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CROUST Jamie Shutler

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Can measurements from space address critical science priorities for quantifying ocean carbon?

Can measurements from space address critical science priorities for quantifying ocean carbon?

A Centre for Geography, Environment and Society seminar
Date13 March 2019
Time13:00 to 14:00
PlaceCROUST Jamie Shutler

The end of 2018 saw the release of multiple key reports showing the scale and pace of change that is needed if we are to limit global average temperature rise to 1.5C. Collectively ocean and terrestrial uptake of carbon dioxide have helped to reduce the strength of global warming. The ocean, which is the largest long-term net sink of carbon, has so far absorbed ~25% of total anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Accurately quantifying and monitoring this exchange in the vast oceans, which cover >70% of the Earth’s surface, presents a significant challenge. However, this capability is needed if we are to successfully track our progress towards meeting the aims of the Paris climate agreement. Jamie Shutler’s seminar will focus on where and how space observations can, and are, being used to enable quantification and advances in knowledge of atmosphere-ocean carbon dioxide exchange, along with highlighting future opportunities and advances.

The end of 2018 saw the release of multiple key reports showing the scale and pace of change that is needed if we are to limit global average temperature rise to 1.5C.

Collectively ocean and terrestrial uptake of carbon dioxide have helped to reduce the strength of global warming. The ocean, which is the largest long-term net sink of carbon, has so far absorbed ~25% of total anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Accurately quantifying and monitoring this exchange in the vast oceans, which cover >70% of the Earth’s surface, presents a significant challenge. However, this capability is needed if we are to successfully track our progress towards meeting the aims of the Paris climate agreement.

Jamie Shutler’s seminar will focus on where and how space observations can, and are, being used to enable quantification and advances in knowledge of atmosphere-ocean carbon dioxide exchange, along with highlighting future opportunities and advances. Examples of exploitation and synergies between in situ, drone, kite, light aircraft and satellite observations will be presented.  The seminar will focus on advances made by Jamie’s collaborations with UK, US and EU partners, the European Space Agency and the International Space Science Institute.


OrganizerJane Wills
Tel01326253761
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