessment in the allocated weeks.

All assessments, excluding those that will be replaced by Option 3 extended examinations, will be offered in a 24 hour period – either of no fixed duration, or a fixed duration. This will allow you to complete the exams at a suitable time, wherever you may be. The 24 hour period exists to allow all students to engage with the assessment no matter in which time zone you are living. There is no expectation that these assessments should take longer than ‘normal’ examinations.

Students can access their books and notes during an ‘open book’ exam and no invigilation is possible. No one will be marked more generously or harshly as a result of the changes to delivery. All marking will continue to comply with the University’s rigorous marking and moderation procedures that are externally scrutinised. We have also expressed our commitment to your success through the introduction of the No Detriment Policy.

All examinations will be marked in accordance with previously published assessment criteria (or equivalent criteria to reflect new assessment formats), to ensure we uphold the standard of our degrees. We will then scrutinise all of the results, both at the level of modules and individual students, to assess the impact of the extraordinary and challenging circumstances in which you have undertaken your examinations and assessments.

Given these circumstances, we have also decided to introduce the ‘safety net’ policy. We will use the concept of the safety net to do what we can to ensure that you receive an award or year average that accurately reflects your academic attainment during your time on the course unimpaired by COVID-19.

Transcripts will be annotated to explain the reported results.

Please note that in some circumstances programmes subject to professional regulation may not be permitted to apply the ‘safety net’ policy. If this is the case you will be communicated with separately by your College.

At the end of the summer examination and assessment period, all results will be scrutinised at the level of each module and of each individual student at the University’s Assessment Progression and Awarding Committees (APACs). Throughout this process, our aim is to ensure the fairness and integrity of the Exeter award, as well as to support our students through this difficult situation in a way that allows them to progress or be awarded. APACs will take place from 1 September onwards. This means you will receive your grades and outcomes from Ref/Def assessments on Monday 7 September.

The release of results from the Ref/Def assessment period is scheduled for Monday 7 September.

We work with detailed guidelines on the equivalencies between essays and exams and do not believe any student will be at a disadvantage if one or more of their assessments changes from a traditional exam type to an extended open book remote assessment. We ensure that all assessments have been designed in the context of the original intended learning outcomes for the assessment.

You also have the option to apply for a deferral of your examination or assessment if you are concerned. We urge you to carefully consider any decision to defer an assessment, as a deferral at this stage can impact your ability to progress to the next stage of your programme or complete your award. If you are an international student considering deferral please contact visaadvice@exeter.ac.uk to find out about any possible implications on your visa status. Students can also seek impartial and confidential advice from the Students’ Guild (Exeter) and Students’ Union (Cornwall). Further information on deferral can be found online.

We know that some students choose their modules depending on the type of assessment. We work with detailed guidelines on the equivalencies between essays and exams.

The Assessment, Progression and Awarding Committee considers all student performance across modules at the end of each year. The Committee will have all of your marks for assessments at its disposal, and will be considering the impact of these exceptional circumstances, including changes to assessment format.

We aim to make to make appropriate adjustments for undergraduate and taught postgraduate students who are eligible for additional specific provisions during examinations or assessments in accordance with their Individual Learning Plan (ILP). Please see question 2.16 below for details of arrangements made for students who normally receive extra time or rest breaks.

If you wish to discuss your ILP and your ability to complete the Ref/Def exams please contact us before 5pm on Friday 10th July BST in order for any additional adjustments to be considered. Even if you were granted an adjustment for the May period, please contact us again ahead of 10th July to discuss provision for Ref/Def examinations.

Exeter based students should contact Wellbeing@exeter.ac.uk for any queries related to a mental health condition, and contact Accessability@exeter.ac.uk for any queries related to any other disability or health condition. Students based in Penryn should contact Accessibility@fxplus.ac.uk.

To find out what format your remote examination will take, visit these webpages.

• For Option 1 examinations which are taken within a 24 hour time period with no fixed duration, students can take as long as they require within this 24 hour period to complete the examination. The expectation is that such papers will take approximately the same length of time as the originally-planned examinations, and thus the 24 hour time period allows for any extra time or rest breaks students would have previously taken in an invigilated exam on campus.

• If you are undertaking an Option 2 (fixed duration) examination and have an ILP requiring extra time then you can use this ILP Information table to calculate how much extra time you will be provided. You can find details of your ILP via the Student Record System here.

If you have been allocated any examinations falling under Option 2 (fixed duration), please note that you will be allocated an additional 30 minutes on top of the examination duration to support you to complete the submission process should you experience any technical difficulties. This is also in addition to any timed adjustments based on Individual Learning Plans.

• For Option 3 extended examination alternatives, no extra time or extensions will be granted. Students will usually be advised to apply for a deferral should they be unable to complete the assessment, further information can be found on the Mitigation webpages.

We will work closely with the Wellbeing Service, Disability Advisors and students on a one-to-one basis to consider any challenges arising from the change in delivery of assessments.

If you have any queries or concerns about your adjustments for the upcoming Ref/Def assessment period, you will need to make contact with the relevant service by no later than 5pm on Friday 10th July BST in order for any additional adjustments to be considered.

Exeter based students should contact Wellbeing@exeter.ac.uk for any queries related to a mental health condition, and contact Accessability@exeter.ac.uk for any queries related to any other disability or health condition. Students based in Penryn should contact Accessibility@fxplus.ac.uk.

Where circumstances still prevent you from undertaking your examinations, you have the option to request a deferral.

Guidance on the process for the oral examinations is available online, we have also published a guide on recording audio.

Should you require assistance during your oral examination, the Assessment Helpdesk will be available as a first point of contact phone (01392) 726800).

The Helpdesk is open - 8am-8pm, Monday to Saturday from 3rd August, and 8am-12.30pm on Sunday 9th and 16th August by phone on +44 (0)1392 726800 or email on exams2020@exeter.ac.uk

Humanities Modern Languages Oral examinations

The materials for Modern Languages Oral examinations will be made available from Core ELE. Your module convenor will make contact to discuss a suitable time and date for the assessment, after your examination timetable has been released on 24th July, to ensure we can avoid clashes wherever possible. Once downloaded on the specified day/24-hour period, the exam should be completed and uploaded to BART within an hour (plus any extra time specified in an ILP).

You will be required to submit an audio recording, not video, to BART. Your audio file will need to be in mp3 format.

Please find a guide on recording audio for your oral examination here.

Foreign Language Centre Oral examinations

Your Hub team will make contact to notify you of any Foreign Language Centre referred or deferred oral examination, and then your module convenor will be in touch.

You must then contact your tutor via email to discuss a suitable date and time for the assessment, which will take place via Microsoft Teams. The oral examination must take place during the August reassessment period: Monday 3rd August – Friday 21st August 2020.

Please note, if you do not contact your tutor by 31st July 2020, we will assume that you are choosing not to take the test, and a mark of 0 (zero) will be entered for this component.

All University of Exeter students have access to Teams. Please log in using your University of Exeter username and password.

The following late submission regulations have been adopted for the 2019/20 May and August assessment periods, to reflect the online delivery of examinations:

Late submissions

Option 1 examinations are to be completed and submitted within a 24 hour time window. Option 2 papers are to be completed and submitted within a ‘total fixed duration’ within a 24 hour period.

For option 1 examinations undertaken within a 24 hour window, and option 3 coursework assessments undertaken over longer time frames within the examination period:

Examination TypeReduce mark by 5%Cap at pass mark Award mark of 0%
Option 1 Up to 59 minutes and 59 seconds late 1 hour to up to 47 hours, 59 minutes and 59 seconds late More than 48 hours late
Option 3 Up to 59 minutes and 59 seconds late 1 hour to up to 47 hours, 59 minutes and 59 seconds late More than 48 hours late

Submissions exceeding the total fixed duration for an examination

For option 2 papers, it will be stipulated how much time you have to complete your paper from the moment you open the relevant link and start your examination. In addition to this specified ‘examination time’, you will also be given:

• 30 minutes of ‘technical upload time’ in which to convert your document (along with any drawings / graphs) into the correct file format (usually pdf) and submit it; and, only where applicable,
• any extra time required as a result of recommendations contained within your Individual Learning Plan (ILP).

The ‘total fixed duration’ = (i) your examination time + (ii) your technical upload time + (iii) extra time required as per an ILP (only where applicable).

The download of your examination paper and upload of your completed work within this ‘total fixed duration’ will be monitored. Students that have exceeded this total fixed duration will be penalised as follows:

Examination TypeReduce mark by 5%Cap at pass markAward mark of 0%
Option 2 Submissions that exceed the ‘total fixed duration’ by up to 14 minutes and 59 seconds late Submissions that exceed the ‘total fixed duration’ by 15 minutes to up to 29 minutes and 59 seconds late Submissions that exceed the ‘total fixed duration’ by more than 30 minutes late

Where a student submits within the total fixed duration for their examination, but after the end of the 24 hour window, then the following penalties will apply:

Examination TypeReduce mark by 5%Cap at pass mark
Option 2 Up to 59 minutes and 59 seconds late More than 1 hour late

When is work late?

Option 1 – work submitted more than 24 hours after the examination paper release time will be marked as late, and penalties will be applied.

Option 2 - work submitted after the ‘total fixed duration’ available to complete and submit the examination will be marked as late. The total fixed duration for option 2 papers consists of: (i) the examination time (as specified on your paper); (ii) the technical upload time; and, only where applicable, (iii) the additional time conferred by a students’ ILP. OR work submitted within the ‘total fixed duration’ but more than 24 hours after the examination paper release time. You should therefore make sure that you start the paper in plenty of time.

Option 3 - work is late where is has not been uploaded by the deadline, as is the case with coursework.

You can resubmit your paper within the timeframe of your examination. Please see the Student Handbook for Online Examinations for guidance on how to resubmit your paper.

If you realise you have submitted your work incorrectly, and it is not within the timeframe of your examination, you should contact the Assessment Helpdesk on +44 (0)1392 726800 as soon as possible. They will be able to advise how you can submit the correct work, and if any late penalties apply.

Students are permitted to hand write their exams, you will need a smartphone camera, digital camera or equivalent device to scan or photograph your handwritten work and then insert it into a PDF to submit to BART - full guidance is in the Student Handbook for Online Examinations.

In the event that you hand write your answers for an examination, it is your responsibility to provide a script that is clearly legible. Candidates who submit scripts which examiners are unable to read will be invited to produce a word-processed transcript. This transcript must be a true copy of the original. If any embellishments are found, this will be treated as suspected academic misconduct following guidance under Chapter 12 – Academic Conduct and Practice.

If an answer sheet is provided on the examination, you can choose to handwrite your answers on separate paper but make sure you clearly label which question you are answering.

If you experience IT issues during your exam, you must contact the Assessment Helpdesk on +44 (0)1392 726800, so they can log that the issue has occurred and give you urgent assistance.

If you experience IT issues (including internet problems) that prevent you from successfully completing your examination you can also apply for mitigation, once you have contacted the Assessment Helpdesk.

You should complete the online mitigation form within one working day of the affected assessment submission date. However, mitigation for the August 2020 examination period can only take the form of deferral to the next available assessment period. This could affect your ability to progress or complete your award for the year.

Assessment Helpdesk:

- Support available via email from 13 July, contact: exams2020@exeter.ac.uk
- Phone line available from 3 August, for urgent support requests during examinations.
  Call: +44 (0)1392 726800

Phone line opening times BST (from Monday 3 August to Sunday 16 August) 

 

- 8am to 8pm Monday to Saturday
- 8am to 12.30pm Sundays

For out of hours support, please email exams2020@exeter.ac.uk

Academic honesty is fundamental to the values promoted by the University and no student should be allowed to obtain for themselves, or for someone else, an unfair advantage as a result of academic dishonesty - whether this is by plagiarism, collusion with another, cheating, or other means. Students are expected to do their own work and abide by the University’s Code of Academic Conduct and Practice. In the process of submitting any examination paper, students will be asked to declare their acknowledgement of, and compliance with, this code.

These assessments will be subject to our normal processes for the detection of plagiarism, such as the use of plagiarism detection software. We are aware, however, that remote examinations (open book and online timed assessments) present the potential for an increase in academic misconduct, particularly around authorship issues. Due to this, the University has introduced a viva process to support academic staff in marking assignments where they have concerns over the authorship or originality of the work.

The primary purpose of the viva voce is to ascertain whether the work submitted by a student is based on their knowledge. This is achieved by assessing the student’s understanding of the submission, and their ability to explain and justify its contents using their knowledge of the subject, by way of a video interview as part of the moderation process. If there are any concerns about a submission, students will be notified and invited to attend a viva.

3. Mitigation (deferrals and extensions)

Ref/Def assessments deferred into 2020/21 need to be completed at the next available assessment opportunity - for examinations this could be January or May 2021, dependent on the scheduling of the module assessment.

If you choose to defer your Ref/Def assessments, they will take place in the next academic year 2020/21, and your ability to progress to the next stage of your programme or complete your award may be affected. In the 2020-21 academic year you will only engage with your remaining 2019/20 assessments, revision and support services - you will not be required to attend classes or be present on campus.

Students may be granted a maximum of a one-week extension for assessments due during the Ref/Def period. This is because if you have an extension beyond a certain date it is often not possible for your work to be marked, moderated and sent to an External Examiner (if applicable) before the Assessment, Progression and Awarding Committee (APAC). Find out more on our Mitigation webpages.

Unfortunately you cannot defer your assessments to the next academic year, or interrupt in order to return in the next academic year and take the assessments in their original form. This is due to the number of restrictions imposed by our partner institutions for the number of students that we can send to them per year.

If you are a student from a partner institution currently studying at Exeter, any longer-term interventions such as interruptions would need to be discussed with your home institution.

Please contact the Study Abroad team for further assistance.

From 13 July, you will be able to apply for a deferral of one or more individual assessments using the standard mitigation form, where short-lived circumstances impact on your ability to complete some assessments but not others. You can also apply for deferral should you experience technical issues or IT failure during an examination.

We urge you to carefully consider any decision to defer an assessment, as a deferral at this stage can impact your ability to progress to the next stage of your programme or complete your award. Please talk any such decision through with academic tutors, loved ones and peers. If you are an international student considering deferral please contact visaadvice@exeter.ac.uk to find out about any possible implications on your visa status. Students can also seek impartial and confidential advice from the Students’ Guild (Exeter) and Students’ Union (Cornwall).

To request a deferral please see the information on these pages.

Any student can apply for mitigation or deferral should you experience technical issues or IT failure during an examination. Requests must be received either before the examination or within one working day of sitting.

When accessing your module pages in ELE for Revision you may notice a label in the top-left corner that says ‘Not available.’ This will appear below the module title. This label does not mean there is any information missing; unfortunately this is an automatic feature we cannot disable.

You can access ELE for Revision here.

4. Student Support

In line with the Government’s latest advice, we have closed all communal areas on our campuses. This includes all libraries, study spaces and shared spaces in halls of residence. Students living on campus must study in their rooms.

In August, we will be offering some limited provision of rooms on the Streatham campus, for students who have a significantly unsuitable or unsafe environment to complete their referred or deferred assessments in.

If you wish to book Exeter accommodation on the Streatham campus please visit: https://event.exeter.ac.uk/stay/bed-and-breakfast

This provision is only available to students with referred or deferred assessments. You will be accommodated in a single en-suite room in Holland Hall, and your stay will be on a room only basis. We are, unfortunately, unable to offer a breakfast service.

Your room will be available from 3pm on the day of arrival.

Your room will have been deep cleaned prior to your stay.

We operate under strict COVID guidelines and all staff are fully appraised of the guidelines and practice stringent health and safety.

You must vacate your room by 10am on the day of departure, taking all belongings with you.

The accommodation on offer:

Soap, towels, coat hangers, a kettle and a small mini fridge are provided in the room. We are unable to provide such items as mugs and crockery or washing up items such as tea towels, sponges/scourers/cloths or rubber gloves.

There is a microwave, sink, rubbish and recycling facilities in the kitchens.

If you require a fresh towel during your stay these will be available from reception, which will be open from 9am to 3pm Monday to Friday.

There is a lift and on site laundry room. Please follow all COVID-19 regulations and staff instruction when using this facility, respecting others and maintaining 2 metre distancing. Please wipe clean the microwave and all surfaces after use with the cleaning product and blue roll provided to adhere to COVID-19 requirements and to enable the next person to use the facility safely. When using the lift, you must adhere to the COVID-19 regulations displayed on the notice next to the lift.

Out of reception hours, in an emergency, please contact Estate Patrol on 01392 72 3999.

It is recommended that you wear a face mask when in public spaces both inside and outside.

To support you as you prepare for the exams there’s lots of guidance available via the Study Zone

You can also book a 1:1 appointment with a Study Skills Adviser if you require further help with your studies or revision.

If you require assistance during your examination session, you must contact the Assessment Helpdesk:

Assessment Helpdesk:

- Support available via email from 13 July, contact: exams2020@exeter.ac.uk
- Phone line available from 3 August, for urgent support requests during examinations.
  Call: +44 (0)1392 726800

Phone line opening times BST (from Monday 3 August to Sunday 16 August)

- 8am to 8pm Monday to Saturday
- 8am to 12.30pm Sundays

For out of hours support, please email exams2020@exeter.ac.uk

‌The Helpdesk can advise on queries about the examination question or rubric, along with IT-related questions or issues during your examination, liaising directly with the IT Helpdesk if necessary. The Helpdesk are able to respond to queries on all assessments (options 1, 2 and 3) that are currently open.

The Assessment Helpdesk should only be contacted if you require assistance during an examination session itself. As you will be under examination conditions, you should not contact your module lead or another module tutor during your examination under any circumstances.

Please do not contact the Assessment Helpdesk outside of your examination window, as this will block phone lines for those sitting live examinations and who require immediate help. Instead, please refer to the Student FAQs or contact coronavirusenquiries@exeter.ac.uk.

If you have queries about your dissertation or coursework items, please speak to your relevant Hub Info point.

The Assessment Helpdesk is run by a support team able to respond to queries on all examinations (options 1, 2 and 3) whilst they are taking place and open. If you have enquiries about your dissertation or coursework please speak to your relevant Hub Info Point. The Helpdesk can advise on queries about the examination question or rubric, along with IT-related queries during your examination, liaising directly with the IT Helpdesk if necessary. They will also log that you have experienced an issue during an examination and been in touch.

Assessment Helpdesk:

- Support available via email from 13 July, contact: exams2020@exeter.ac.uk
- Phone line available from 3 August, for urgent support requests during examinations.
  Call: +44 (0)1392 726800

Phone line opening times BST (from Monday 3 August to Sunday 16 August):
- 8am to 8pm Monday to Saturday
- 8am to 12.30pm Sundays

For out of hours support, please email exams2020@exeter.ac.uk

The Assessment Helpdesk should only be contacted if you require assistance during an examination session itself. As you will be under examination conditions, you should not contact your module lead or another module tutor during your examination under any circumstances.

Please do not contact the Assessment Helpdesk outside of your examination window, as this will block phone lines for those sitting live examinations and who require immediate help. Instead, please refer to the Student FAQs or contact coronavirusenquiries@exeter.ac.uk.