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Frequently asked questions - Examinations, Assessments, Progression and Awarding

FAQs

FAQs

FAQs

FAQs

FAQs

Studyzone

Student Services are available to support you as you prepare for exams and assessments. Please access the Studyzone for guidance and support on revising and undertaking your examinations.

Frequently asked questions

The frequently asked questions are arranged in the following themes:

Exam and Assessment Procedures and Marking | Mitigation (Deferrals and Extensions) | Student Support | The No Detriment Policy | Understanding Your Results 

Table of Terms

TermMeaningFurther information
Credit Credit is awarded to a learner on successful completion of a module Teaching Quality Assurance Manual - Definitions
Academic Stage The sub-division of a programme of study into major steps of progression; stages are commonly consistent with academic years. Each stage provides a coherent learning experience and may be recognised with an interim exit award. Normally, modules within a stage will be at the same level, but modules at different levels may be taken within the same stage, as specified in the programme specification. Teaching Quality Assurance Manual - Definitions
APAC Body required to consider every examination for a degree, diploma, certificate or other award of the University of Exeter Assessment, Progression and Awarding Committees
ELE Access all of your course materials (https://vle.exeter.ac.uk)
BART Submission system for all examinations (all types) and coursework http://bart.exeter.ac.uk/

 

1. Exam and assessment procedures and marking

Our examinations and assessments will now be delivered online. We will be posting further information on the January examinations as soon as possible, which will be delivered online.

Examinations take one of three forms:

Option 1.
An open-book non-invigilated paper that must be completed and submitted within a 24 hour period following the examination start time written on your paper and on your examination timetable.

You can use as much of the available 24 hours as you wish, but we do not expect the paper to take the full 24 hours to complete. An indicative amount of time, and/or a maximum word count(s), will be stipulated in the examination rubric.

Students will need to download, complete, and upload/submit their paper within the specified 24 hour period.

Option 2.
An open-book non-invigilated examination that must be completed and submitted within a fixed duration during a specified 24 hour period as defined on your paper and on your examination timetable.

As soon as you begin the download of your examination paper it will be time stamped, and the fixed duration of the examination will begin.

The duration will be adjusted, where appropriate, with respect to Individual Learning Plans. You are also allowed an additional 30 minute window for submission to the relevant platforms.

Please ensure you use the 30 minute window at the end of the fixed duration to upload and submit your work, contacting the Assessment Helpdesk should you have any problems during the examination.

Students will need to download, complete, and upload/submit their paper within the specified 24 hour period.

Option 3.
An extended examination to be taken over a number of weeks. Option 3 extended examinations are designed to be manageable alongside other time pressures, including other assessments.

 

We will be posting further information on the January examinations later this term, including where they will be accessed from. Please keep an eye on your emails, and this webpage, for notifications.

If bringing your own computer to University is financially difficult, you can apply for funds to buy computer equipment through the University's Success for All Fund. If you are disabled and need help to buy specialist equipment, we may also be able to help. You can find out more and apply online on our website.

We will make sure you have access to any specialist software you need for your studies virtually.

Students can access their books and notes during an ‘open book’ exam and no invigilation is possible. No one will be marked more generously or harshly as a result of the changes to delivery. All marking will continue to comply with the University’s rigorous marking and moderation procedures that are externally scrutinised.

All examinations will be marked in accordance with published assessment criteria (or equivalent criteria to reflect new assessment formats), to ensure we uphold the standard of our degrees. We then scrutinise all of the results, both at the level of modules and individual students, to assess the impact of any extraordinary and challenging circumstances in which you have undertaken your examinations and assessments.

At the end of each examination and assessment period, all results are scrutinised at the level of each module and of each individual student at the University’s Assessment Progression and Awarding Committees (APACs). Throughout this process, our aim is to ensure the fairness and integrity of the Exeter award, as well as to support our students.

The 2020/1 January exams are currently scheduled to take place from Monday 4th January 2021 to Saturday 9th January 2021. We will confirm the date of results release as soon as possible.

We aim to make to make appropriate adjustments for undergraduate and taught postgraduate students who are eligible for additional specific provisions during examinations or assessments in accordance with their Individual Learning Plan (ILP). Please see question 1.9 below for details of arrangements made for students who normally receive extra time or rest breaks.

If you wish to discuss your ILP and your ability to complete the January exams please contact us before 5pm on Monday 9th November 2020 BST in order for any adjustments to be considered.

Exeter based students should contact Wellbeing@exeter.ac.uk for any queries related to a mental health condition, and contact Accessability@exeter.ac.uk for any queries related to any other disability or health condition.

Students based in Penryn should contact Accessibility@fxplus.ac.uk.

• For Option 1 examinations which are taken within a 24 hour time period with no fixed duration, students can take as long as they require within this 24 hour period to complete the examination. The expectation is that such papers will take approximately the same length of time as the originally-planned examinations, and thus the 24 hour time period allows for any extra time or rest breaks students would have previously taken in an invigilated exam on campus.

• If you are undertaking an Option 2 (fixed duration) examination and have an ILP requiring extra time then you can use this ILP Information table to calculate how much extra time you will be provided. You can find details of your ILP via the Student Record System here.

If you have been allocated any examinations falling under Option 2 (fixed duration), please note that you will be allocated an additional 30 minutes on top of the examination duration to support you to complete the submission process should you experience any technical difficulties. This is also in addition to any timed adjustments based on Individual Learning Plans.

• For Option 3 extended examination alternatives, no extra time or extensions will be granted. Students will usually be advised to apply for a deferral should they be unable to complete the assessment, further information can be found on the Mitigation webpages.

We will work closely with the Wellbeing Service, Disability Advisors and students on a one-to-one basis to consider any challenges arising from the change in delivery of assessments.

If you have any queries or concerns about your adjustments for the upcoming January assessment period, you will need to make contact with the relevant service by no later than 5pm on Monday 9th November 2020 BST in order for any additional adjustments to be considered.

Exeter based students should contact Wellbeing@exeter.ac.uk for any queries related to a mental health condition, and contact Accessability@exeter.ac.uk for any queries related to any other disability or health condition. Students based in Penryn should contact Accessibility@fxplus.ac.uk.

Where circumstances still prevent you from undertaking your examinations, you have the option to request a deferral.

Guidance on the process for the oral examinations is available online, we have also published a guide on recording audio.

Humanities Modern Languages Oral examinations

The materials for Modern Languages Oral examinations will be made available from Core ELE. Your module convenor will make contact to discuss a suitable time and date for the assessment, after your examination timetable has been released on 24th July, to ensure we can avoid clashes wherever possible. Once downloaded on the specified day/24-hour period, the exam should be completed and uploaded to BART within an hour (plus any extra time specified in an ILP).

You will be required to submit a recording to BART. Your file will need to be in mp3 or m4a format.

Please find a guide on recording audio for your oral examination here.

Foreign Language Centre Oral examinations

Foreign Language Centre Oral examinations usually take place using Microsoft Teams.

All University of Exeter students have access to Teams. Please log in using your University of Exeter username and password. We will post further detail on any specific organisation of these assessments in due course.

You can resubmit papers to BART within the timeframe of your examination. Please see the Student Handbook for Online Examinations for guidance on how to resubmit your paper.

We will post detail on what to do if you submit a January examination outside of the timeframe of an examination in due course. For other assessments, please contact your Hub info point as soon as possible.

Students are permitted to hand write their exams, you will need a smartphone camera, digital camera or equivalent device to scan or photograph your handwritten work and then insert it into a PDF to submit to BART - full guidance is in the Student Handbook for Online Examinations.

In the event that you hand write your answers for an examination, it is your responsibility to provide a script that is clearly legible. Candidates who submit scripts which examiners are unable to read will be invited to produce a word-processed transcript. This transcript must be a true copy of the original. If any embellishments are found, this will be treated as suspected academic misconduct following guidance under Chapter 12 – Academic Conduct and Practice.

If an answer sheet is provided on the examination, you can choose to handwrite your answers on separate paper but make sure you clearly label which question you are answering.

Academic honesty is fundamental to the values promoted by the University and no student should be allowed to obtain for themselves, or for someone else, an unfair advantage as a result of academic dishonesty - whether this is by plagiarism, collusion with another, cheating, or other means. Students are expected to do their own work and abide by the University’s Code of Academic Conduct and Practice. In the process of submitting any examination paper, students will be asked to declare their acknowledgement of, and compliance with, this code.

These assessments will be subject to our normal processes for the detection of plagiarism, such as the use of plagiarism detection software. We are aware, however, that remote examinations (open book and online timed assessments) present the potential for an increase in academic misconduct, particularly around authorship issues. Due to this, the University has introduced a viva process to support academic staff in marking assignments where they have concerns over the authorship or originality of the work.

The primary purpose of the viva voce is to ascertain whether the work submitted by a student is based on their knowledge. This is achieved by assessing the student’s understanding of the submission, and their ability to explain and justify its contents using their knowledge of the subject, by way of a video interview as part of the moderation process. If there are any concerns about a submission, students will be notified and invited to attend a viva.

2. Mitigation (deferrals and extensions)

Deferred January assessments need to be completed at the next available assessment opportunity - for examinations this is usually August 2021.

You can find out about how to apply for extensions to coursework, and whether or not an extension is the right option for you, on our Mitigation webpages.

You can find out about the University Mitigation procedures on these webpages.

We ask you to carefully consider any decision to apply for mitigation. Students can seek impartial and confidential advice from the Students’ Guild (Exeter) and Students’ Union (Cornwall).

We ask you to carefully consider any decision to apply for mitigation. Students can seek impartial and confidential advice from the Students’ Guild (Exeter) and Students’ Union (Cornwall).

Any student can apply for mitigation or deferral should you experience technical issues or IT failure during an examination. Requests must be received either before the examination or within one working day of sitting.

 

3. Student Support

In line with the current social distancing regulations, we are now running a booking system for on campus study spaces. To book a study space, please visit our Coming to Campus webpages.

To support you as you prepare for the exams there’s lots of guidance available via the Study Zone

You can also book a 1:1 appointment with a Study Skills Adviser if you require further help with your studies or revision.

We will post further information on the support that will be available during the January examination period in due course.

For previous examination periods we introduced the Assessment Helpdesk, further detail of the service running for January examinations will be shared as soon as possible.

If you have queries about your dissertation or coursework items, please speak to your relevant Hub Info point.

The Assessment Helpdesk is run by a support team able to respond to queries on all examinations (options 1, 2 and 3) whilst they are taking place and open. The Assessment Helpdesk is now closed, as the examination period has ended. We will post further detail on the service that will be in place for January examinations in due course.

If you have enquiries about a dissertation or coursework items please speak to your relevant Hub Info Point.

The Helpdesk can advise on queries about the examination question or rubric, along with IT-related queries during your examination, liaising directly with the IT Helpdesk if necessary. They will also log that you have experienced an issue during an examination and been in touch.

4. The 2019/20 No Detriment Policy

In the 2019/20 academic year, the University introduced the No Detriment Policy (.pdf). This policy included all assessments submitted in the 19/20 academic year, including referred or deferred assessments and postgraduate dissertations.

We have published the No Detriment Policy in full online, here. You will see that this was a complex policy, which took time to develop and is not always simple to explain, but we have published it in full to give you transparency on how we calculated your benchmark, and how the policy was used as the basis of a ‘safety net’, for assessments relating to the 2019/20 academic year.

The benchmark calculation looked at academic stage marks achieved before 15th March 2020, when the coronavirus caused disruption to all of us.

Please note that some programmes are subject to professional, statutory or regulatory body requirements, and therefore were not permitted to apply the no detriment policy. If this is the case students will be communicated with separately by their respective College.

The No Detriment Policy may seem complex (although at its heart it is fairly simple) and, therefore, we want to provide you with some hypothetical examples to illustrate how it worked. Please note, this policy is only relevant to assessments that took place in the 2019/20 academic year.

These are some undergraduate examples for a typical 3 year programme in which the final year mark has a weighting of 2 and the second year a weighting of 1 in the degree classification calculation.

Results ProgrammeWhat the benchmark means for you

Finalists

I have got consistent 2.1 marks in my second year and final year UG three year programme in which the final year mark has a weighting of 2 and the second year a weighting of 1 in the degree classification calculation You don’t need to worry about calculating the benchmark because it will be in the 2.1 class and, when combined with your 2.1 performance in the 2nd year, your degree mark will be in the 2.1 degree class as long as you complete and pass the year and are not subject to academic misconduct penalties
I have got consistent 1st class marks in my second year and final year UG three year programme in which the final year mark has a weighting of 2 and the second year a weighting of 1 in the degree classification calculation You don’t need to worry about calculating the benchmark because it will be in the 1st class and, when combined with your 1st class performance in the 2nd year, your degree mark will be in the 1st class as long as you complete and pass the year and are not subject to academic misconduct penalties
I have a stage mean of 68 for the second year, and completed 25% of my final year credits by 15th March with a mean (weighted by credits) of 75 UG three year programme in which the final year mark has a weighting of 2 and the second year a weighting of 1 in the degree classification calculation Your benchmark for the final year is 71.5 [(68 * 0.5) + (75 * 0.25 * 2)]. If you don’t improve on the benchmark, your degree mark will be in the 1st class [(68 + 71.5 + 71.5)/3 = 70.3] as long as you complete and pass the year and are not subject to academic misconduct penalties
I have a stage mean of 58 for the second year, and have completed 50% of my final year credits by 15th March with a mean (weighted by credits) of 65 UG three year programme in which the final year mark has a weighting of 2 and the second year a weighting of 1 in the degree classification calculation Your benchmark for the final year is 65 (you have completed enough credits). If you don’t improve on the benchmark, your degree mark will be in the 2.1 class [(58 + 65 + 65)/3 = 62.7] as long as you complete and pass the year and are not subject to academic misconduct penalties
I know I am borderline, have a stage mean of 68 for the second year and have completed 50% of my final year credits with a mean (weighted by credits) of 71 UG three year programme in which the final year mark has a weighting of 2 and the second year a weighting of 1 in the degree classification calculation Your benchmark for the final year is 71 (you have completed enough credits). If you don’t improve on the benchmark, your degree mark will be in the 1st class [(68 + 71 + 71)/3 = 70] as long as you complete and pass the year and are not subject to academic misconduct penalties
I know I am on the 2.1 borderline; I have a stage mean of 58 for the second year and have completed 25% of my final year credits by 15th March with a mean (weighted by credits) of 60 UG three year programme in which the final year mark has a weighting of 2 and the second year a weighting of 1 in the degree classification calculation Your benchmark for the final year is 59 [(58 * 0.5) + (60 * 0.25 * 2)]. You are still borderline and on these marks, if you don’t improve on the benchmark, your degree mark will be in the 2.2 class [(58 + 59 + 59)/3 = 58.7] as long as you complete and pass the year and are not subject to academic misconduct penalties. However, remember the benchmark is a safety-net and you have a lot of summer assessments in which to achieve the improvement you are looking for. Furthermore, exam boards (APACs) always look carefully at borderline candidates and, naturally, will give these special focus this year given the exceptional circumstances

Second year students

I have a stage mean of 55 for the 1st year but have completed 50% of my second year credits by 15th March with a mean (weighted by credits) of 65 UG three year programme in which the final year mark has a weighting of 2 and the second year a weighting of 1 in the degree classification calculation Your benchmark for the second year is 65 (you have completed enough credits). If you don’t improve on the benchmark, your stage mark will be 65 as long as you complete and pass the year and are not subject to academic misconduct penalties
I have a stage mean of 55 for the 1st year and have completed 25% of my second year credits by 15th March with a mean (weighted by credits) of 65 UG three year programme in which the final year mark has a weighting of 2 and the second year a weighting of 1 in the degree classification calculation Your benchmark for the second year is 60 [(55 * 0.5) + (65 * 0.25 * 2)]. Of course, you can still improve on this in the summer assessments as you have several to come and once you have a full set of second year marks, we don’t need to use the 1st year marks. However, if you don’t improve on the benchmark, your stage mark will still be in the 2.1 class because it will be set to your benchmark as long as you complete and pass the year and are not subject to academic misconduct penalties

First year students

I have completed 35% of my first year credits with a mean (weighted by credits) of 65 UG three year programme in which the final year mark has a weighting of 2 and the second year a weighting of 1 in the degree classification calculation You have a provisional benchmark of 65. It is provisional because you haven’t completed 50% of your credits. The June APAC will look at your performance in the summer assessment and as long as it is close to your provisional benchmark they will set your overall stage result at whichever is higher, your credit-weighted mean for the year (stage) or your provisional benchmark. This is all so long as you complete and pass the year and are not subject to academic misconduct penalties. If the APAC considers that performance between March and June is significantly lower than the provisional benchmark they have discretion to set your overall stage result at a mark lower than the provisional benchmark; if they do, you will be provided with the justification for this decision

Postgraduate programmes are more complicated but here are 2 examples for a typical 1 year programme:

I am a postgraduate student and I have completed 35% of my credits with a mean (weighted by credits) of 55, I will complete another 35% of credits by June and submit my dissertation, which is worth 30% of my credits, in September; what does it mean for me?

• You have a provisional benchmark of 55. It is provisional because you haven’t completed 50% of your credits. The June APAC will look at your performance in the summer assessment, by which time you will have completed more than 50% of your credits. As long as your performance between March and June is close to the provisional benchmark they will set your firm benchmark at whichever is higher, your credit-weighted mean for the year up to that point or your provisional benchmark as long as you are not subject to academic misconduct penalties. If the APAC considers that performance between March and June is significantly lower than the provisional benchmark they have discretion to set the firm benchmark lower than the provisional benchmark. However, if they do so, you will be provided with the justification for this decision.
• When you have completed your dissertation, as long as you have completed and passed the year and are not subject to academic misconduct penalties, your degree mark will be set to whichever is higher, your credit-weighted mean for the whole year or your firm benchmark.

I am a postgraduate student and I have completed 50% of my credits with a mean (weighted by credits) of 65, I will complete another 20% of credits by June and submit my dissertation, which is worth 30% of my credits, in September; what does it mean for me?

• You have a benchmark of 65. The June APAC will compare your credit-weighted mean for the year (stage), based on all your assessments to that point, with the benchmark. As long as you are not subject to academic misconduct penalties, if your credit-weighted mean is higher than your benchmark the exam board will increase your benchmark to your new, higher credit-weighted mean mark; otherwise your benchmark will be unchanged.
• When you have completed your dissertation, as long as you have completed and passed the year and are not subject to academic misconduct penalties, your degree mark will be set to whichever is higher, your credit-weighted mean for the whole year or your benchmark.

We hope that these examples help you understand and gain assurance about the way that we are seeking to support you to succeed.

The No Detriment policy cannot be applied until students have completed and passed their academic stage. Where you had not completed your academic stage by the end of 2019/20, the impact of COVID-19 on your results will be reviewed at a later point in your programme, once you have completed your current academic stage.

The final exam board (APAC) of your academic stage will apply the benchmark to assessments completed in the COVID-19 impacted period between 15th March 2020 and the end of September 2020.

An example of how this will work in practice is below:

• An undergraduate student has not yet completed any assessments in Stage 3.
• The student achieved a mean of 55% in Stage 2 – so their benchmark is 55%. (This will be referred to as a partial benchmark.)
• The student has 50% of their stage credits being assessed in summer 2020 which will be covered by the ’No Detriment’ policy, and associated benchmark. They achieve a mean of 51% over those credits.
• The student will then undertake 50% of their credits during 2020/21. They achieve a mean of 65% over those credits.
Their Stage 3 mean would be calculated as follows:
• 0.5 x 55% (i.e. the credits covered by the ‘No Detriment’ policy and benchmark) + 0.5 x 65% (i.e. the credits achieved in 2020/21) = 60% mean for the stage.

Where you do not have enough credit completed prior to 15th March 2020 to have a firm benchmark calculated by the end of September 2020, then a future APAC will exercise other existing powers to ensure that your academic outcome is not negatively impacted by the COVID-19.

In our No Detriment policy we have stated that provisional benchmarks became firm benchmarks at June 2020 APACs (exam boards) provided there was no ‘significant difference’ between the provisional benchmark and the credit weighted mean including assessments completed from 15th March to June 2020. Additional guidance has been provided here to explain how provisional benchmarks were used and how they were factored into final calculations.

To be clear:

1. If the credit weighted mean for the year is higher than the provisional benchmark, then the credit weighted mean for the year will be used instead of the provisional benchmark.
2. If the credit weighted mean for the year is lower than the provisional benchmark, then a formula will be applied to create a firm benchmark.

Exam boards (APACs) will use the following formula to calculate whether there is a reliable benchmark that can be used where the credit weighted mean is lower than the provisional benchmark.

Definitions:
• P = the provisional benchmark,
• A = the number of partial credits obtained up to 15 March 2020,
• M = the credit weighted mean for the stage,
• μ = A / 60 (for UG) or A / 90 (for PGT),

We compute a firm benchmark B by:

B = μ P + (1 – μ) M.

The final stage mark should be taken as the higher of B and M.

The formula interpolates between two extremes and provides a continuum. In the case where a student has attained almost no credits in the stage, the quantity μ will be close to zero, so B will be close to M (the stage credit-weighted mean, including post 15th March marks). However, if a student has attained almost 60 (or 90 for PGT students) credits, then μ will be close to 1, so B will be roughly P, the provisional benchmark (including only pre-15 March marks).

Here are some case studies to help explain this further:

1. A UG student who has completed 30% of their total 120 credits for the year by 15th March. The credits taken by 15th March gave them a provisional benchmark of 55.

After completing all of their assessments for 2019/20 they achieved an overall credit weighted mean of 56.

As this is higher than their provisional benchmark, they receive a total score for the year of 56.

2. A UG student who had completed 25% of credits by 15th March, corresponding to A = 0.25 × 120 = 30 for UG and achieved a provisional benchmark of 69.

After completing further assessments after 15th March they had a credit weighted mean of 65.

As this was lower than their provisional benchmark, a firm benchmark score would need to be applied. To ensure that the impacts of COVID-19 mitigation are taken into account and a fair score is reached, the formula will be applied (as provided above):

We compute a firm benchmark B by first computing μ = A / 60 = ½. The formula is:
B = μ P + (1 – μ) M.

In this case, B = ½ × 69 + (1 - ½) × 65 = 67.

The student achieves a firm benchmark of 67.

3. A Masters student who had completed 43% of their credits by 15th March, corresponding to A = 0.43 × 180 = 77.4 for PGT, and achieved a provisional benchmark of 68.

The remainder of their assessments were taken online after 15th March and gave them a credit weighted mean of 66.
As this was lower than their provisional benchmark, a firm benchmark score would need to be applied. To ensure that the impacts of COVID-19 mitigation are taken into account and a fair score is reached the formula will be applied. We start by computing μ = A / 90 = 0.

B = μ P + (1 – μ) M.

In this case B = 0.86 × 68 + (1 – 0.86) × 66 = 67.72.

After rounding, the student would achieve a firm benchmark of 68.

Section A: Understanding your results

If you are unable to find the answers you require in these FAQs, please contact coronavirusenquiries@exeter.ac.uk in the first instance.

In calculating stage averages, module results are weighted according to the module’s credit value and the overall credit total for the stage.

Take the example of a standard UG student who completes 120 credits per stage:

• The Weighting is obtained by dividing the Credits Awarded for the module by 120 credits.
• The Weighted Mark is obtained by multiplying the Weighting by the Module Mark.
• The sum of all of the Weighted Marks provides the Stage Average.

In the example below:

• Module XXX1001 has a weighting of 15 credits / 120 credit total for the stage = 0.125
• 0.125 (Weighting) x 57 (module mark) = 7.13 Weighted Mark for module XXX 1001
• The sum of all Weighted Marks = 53.125, rounded to 2 decimals places = 53.13 which represents the Stage Average.

Module CodeModule MarkCredits AwardedWeightingWeighted Mark
XXX1001 57 15 0.125 7.125
XXX1002 52
15 0.125 6.5
XXX1003 47 15 0.125 5.875
XXX1004 64 15 0.125 8
XXX1005 63 15 0.125 7.875
XXX1006 71 30 0.25 17.75
         
      Stage Average 53.125 rounded to 2 decimals places = 53.13

For most PGT programmes, the stage average is defined by the overall credit requirement for the programme, i.e. 180 credits for a standard Masters, 120 credits for a Postgraduate Diploma, and 60 credits for a Postgraduate Certificate.

Looking at the example above, module XXX 1001 would have a Weighting of 15 credits / 180 overall credit requirement = 0.083.

These are listed in the University’s Teaching and Quality Assurance manual. See Academic Credit Requirements for Award for details.

The University’s Teaching and Quality Assurance Manual provides the necessary details on stage weightings and classification rules for each type of programme and degree, to enable you to determine your final credit-weighted average and degree classification.

See Classification of Awards for details.

Transcripts will display the average credit-weighted mark for the stage and this average will have been calculated based on marks attained from modules. These marks will have been through a number of quality assurance processes during exam board (APAC) ratification. These processes may include scaling or perhaps having penalties for academic misconduct or late submission applied. The final component and module marks may not always correspond with the benchmark or stage average you calculated in advance.

PGT results were reviewed in June in order to increase the partial benchmark or set firm benchmarks; these will be for internal use and not be communicated to students at the time. The benchmarks will be factored into awarding at the final APAC of the programme, which for most PGT programmes takes place in the Autumn, and will be included in the calculation of the degree classification and will be displayed on the final transcript. Transcripts will display the average credit-weighted mark for the stage and this average will have been calculated based on marks attained from modules. These marks will have been through a number of quality assurance processes during exam board (APAC) ratification. These processes may include scaling or perhaps having penalties for academic misconduct or late submission applied.