Skip to main content

Undergraduate Study

BA Archaeology and Anthropology - 2025 entry

Please note: The below is for 2025 entries. Click here for 2024 entries.
UCAS code VL46
Duration 3 years
Entry year 2025
Campus Streatham Campus
Discipline Archaeology
Contact

Web: Enquire online
Phone: 0300 555 6060 (UK callers) 
+44 (0)1392 723044 (EU/International callers)

Typical offer

View full entry requirements

A-Level: AAB
IB: 34/665
BTEC: DDD

Contextual offers

A-Level: BBB
IB: 30/555
BTEC: DDM-DDD

Overview

  • Combine two closely linked disciplines and study the common ground between them
  • Explore people and society in the past and present
  • Engage with archaeological and ethnographic studies of cultures around the world
  • Explore themes such as human evolution, art, gender, death and war
  • Spend at least four weeks working on an excavation, fieldwork or related practical work in the UK or abroad

View 2024 Entry

Request a prospectus

Open Days and visiting us

How to apply

Contact

Web: Enquire online

Phone: +44 (0)1392 72 72 72

Top 10 in the UK for Archaeology and Forensic Science

9th in The Times and The Sunday Times Good University Guide 2024

Top 15 in the UK for Anthropology

12th in the Guardian University Guide 2024

Top 50 in world subject rankings for Archaeology

QS World University Subject Rankings 2024

Applied experience and fieldwork opportunities in the UK and abroad

Since beginning at the University of Exeter, my subject has very much become a huge part of who I am.

The Archaeology department really encourages students to get involved with excavation field-trips as part of the course, and I have been fortunate enough to have visited South Dakota, USA and Kazakhstan as part of this. These are not only the most memorable parts of my University experience, but they have also allowed me to develop useful skills applicable to voluntary placements and, no doubt, in my future work endeavours. I would really encourage other students to get involved with volunteering around Exeter as there is a plethora of interesting work available; in my instance, I have completed over a year’s voluntary work with the Royal Albert Memorial Museum and the Bill Douglas Cinema Museum, both of which have supplemented my subject really well and undoubtedly helped me in being accepted onto a Master’s course. The University also has great potential for students wanting to get involved with sports and societies to relax from course-work and socialise - I play both football and netball for Archaeology society intramural teams (which means any ability will do!) and have thoroughly enjoyed doing so.

Read more from Ollie

Ollie

BA Archaeology and Anthropology

Entry requirements (typical offer)

Qualification Typical offer Required subjects
A-Level AAB n/a
IB 34/665 n/a
BTEC DDD n/a
GCSE C or 4 English Language
Access to HE 30 L3 credits at Distinction Grade and 15 L3 credits at Merit Grade N/A
T-Level Distinction N/A
Contextual Offer

A-Level: BBB
IB: 30/555
BTEC: DDM-DDD

Specific subject requirements must still be achieved where stated above. Find out more about contextual offers.

Other accepted qualifications

View other accepted qualifications

English language requirements

International students need to show they have the required level of English language to study this course. The required test scores for this course fall under Profile B2. Please visit our English language requirements page to view the required test scores and equivalencies from your country.

NB General Studies is not included in any offer.

Grades advertised on each programme webpage are the typical level at which our offers are made and provide information on any specific subjects an applicant will need to have studied in order to be considered for a place on the programme. However, if we receive a large number of applications for the programme we may not be able to make an offer to all those who are predicted to achieve/have achieved grades which are in line with our typical offer. For more information on how applications are assessed and when decisions are released, please see: After you apply

Course content

The modules we outline here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand.

30 credits of compulsory Archaeology modules and 60 credits of compulsory Anthropology modules, 30 credits of Archaeology optional modules

Compulsory modules

CodeModule Credits
ARC1010 Themes in World Archaeology 15
ARC1020 Essential Archaeological Methods 15
SPA1000 Imagining Social Worlds 30
ANT1000 Introduction to Social Anthropology 30

Optional modules

CodeModule Credits
ARC BA Archaeology and Anthropology (Archaeology) Stage 1 Optional modules 2023-4
ARA1030 Introduction to Islamic Archaeology 15
ARC1007 Archaeological and Forensic Science Practicals 15
ARC1008 Forensic Archaeology 15
ARC1040 Artefacts and Materials 15
ARC1050 Objects: Contexts and Display 15
ARC1070 Practical Skills in Archaeology 30

15-30 credits of compulsory Archaeology modules, 30 credits of compulsory Anthropology modules, 30-45 credits of optional Archaeology modules (including HUM2000 and HUM2001 Humanities in the Workplace), and 30 credits of optional Anthropology modules

a You must take either ARC2003 or ARC2004 (you cannot choose both).

Compulsory modules

CodeModule Credits
ARC2003 Archaeological Fieldwork Project [See note a above]30
ARC2004 Archaeological Fieldschool [See note a above]30
ANT2000 Current Debates in Anthropology 30

Optional modules

CodeModule Credits
ARC S2 BA SH and CH opt 2023-4
ARC2003 Archaeological Fieldwork Project 30
ARA2014 Regions and Empires in Islamic Archaeology 15
ARC2004 Archaeological Fieldschool 30
ARC2012 Monumental Changes: Neolithic and Early Bronze Age Britain and Ireland 15
ARC2120 Things and Us: Ancient and Contemporary Material Culture 15
ARC2121 Brooches, Beads, Swords and Shields: Early Medieval Material Culture 15
ARC2123 Sustainability and Collapse in Past Societies 15
ARC2130 Discovering the Past with Molecular Science 15
ARC2401 Understanding the Landscape of Medieval Britain 15
ARC2406 Medieval Castles in Context 15
ARC2408 Romanisation: Interaction, Conquest and Change in Late Iron Age and Roman Dacia 15
ARC2504 Zooarchaeology 15
ARC2514 Forensic Anthropology 15
ARC2516 Human Origins and Evolution: the Lower and Middle Palaeolithic 15
CLA2514 Ancient Sources (Material Evidence) - Pompeii: Destruction, Discovery and Afterlife 15
CLA2517 Ancient Sources (Material Evidence): Hellenistic Palaces in West Asia 15
HIH2002 Uses of the Past 30
HIH2208A Medieval Paris 30
HIH2234 Sailors, Slavery and Piracy: The Atlantic World, 1600 - 1800 30
HIH2592 Science, Empire, and Natural History Museums: A Global Perspective 30
ARC BA Archaeology and Anthropology (Anthropology) Stage 2 Optional modules 2023-4
ANT2004 Into the Field 15
ANT2005 Current Debates in Anthropology: Practice 15
ANT2009 Living Cities: Migration, Place and the Politics of Identities 15
ANT2014 Cultures: Food 15
ANT2015 The Deep Past, History and Humanity 15
ANT2016 Anthropology of the State 15
ANT2021 Anthropology of the Middle East 15
ANT2023 Theory and Methods of Food Preservation 15
ANT2024 Environments in Public 15
ANT2041 How Organisations Work: Ethnography in Institutions 15
ANT2042 Gardening, Wellbeing and Community 15
ANT2085 Health, Illness and Bodies in Contemporary Society Part 1: Medicine and Social Control 15
ANT2086 Addiction 30
ANT2087 Disability and Society 15
ANT2088 Health, Illness and Bodies in Contemporary Society: Part 2: Bodies in Society 15
ANT2089 Cultures of Race, Ethnicity and Racism 15
ANT2090 Sound and Society 15
ANT2097 Environment and Society 15
ANT2105 Contemporary Capitalism, Critique and Resistance 15
ANT2107 Culture and Wellbeing 15
ANT2109 Anthropology of Forced Migration 15
ANT2110 Animal Minds and Animal Ethics 15
ANT2111 Climate Change in Global and Local Perspectives 15
ANT2112 When Things Fall Apart: Social Infrastructures 15
ANT2113 Social Media, Disinformation, and Authoritarianism 15
ANT2114 The Anthropology of Prisons 15
ANT2115 Emotions, the Body, and the Social 15
ANT2116 Animals and Society 15
ANT2117 Dogs and Cats: Anthropological Subjects 15
ARA2118 Gender-Identity and Modernity in the Middle East 15
ARA2134 Ethnography of the Middle East 15
ARA2150 Muslims in Britain 15
HUM HUM2000-HUM2001
HUM2000 Humanities in the Workplace 30
HUM2001 Humanities in the Workplace 15

Typically, any placement year will take place in Year 3. If you are not taking a placement year please see the Final Year modules for year 3.

0-30 credits of compulsory Archaeology modules, 0-30 credits of compulsory Anthropology modules, 30-60 credits of optional Archaeology modules, and 30-60 credits of optional Anthropology modules

c You must take either ANT3040 or ARC3000 (you cannot choose both).

Compulsory modules

CodeModule Credits
ARC3000 Archaeological Dissertation [See note c above]30
ANT3040 Anthropology Dissertation [See note c above]30

Optional modules

.

CodeModule Credits
ARC SF BA SH and CH opt 2023-4
ARC3003 Professional Placement 30
ARC3006 Advanced Fieldwork Project 15
ARC3011 Practicing Archaeological Science 15
ARC3012 Monumental changes: Neolithic and Early Bronze Age Britain and Ireland 15
ARC3120 Things and Us: Ancient and Contemporary Material Culture 15
ARC3121 Brooches, Beads, Swords and Shields: Early Medieval Material Culture 15
ARC3123 Sustainability and Collapse in Past Societies 15
ARC3401 Understanding the Landscape of Medieval Britain 15
ARC3406 Medieval Castles in Context 15
ARC3510 Experimental Approaches to Forensic and Archaeological Investigations 15
ARC3516 Human Origins and Evolution: the Lower and Middle Palaeolithic 15
ARC3611 Funerary Osteoarchaeology 15
ARC3408 Romanisation: Interaction, Conquest and Change in Late Iron Age and Roman Dacia 15
ARC3133 Digital Pasts 15
ARC BA Archaeology and Anthropology (Anthropology) Stage 3/4 Optional modules 2023-4
ANT3004 Living Cities: Migration, Place and the Politics of Identities 15
ANT3014 Cultures: Food 15
ANT3015 The Deep Past, History and Humanity 15
ANT3016 Anthropology of the State 15
ANT3021 Anthropology of the Middle East 15
ANT3023 Theory and Methods of Food Preservation 15
ANT3024 Anthropology of Forced Migration 15
ANT3041 Environments in Public 15
ANT3053 How Organisations Work: Ethnography in Institutions 15
ANT3054 Gardening, Wellbeing and Community 15
ANT3085 Health, Illness and Bodies in Contemporary Society Part 1: Medicine and Social Control 15
ANT3086 Addiction 30
ANT3087 Disability and Society 15
ANT3088 Health, Illness and Bodies in Contemporary Society: Part 2: Bodies in Society 15
ANT3089 Cultures of Race, Ethnicity and Racism 15
ANT3090 Sound and Society 15
ANT3092 Animal Minds and Animal Ethics 15
ANT3093 Climate Change in Global and Local Perspectives 15
ANT3094 When Things Fall Apart: Social Infrastructures 15
ANT3095 Social Media, Disinformation, and Authoritarianism 15
ANT3096 The Anthropology of Prisons 15
ANT3097 Environment and Society 15
ANT3098 Emotions, the Body, and the Social 15
ANT3099 Animals and Society 15
ANT3100 Dogs and Cats: Anthropological subjects 15
ANT3107 Culture and Wellbeing 15
ANT3109 Contemporary Capitalism, Critique and Resistance 15

Course variants

UCAS code: VL47

Our four-year ‘with Study Abroad’ degree, offers you the possibility of spending your third year abroad, studying with one of our many partner universities.

Why Study Abroad?

Living and studying in a different country is an exciting experience that broadens your academic and cultural horizons, as well as giving you the opportunity to widen your circle of friends. Students who have studied abroad demonstrate initiative, independence, motivation and, depending on where they stay, may also have gained a working knowledge of another language – all key qualities that employers are looking for in today’s competitive employment environment.

Where can I Study Abroad?

We have partnership arrangements with many prestigious institutions across the globe. Exactly where you can apply to study will depend on the subjects you are studying at Exeter. For a full list please visit the Study Abroad website.

Does it count towards my degree?

Credit for academic work during your year abroad is arranged by agreement between the University of Exeter and the host institution. These marks are then translated back into your degree at Exeter. If you are Studying Abroad for a semester or full year, your time abroad will count toward your final degree. Please refer to your Study Abroad co-ordinator for further details.

How does it affect my tuition fee and funding?

For the year that you spend studying abroad you will pay a significantly reduced tuition fee to Exeter, but nothing to your host university – for more information visit our fees pages. If you were previously eligible, you will continue to receive a maintenance loan whilst on your Study Abroad year.

UCAS code: VL48

Our four-year ‘with Employment Experience’ degree, offers you the possibility of spending your third year carrying out a graduate-level work placement or placements within the UK as part of your degree.

Why choose to include Employment Experience?

Undertaking graduate-level work during your degree unlocks a world of experience that allows you to develop essential employability and interpersonal skills that relate to your degree and future career. A work placement will dramatically boost your confidence, enhance your CV and develop graduate level skills and competencies that employers are looking for.

Where will I do my work placement?

The sector you choose to work within is very much your choice as you will be responsible for finding and organising your placement. We will provide plenty of guidance and support during your first and second years which will prepare you to research and apply for placements. Ultimately, the university will give final approval to your placement to make sure you have a valuable experience.

How does it affect my tuition fees and funding?

For your ‘Year In Industry’ you will pay a significantly reduced tuition fee to Exeter – for more information visit our fees pages. If you were previously eligible, you will continue to receive a maintenance loan whilst on your year of work placement/s.

Find out more

Visit our website to learn more about employment experience opportunities. 

UCAS code: VL49

Our four-year ‘with Employment Experience Abroad’ degree, offers you the possibility of spending your third year abroad, carrying out a graduate-level work placement or placements as part of your degree.

Why choose to include Employment Experience Abroad?

Spending up to a year living and working in a different country is an exciting experience that broadens your academic and cultural horizons, as well as giving you the opportunity to widen your circle of friends. By carrying out a graduate-level work placement or placements abroad you can demonstrate to employers your adaptability, cultural awareness, independence and resourcefulness and, depending on where you stay, may also have gained a working knowledge of another language.

Where will I do my work placement?

The sector and country you choose to work within is very much your choice as you will be responsible for finding and organising your placement. We will provide plenty of guidance and support during your first and second years which will prepare you to research and apply for placements. Ultimately, the university will give final approval to your placement to make sure you have a valuable experience.

How does it affect my tuition fee?

For your ‘Year In Industry’ you will pay a significantly reduced tuition fee to Exeter – for more information visit our fees pages. If you were previously eligible, you will continue to receive a maintenance loan whilst on your year of work placement/s.

Is the placement paid?

You will be paid in accordance with the rules of the country you work in and there may be visa restrictions or requirements which you need to consider when applying.

Find out more

Visit our website to learn more about employment experience opportunities. 

Fees

Tuition fees for 2024 entry

UK students: £9,250 per year
International students: £23,700 per year

Scholarships

The University of Exeter has many different scholarships available to support your education, including £5 million in scholarships for international students, such as our Global Excellence Scholarships*. Financial support is also available for students from disadvantaged backgrounds, lower income households and other under-represented groups to help them access, succeed and progress through higher education.

* Terms and conditions apply. See online for details.

Find out more about tuition fees and scholarships

Learning and teaching

How will I learn?

You will be taught through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, field trips, and computer-led learning, led by internationally respected academics at the forefront of research. As well as a considerable self-guided study and research focus, you will be encouraged to complete group tasks. You will develop a range of skills of analysis and interpretation as well as a wide range of transferable skills, both practical and intellectual.

Will I get practical experience?

You will carry out a large amount of practical work, as you complete assignments and put into practice different archaeological and scientific techniques. We frequently employ experiments in our teaching about ancient technologies (e.g. flint knapping, pot making, bronze smelting and casting). Our students complete at least four weeks’ practical work, usually during the first summer vacation, and we have excellent provision of technical equipment for field study, including GPS, total station theodolite and geophysical equipment.

Teaching hours

You will have between 1 and 3 hours of teaching per module per week and will need to allow for additional hours of private study. You should expect your total workload to average about 40 hours per week during term time, with at least 10 hours of this being contact time with staff.

Facilities

We have outstanding facilities that include: experimental archaeology laboratories; clean lab with fume cupboards for chemical work; a landscape archaeology project office, complete with giant scanner for maps and plans; microscope room equipped with high-spec microscopes and image processing facilities; a kiln room for ceramics and other experimental purposes; wet labs for artefact and environmental sample processing; sets of high and low-power teaching microscopes and state-of-the-art surveying equipment (including resistivity equipment, magnetometer, differential and hand-held GPS and total station theodolite and geophysical equipment). We also have extensive reference collections of artefacts, human skeletons, animal bones and plant remains.

Research-led teaching

Our teaching is inspired by the latest research, ensuring lectures are cutting-edge and you will benefit from access to the latest thinking, equipment and resources. All staff teach third year options, which are linked to their own area of research, which include topics such as bioarchaeology and Egyptology. You will be encouraged to participate in research projects and be able to choose a dissertation topic that contributes to original research to a project.

Academic support

All students have a Personal Tutor who is available for advice and support throughout your studies. You will also benefit from our first-year tutorial system, which will support you with your study methods and core skills. There are also several services on campus where you can get advice and information, including the Students’ Guild Advice Unit.

Assessment

You will be assessed by a variety of methods. Some modules require you to sit exams, whilst others are assessed by essays and projects. Practical modules are examined by the preparation of written reports, portfolios of work, oral presentations, practical assignments, fieldwork notebooks, or take-away papers to allow time for research and perhaps appropriate field or museum visits.

You must pass your first year in order to progress to the second year: these results do not count towards your degree classification. The assessments in the second year, year abroad (if applicable) and final year will contribute to your final degree classification.

Optional modules outside of this course

Each year, if you have optional modules available, you can take up to 30 credits in a subject outside of your course. This can increase your employability and widen your intellectual horizons.

Proficiency in a second subject

If you complete 60 credits of modules in one of the subjects below, you may have the words 'with proficiency in [e.g. Social Data Science]' added to your degree title when you graduate.

  • A Foreign Language
  • Data Science
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Innovation
  • Law
  • Leadership
  • Social Data Science

Find out more about proficiency options

Expand text

Your future

Employer-valued skills this course develops

Archaeology combines humanities and scientific disciplines, providing good opportunities to develop the skills that are attractive to employers. This course is designed to develop your skills of analysis, assessment and interpretation, as well as the production of written and oral reports. Teamwork, problem solving, analysis, research, presentation and organisational skills are all developed through a programme that is both practical and theoretical. Your employability skills are also enhanced through a range of careers initiatives we offer that are specific to the profession, including ‘professional modules’ involving work experience.

Career support

We have a dedicated, award-winning Careers Service, ensuring you have access to careers advisors, mentors and the tools you need to succeed in finding employment in your chosen field on graduation. The Exeter Award and the Exeter Leaders Award schemes encourage you to participate in employability related workshops, skills events, volunteering and employment which will contribute to your career decision-making skills and success in the employment market. Our graduates compete very successfully in the employment market, with many employers targeting the University when recruiting new graduates.

Career paths

The broad-based skills acquired during your degree will give you an excellent grounding for a wide variety of careers, not only those related to archaeology but also in wider fields such as teaching, media and business. Examples of roles recent graduates are now working as include:

  • Anatomical Pathologist Technologist
  • Archaeological Researcher
  • Campaigns Officer
  • Intern Ranger
  • Field Archaeologist
  • Museum Digital Archive Assistant
  • Quality Coordinator
  • Rural Policy Adviser
  • Site Assistant
  • Solutions Coordinator

Further study

Many of our students successfully progress to postgraduate study or training in a range of areas. Recent graduates have progressed to postgraduate courses in:

  • Anthrozoology
  • Experimental Archaeology
  • International Relations
  • Classics and Ancient History
  • Heritage Management

Expand text