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500 million year-old fossils reveal answer to evolutionary riddle

An exceptionally well-preserved collection of fossils discovered in eastern Yunnan Province, China, has enabled scientists to solve a centuries-old riddle in the evolution of life on earth, revealing what the first animals to make skeletons looked like. The results have been published today in Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

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Breakthrough in protecting bananas from Panama disease

Exeter scientists have provided hope in the fight to control Panama disease in bananas.

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Bumblebees revisit favourite flowers as sun sets

As the sun sets, bumblebees revisit "profitable" flowers they encountered during the day, new research suggests.

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A rapid switch in magmatic plumbing taps porphyry copper deposit-forming magmas

Scientists have made a fascinating new discovery about the formation of mineral deposits crucial to our transition to a ‘green economy’. 

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How fluctuating oxygen levels may have accelerated animal evolution

Oxygen levels in the Earth’s atmosphere are likely to have “fluctuated wildly” one billion years ago, creating conditions that could have accelerated the development of early animal life, according to new research.

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“Plant blindness” is caused by urban life and could be cured through wild food foraging, study shows

“Plant blindness” is caused by a lack of exposure to nature and could be cured by close contact through activities such as wild food foraging, a study shows.

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Sustainable fishing plan for Caribbean spiny lobsters

A new project will help to ensure sustainable fishing and aquaculture (fish farming) of Caribbean spiny lobsters.

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'Forgotten' forests and savannas vital to people, biodiversity and climate

With massive international focus on rainforests, the vital importance of tropical dry forests and savannas is being overlooked, researchers say.

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Major new study shows 'concerning' levels of physical and mental health problems among farmers and agricultural workers

A major new study shows “concerning” levels of physical and mental health problems among farmers and agricultural workers.

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Parental age could be key factor in helping thoroughbred horses be first past the post

In a sport where the finest of margins can determine the winner, a new study has shown that parental age can be a determining factor in who comes out on top in horse races.

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Centre for Water Systems secures funding boost for pivotal research and education projects

Two pivotal new projects, led by experts from the University of Exeter and designed to bolster research and education within the water sector, have secured a significant funding boost.

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Key breakthrough links changes in length-of-day with climate prediction

Scientists have made a key breakthrough in the quest to accurately predict fluctuations in the rotation of the Earth and so the length of the day - potentially opening up new predictions for the effects of climate change. 

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Family ties give animals reasons to 'help or harm' as they age

The structure of family groups gives animals an incentive to help or harm their social group as they age, new research shows.

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New bid to 'outflank' antimicrobial resistance

A major new project will investigate the defence mechanisms of bacterial cells, to help stop the spread of drug-resistant genes.

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Fertilisers cause more than 2% of global emissions

Synthetic nitrogen fertilisers account for 2.1% of global greenhouse gas emissions, new research shows.

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Lack of public appreciation contributes to loneliness in farming, study shows

A lack of public appreciation for farmers and understanding of the work they do and the pressures they’re under contributes to feelings of loneliness, according to a new study.

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Lack of technical and financial support hinders efforts to implement global guidelines for antimicrobial resistance in Benin and Burkina Faso, study shows

Lack of technical and financial support hinders efforts to implement global guidelines for antimicrobial resistance in Benin and Burkina Faso, new research shows.

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Quest to uncover intricacies of exoplanet atmospheres reaches important milestone

The quest to uncover intricacies of the atmospheres of faraway planets has reached an important milestone.

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Major new tipping points initiative launched at conference

Efforts to activate "positive tipping points" to tackle the climate crisis have been boosted by a £1 million (US$1.15m) grant from the Bezos Earth Fund.

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Little Ice Age study reveals North Atlantic reached a tipping point

Scientists have used centuries-old clam shells to see how the North Atlantic climate system reached a "tipping point" before the Little Ice Age.

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Risk of passing multiple climate tipping points escalates above 1.5°C global warming

Multiple climate tipping points could be triggered if global temperature rises beyond 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels, according to a major new analysis.

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Penguin publishing deal helped Virginia Woolf’s work reach a mass market, study shows

Careful deals negotiated by Virginia Woolf’s husband with Penguin Books helped her work reach a mass market, a new study shows.

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Norman dominance of Europe inspired first crusades in the Holy Land, new book shows

First European crusaders of Holy Land were inspired by fame and fortune awarded to Norman conquerors in Europe.

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Bees use patterns – not just colours – to find flowers

Honeybees rely heavily on flower patterns when searching for food, new research shows.

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'Disconnection' and 'significant policy churn' may impact the success of T Level vocational qualifications, study warns

Disconnection between further education lecturers and industry and significant policy churn may impact on the success of T Level qualifications, a new study warns.

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'Radical decentralisation' needed in Iran to allow Kurdish communities to benefit from natural resources, study argues

A radical decentralisation of politics and decision-making in Iran is needed to allow Kurdish communities to benefit from natural resources, experts have argued.

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Scientists study tourists to protect great apes

Researchers are protecting great apes from diseases by studying the behaviour and expectations of tourists who visit them.

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Congo creates first Marine Protected Areas

The Republic of the Congo has created its first ever Marine Protected Areas (MPAs), supported by a research team including the University of Exeter and the Wildlife Conservation Society.

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First exoplanet image from James Webb Space Telescope revealed

Astronomers from the University of Exeter have led the effort to capture the first-ever direct image of an exoplanet using the pioneering James Webb Space Telescope.

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Crime-scene technique identifies asteroid sites

Analysing the charred remains of plants can confirm the locations of asteroid strikes in the distant past, new research shows.

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Terrorism became more important issue for voters following Manchester bombing, study shows

Terrorism became a more important issue for voters during the 2017 General Election because of the Manchester bombing, a new study shows.

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Half of pupils who get low grades in GCSEs already judged to be behind at age 5, study finds

Assessments of children as early as age 3 and 5 are powerful predictors of who will go on to fail to secure good GCSE results in English language and maths, a major study has revealed.

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Longer wait for some forms of cancer diagnosis for Black and Asian patients

Black and Asian patients are waiting up to a month longer than White patients for some forms of cancer diagnosis from the point at which they first seek medical help, new research has found.

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Majority of posts on extremist online forums made by “hyper” poster cliques, study shows

Most posts in extremist online forums are made by a clique of particularly committed members, a major new study shows.

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Stronger religious beliefs linked to higher levels of sexual satisfaction, study shows

Having stronger religious beliefs is linked to higher levels of sexual satisfaction, a new study shows.

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Beef farmers want to transition to net zero – but practical and financial barriers are standing in their way, report warns

Practical and financial barriers associated with reducing carbon footprints and capturing more carbon are standing in the way of beef farmers making the transition to net zero, a report warns.

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Struggling to choose between Liz or Rishi? New website will help you make your pick

Voters struggling to understand what the Tory leader contest means for them can get help from a new website.

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Scientists stunned by vast insect migration

Migratory insects cross at least 100km of open sea to reach Cyprus on the way to mainland Europe.

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Government should enlist expertise of the private sector to fight kleptocracy, experts urge

Experts have urged the Government to enlist the expertise of the private sector to fight kleptocracy.

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Songs, stories and food used to showcase impact of Penryn’s Loveland Community Field at unique event

Songs, stories and vegetables and grain grown in Penryn helped showcase Loveland Community Field.

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New study maps the influence of organised crime and the wealthy over Russian foreign policy

Russian foreign policy-making is often guided by elites, intermediaries, private companies, and organised crime groups rather than the national interest, a new study shows.

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Community growing schemes and mapping empty housing identified as key sustainability goals for Cornwall

Supporting community growing schemes and mapping unused properties to house local people have been identified as sustainability goals for the coming year by community leaders across Cornwall, according to a new report.

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Study achieves longest continuous tracking of migrating insects

Insects are the world’s smallest flying migrants, but they can maintain perfectly straight flight paths even in unfavorable wind conditions, according to a new study from the Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior (MPI-AB) and the University of Konstanz in Germany, and the University of Exeter in the UK.

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Safeguarding Indigenous Peoples’ lands could save primates

Safeguarding Indigenous Peoples' lands offers the best chance of preventing the extinction of the world's primates, researchers say.

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Amazon's growth limited by lack of phosphorus

Growth of the Amazon rainforest in our increasingly carbon-rich atmosphere could be limited by a lack of phosphorus in the soil, new research shows.

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New book reveals the historical and political inspirations of Star Wars

Real-world historical events and political actors have played a pivotal role in shaping the Star Wars universe according to a ground-breaking new book published this week.

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Education experts awarded prestigious National Teaching Fellowships

Two education experts renowned for their innovative approaches to teaching and learning and professional development have been recognised with a prestigious national fellowship.

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Harmful antipsychotics prescribing jumped 50 per cent in dementia care homes during pandemic

Prescribing of potentially harmful antipsychotics to people with dementia has increased by more than 50 per cent on average in care homes during the pandemic, new research has found.

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How measuring blood pressure in both arms can help reduce cardiovascular risk and hypertension

Blood pressure should be measured in both arms and the higher reading should be adopted to improve hypertension diagnosis and management, according to a new study.

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Exeter’s environmental expertise makes Bristol Avon Catchment Market a world-first

Nature-based projects that help the environment will be incentivised through an innovative new online market.

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Mindful employees find their jobs less boring and are less likely to quit

Employees who practise mindfulness are less bored at work and less likely to quit, according to a new study.

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Experts to discuss 'tipping points' alliance

Experts will meet next month to discuss catastrophic climate "tipping points" – and the power of positive tipping points to avert the climate crisis.

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Climate change: potential to end humanity ‘dangerously underexplored’

Global heating could become “catastrophic” for humanity if temperature rises are worse than many predict or cause cascades of events we have yet to consider, or indeed both. The world needs to start preparing for the possibility of a “climate endgame”.

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Cloud study demystifies impact of aerosols

Aerosol particles in the atmosphere have a bigger impact on cloud cover than previously thought.

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Fieldwork carried out over 20 years will show comprehensive history of modern Shiʿism’s foundational intellectual moment

Fieldwork over two decades will help experts produce the first comprehensive account of modern Shiʿism’s foundational intellectual moment.

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Breakthrough in understanding why we struggle to recognise the faces of people from different racial backgrounds

Cognitive Psychologists at the University of Exeter believe they have discovered the answer to a 60-year-old question as to why people find it more difficult to recognise faces from visually distinct racial backgrounds than they do their own. 

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Exeter researchers pay tribute to James Lovelock

University of Exeter researchers have paid tribute to scientist James Lovelock, who has died aged 103.

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Metaphor and images should be used alongside traditional medical scales for patients to describe pain, study says

Patients should be able to use images and metaphors alongside traditional medical scales to describe their pain to doctors, a new study says.

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Famine and disease drove the evolution of lactose tolerance in Europe

Prehistoric people in Europe were consuming milk thousands of years before humans evolved the genetic trait allowing us to digest the milk sugar lactose as adults. 

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‘New customer behaviours’ are key to developing circular economy, report finds

Consumer behaviour needs to change fundamentally to ensure the successful transition to a circular economy, according to a new report.

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Scientists unravel mystery behind formation of first quasars in the early universe

The quest to unravel the mystery behind the formation of the first quasars in the early universe has taken a significant step forward.

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University of Exeter expert plays crucial role in new UK Critical Minerals Strategy

An expert from the University of Exeter has played an important role to secure the supply chain of critical minerals.

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Exeter experts elected to prestigious British Academy Fellowships

Three academics from the University of Exeter have been elected as Fellows of the British Academy.

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'Sensing system' spots struggling ecosystems

A new "resilience sensing system" can identify ecosystems that are in danger of collapse, research shows.

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University of Exeter hosts British Association for Applied Linguistics Vocabulary Special Interest Group Annual Conference 2022

The University of Exeter’s Graduate School of Education hosted the British Association for Applied Linguistics Vocabulary Special Interest Group’s Annual Conference 2022.

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Philanthropic donation will help achieve a sustainable future for mining

Anglo American, one of the world’s leading mining companies, has made a transformational donation to support sustainable mining research and education at the Camborne School of Mines, University of Exeter.

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Migrant workers to collaborate with experts on new study to analyse impact of post-Brexit visas

Migrant care home and agricultural workers will co-create new research to analyse the impact of new visa rules introduced following Brexit.

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Pivotal report identifies vision for tackling engineering research challenges

A pivotal new report has delivered a long-term vision for how engineering research will help to tackle some of the world’s key challenges.

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Urgent need for the UK and its allies to clarify how they will respond militarily to imminent armed attacks, study says

There is an urgent need for the UK and allies to give clearer information about how they would respond in self-defence to ‘imminent’ armed attacks, a new study says.

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‘Democratic AI’ makes more favoured economic policy decisions

Artificial intelligence systems that are trained to align with human values could be used to develop more popular economic policies, a new study has found.

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£850,000 NIHR funding for new Exeter bipolar research

More than £850,000 from the National Institute for Health and Care Research (NIHR) will fund University of Exeter research into treatment for people living with bipolar, aimed at developing new talking therapies.

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Stunning renovation of Teignmouth’s seaside heritage brings cinematic history alive

The stunning renovation of one of Teignmouth’s quirkiest seaside features will bring cinematic history alive for all ages.

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£3 million for new carbon capture project and pilot plant

A new carbon capture project could pave the way for large-scale removal of carbon dioxide (CO₂) from the atmosphere using the ocean.

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Teachers and experts join forces for major new research network to support Deaf children’s achievement at school

Teachers, researchers and British Sign Language interpreters have joined forces for a major new research network which will seek to understand why Deaf pupils are more likely to underperform at school.

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Swans sacrifice rest to squabble

Swans give up resting time to fight over the best feeding spots, new research shows.

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Scientists discover key genes behind insect migrations

Scientists have identified more than 1,500 genetic differences between migratory and non-migratory hoverflies.

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False beliefs about prevalence of crime could influence jury decisions, new study shows

Some juror decisions are influenced by perceptions of the prevalence of crimes which can be incorrect or biased, a new study shows.

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Women-led businesses hit harder during height of COVID, study finds

Businesses led by women were hit harder by COVID-19 than those led by men, according to a new study.

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How wildflower seed can help business bloom

The vital role of wildflower seeds in pollinating our food, maintaining biodiversity and contributing to the economy will be highlighted on National Meadows Day (2 July) in two new reports published by the South West Partnership for Environmental and Economic Prosperity Programme (SWEEP).

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Americans more likely than those in the UK to feel threatened by China’s development as a world power, survey shows

Americans were more likely than people living in the UK to feel threatened by China’s growth as a world power, a new survey shows.

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Coronavirus pandemic has led to more “microworking” – study shows

The coronavirus pandemic has led to more people choosing to become “microworkers”, a new study shows.

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Introducing the Real Living Wage to Penzance would improve the local economy, new research suggests

Giving Living Wage Town status to Penzance would help improve the local economy and the reputation of the area, new research shows.

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Experts developing wearable technology to support women to remain active as they age

New wearable technology will be developed as part of a project to help older women stay active and keep playing sport.

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