Skip to main content

Undergraduate Study

BA English and History - 2025 entry

Please note: The below is for 2025 entries. Click here for 2024 entries.
UCAS code QV01
Duration 3 years
Entry year 2025
Campus Streatham Campus
Discipline English
Contact

Web: Enquire online
Phone: 0300 555 6060 (UK callers) 
+44 (0)1392 723044 (EU/International callers)

Typical offer

View full entry requirements

A-Level: ABB
IB: 32/655
BTEC: DDM

Contextual offers

A-Level: BBC
IB: 28
BTEC: DMM

Overview

  • Immerse yourself in literature spanning from the Middle Ages to the 21st Century, whilst exploring the historical context in which texts were written
  • Delve into fascinating history from the Roman Empire to indigenous people in Latin America, or the Vikings, magic, and witchcraft in early modern Europe
  • Take advantage of our excellent facilities, such as our Special Collections relating to world-renowned writers, the Bill Douglas Cinema Museum, which is a unique film and popular culture resource, and our Digital Humanities Lab. Exeter has also recently been awarded UNESCO City of Literature status
  • Customise your degree to your interests and career ambitions with an array of exciting modules spanning the breadth of History and English
  • Boost your employability with sought-after, advanced skills in communication, critical thinking, developing ideas and arguments, and interpreting information.

View 2024 Entry

Request a prospectus

Open Days and visiting us

How to apply

Contact

Web: Enquire online

Phone: +44 (0)1392 72 72 72

Top 10 in the UK for English

9th in The Times and The Sunday Times Good University Guide 2024

Top 50 in the world for English Language and Literature

QS World University Subject Rankings 2024

Unique on-site resources: Exeter’s Special Collections archive and the Bill Douglas Cinema Museum

Top 100 in world subject rankings for History

QS World University Subject Rankings 2024

History has always been my favourite subject. The wide range of module choices has allowed me to study a range of very interesting time periods and topics, and I have been given the opportunity to learn a new language which I am thoroughly enjoying.

I would recommend Exeter to anyone who would like to be taken out of their comfort zone. I have learnt a lot about myself by attending this institution.

I have thoroughly enjoyed diving deeper into medieval periods that I was unable to cover at school. Unlike some other history courses, Exeter’s course is not Eurocentric, and there are many modules covering different areas of world history. For example, I am currently studying a module on Islamic history.

Read more from Hanife

Hanife

BA History (Exeter)

Entry requirements (typical offer)

Qualification Typical offer Required subjects
A-Level ABB B in English Literature or English Literature & Language
IB 32/655 HL5 in English Literature or English Literature & Language
BTEC DDM Applicants studying a BTEC Extended Diploma will also require GCE AL English Literature or English Literature & Language Grade B
GCSE C or 4 English Language
Access to HE 24 L3 Credits at Distinction Grade and 21 L3 credits at Merit Grade. To include at least 12 L3 credits at Merit Grade in an acceptable English Literature subject area.
T-Level Distinction Applicants studying a T-Level will also require GCE AL English Literature or English Literature & Language grade B
Contextual Offer

A-Level: BBC
IB: 28
BTEC: DMM

Specific subject requirements must still be achieved where stated above. Find out more about contextual offers.

Other accepted qualifications

View other accepted qualifications

English language requirements

International students need to show they have the required level of English language to study this course. The required test scores for this course fall under Profile B2. Please visit our English language requirements page to view the required test scores and equivalencies from your country.

NB General Studies is not included in any offer.

Grades advertised on each programme webpage are the typical level at which our offers are made and provide information on any specific subjects an applicant will need to have studied in order to be considered for a place on the programme. However, if we receive a large number of applications for the programme we may not be able to make an offer to all those who are predicted to achieve/have achieved grades which are in line with our typical offer. For more information on how applications are assessed and when decisions are released, please see: After you apply

Course content

You will explore the work of some of the giants of English literature and go on an exciting journey across a diverse range of Anglophone literatures. You will read works of literature spanning the Middle Ages to the 21st century in their historical context, learning how and why certain literary forms emerged when they did. We will introduce you to traditional and emerging cultural forms from novels to digital culture and expose you to writers from across the globe. 

Our history expertise covers areas such as migration and mobility, indigenous peoples in Latin America, the history of health and its politics, women in society, the Vikings, magic and witchcraft in early modern Europe, and histories of material things. In your final year you will have the opportunity to delve into a topic that interests you for your History Research Project. 

You will have the flexibility to choose History and English modules that complement each other, enabling you to fully immerse yourself in the real world behind the story. 

45 credits of compulsory History modules, 30 credits of compulsory English modules, 15 credits of optional History modules, 30 credits of optional English modules.

Compulsory modules

Subject to choosing 120 credits for the stage overall, you must:

Take EAS1035 (30 credits)

Take HIH1137 (15 credits)

a  Take EITHER HIH1421 (30 credits) OR HIH1422 (30 credits)

 

CodeModule Credits
EAS1035 Beginnings: English Literature before 1800 30
HIH1137 Becoming a Historian: Core 15
HIH1421 Understanding Medieval and Early Modern History see note a above30
HIH1422 Understanding Modern History see note a above30

Optional modules

Select 30 credits from this list of optional English modules

Select 15 credits from this list of optional History modules.

CodeModule Credits
English Stage 1 CH Option Modules 2024-5
EAS1037 The Novel 15
EAS1038 The Poem 15
EAS1041 Rethinking Shakespeare 15
EAS1044 Imagine This: Prompts for Creative Writing 15
EAS1016 Digital Creativity 15
History Stage 1 UG options 2024-5
HIH1014 The Body in Eighteenth-Century Britain 15
HIH1043 The Collapse of Communism in Central-Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union 15
HIH1138 Medieval, Manufactured? Uses and Reuses of the Middle Ages 15
HIH1411 From Wigan Pier to Piccadilly: Britain between the Wars 15
HIH1501 The Viking Phenomenon 15
HIH1505 The First Crusade 15
HIH1506 The First Day of the Somme 15
HIH1586 Early Modern Venice: Representations and Myths 15
HIH1597 Serfdom in Late Medieval England 15
HIH1614 Environment and Industry, 1750-1950: Global Perspectives 15
HIH1616 Producing Poverty: Peasants in a Global Perspective, 700-1300CE 15
HIH1618 Body, Border, Partition: Understanding Violence in South Asia 15

60 credits English option modules. 60 credits History options

 

Optional modules

Select 30-60 credits from this list of optional English modules. English modules in stage 2 are divided into three groups. Combined Honours students may not take more than one module from each group.

Group 1, modules concerned with pre-1750 literature

Group 2, modules concerned with post-1750 literature

Group 3, modules not concerned with a particular historical period.

 

Select 60 credits from a single History Route A, B, C or D . You must take HIH2237 Doing History in the Digital Age if you intend to select HIH3005 History Dissertation or HIH3006 Research Dissertation in the final stage.

History Route A
2 History Option modules. English/ Creative Writing Dissertation in final stage

History Route B
HIH2002 Uses of the Past + 1 other History option. English/ Creative Writing Dissertation in final stage

History Route C
HIH2237 Doing History in the Digital Age + 1 other History Option. History Dissertation in final stage

History Route D
HIH2237 Doing History in the Digital Age + HIH2002 Uses of the Past. History Dissertation in final stage

CodeModule Credits
English Stage 2 Pre-1750 Option Modules 2024-5 Pre-1750 English options
EAS2026 Desire and Power: English Literature 1570-1640 30
EAS2036 Theatrical Cultures in Early Modern England 30
EAS2071 Chaucer and His Contemporaries 30
EAS2080 Renaissance and Revolution 30
EAS2102 Satire and the City: English Literature 1660-1750 30
English Stage 2 Post-1750 Option Modules 2024-5 Post-1750 English options
EAF2510 Adaptation: Text, Image, Culture 30
EAS2029 Revolutions and Evolutions 19C Writings 30
EAS2103 Modernism and Modernity: Literature 1900-1960 30
EAS2104 Crossing the Water: Transatlantic Literary Relations 30
EAS2106 Romanticism 30
EAS2116 Empire of Liberty: American Literature of the Long Nineteenth Century 30
English Stage 2 Neutral Option Modules 2024-5 Neutral English options
EAS2031 Creative Writing: Building a Story 30
EAS2032 Creative Writing: Making a Poem 30
EAS2089 Creative Industries: Their Past, Our Future 30
EAS2090 Humanities after the Human: Further Adventures in Critical Theory 30
EAS2113 Culture, Crisis and Ecology in a Postcolonial World 30
AHV2018 Comics Studies: Histories, Methodologies, Genres 30
History Stage 2 UG options Route A 2024-5 History Route A
HIH2014A Decolonisation and the Collapse of the British Empire, 1919-1968 30
HIH2032A Europe 1650-1800: From Enlightenment to Romanticism 30
HIH2036A Albion's Fatal Tree: Capital Punishment in England, 1688-1965 30
HIH2186A Deviants and Dissenters in Early Modern England 30
HIH2209A African American History 30
HIH2218A Religion, Society and Culture in Tudor England 30
HIH2224A African Modernities: Popular Cultures in Twentieth Century Africa 30
HIH2234 Sailors, Slavery and Piracy: The Atlantic World, 1600 - 1800 30
HIH2590 An Age of Iron? Europe in the Tenth Century 30
HIH2592 Science, Empire, and Natural History Museums: A Global Perspective 30
HIH2587 The Other Renaissance: Religion, Knowledge, and Power in the Twelfth Century 30
HIH2011A Forgetting Fascism, Remembering Communism: Memory in Modern Europe 30
HIH2037 American Frontiers: The West in U.S. History and Mythology 30
HIH2137A Inventing Modern Man: Constructions of Mind, Body, and the Individual, 1400-1800 30
HIH2138A History of Development: Ideologies, Politics, and Projects 30
HIH2145A Spain from Absolutism to Democracy 30
HIH2179A The American Empire 30
HIH2185A China in the World, 1500-1840 30
HIH2208A Medieval Paris 30
HIH2233 The British World c.1860-1975 30
HIH2591 Philip Augustus and the Making of France, 1180-1223 30
History Stage 2 UG options Route B 2024-5 History Route B
HIH2002 Uses of the Past 30
HIH2037 American Frontiers: The West in U.S. History and Mythology 30
HIH2137A Inventing Modern Man: Constructions of Mind, Body, and the Individual, 1400-1800 30
HIH2138A History of Development: Ideologies, Politics, and Projects 30
HIH2145A Spain from Absolutism to Democracy 30
HIH2179A The American Empire 30
HIH2185A China in the World, 1500-1840 30
HIH2208A Medieval Paris 30
HIH2233 The British World c.1860-1975 30
HIH2591 Philip Augustus and the Making of France, 1180-1223 30
HIH2011A Forgetting Fascism, Remembering Communism: Memory in Modern Europe 30
History Stage 2 UG options Route C 2024-5 History Route C
HIH2237 Doing History in the Digital Age 30
HIH2014A Decolonisation and the Collapse of the British Empire, 1919-1968 30
HIH2032A Europe 1650-1800: From Enlightenment to Romanticism 30
HIH2036A Albion's Fatal Tree: Capital Punishment in England, 1688-1965 30
HIH2186A Deviants and Dissenters in Early Modern England 30
HIH2209A African American History 30
HIH2218A Religion, Society and Culture in Tudor England 30
HIH2224A African Modernities: Popular Cultures in Twentieth Century Africa 30
HIH2234 Sailors, Slavery and Piracy: The Atlantic World, 1600 - 1800 30
HIH2590 An Age of Iron? Europe in the Tenth Century 30
HIH2592 Science, Empire, and Natural History Museums: A Global Perspective 30
HIH2587 The Other Renaissance: Religion, Knowledge, and Power in the Twelfth Century 30
History Stage 2 UG options Route D 2024-5 History Route D
HIH2237 Doing History in the Digital Age 30
HIH2002 Uses of the Past 30

Typically, any placement year will take place in Year 3. If you are not taking a placement year please see the Final Year modules for year 3.

With Study Abroad

120 credits of optional modules, as approved by the Academic Study Abroad Coordinator.

For your year abroad you will agree a suite of modules in your host institution with the Study Abroad Coordinator. Details of individual modules that may be taken whilst abroad can be found by accessing the partner institution’s website navigating to the modules on offer for incoming exchange students.

Compulsory modules

CodeModule Credits
HUM3999 Year Abroad 120

With Employment Experience

120 credit compulsory placement module

Compulsory modules

CodeModule Credits
HUM3998 Employment Experience UK 120

With Employment Experience Abroad

120 credit compulsory placement module

Compulsory modules

CodeModule Credits
HUM3997 Employment Experience Abroad 120

30 credits of compulsory modules, 90 credits of optional modules

Subject to choosing 120 credits for the stage overall, you must:

Select a Dissertation in either English or Creative Writing or History: EAS3003/EAS3122/EAS3510 or HIH3005 or HIH3005 History Research Project Dissertation (you cannot choose more than one module from this group). To select either History Dissertation (HIH3005 or HIH3006), you must have taken HIH2237 Doing History in a Digital Age at stage 2.

Compulsory modules

History Route A or B taken in Stage 2 - Select EAS3003 Dissertation OR EAS3122 Creative Writing Dissertation OR EAS3510 Project-Based Dissertation.

History Route C or D taken in Stage 2– Select either HIH3005 General Third-Year Dissertation OR HIH3006 History Research Project Dissertation.

CodeModule Credits
EAS3003 Dissertation History Route A or B30
EAS3122 Creative Writing Dissertation History Route A or B30
EAS3510 Dissertation by Collaborative Project History Route A or B30
HIH3005 General Third-Year Dissertation History Route C or D30
HIH3006 Research Project Dissertation History Route C or D30

Optional modules

History Route A or B taken in Stage 2 - Select one 30 Credit English/Creative Writing optional module. Select a History Special Subject for 60 credits.

History Route C or D taken in stage 2 - You must select 30 credits from History Concepts Modules, or 30 credits of optional modules from outside History via modularity.  Select 60 credits of English/Creative Writing optional modules.

If choosing optional modules outside your named subjects, you must make sure that your total for both History and English is 90 credits each over the second and final year. This is to ensure you meet the requirements needed for the degree title.

CodeModule Credits
English Final Stage Option Modules 2024-5 English Options
EAS3128 Writing the Short Film 30
EAS3131 Advanced Critical Theory 30
EAS3167 James Joyce's Ulysses 30
EAS3181 Visual and Literary Cultures of Realism 30
EAS3182 Encountering the Other in Medieval Literature 30
EAS3191 Writing for Children and Young Adults 30
EAS3198 The Death of the Novel 30
EAS3219 Virginia Woolf: Fiction, Feeling, Form 30
EAS3225 'Reader, I Married Him': The Evolution of Romance Fiction from 1740 to the Present 30
EAS3235 American Modern 30
EAS3237 The Rise of Science 30
EAS3241 Harlem and After: African American Literature 1925-present 30
EAS3245 The 21st Century Museum 30
EAS3252 Poison, Filth, Trash: Modernism, Censorship and Resistance 30
EAS3311 Piracy in Early Modern Literature, 1570-1730 30
EAS3408 Poetry and Politics 30
EAS3414 Jane Austen: In and Out of Context 30
EAS3415 The Development of British Childrens Literature 30
EAS3416 Feeling Bodies: Emotions in Early Modern Literature and Culture, 1500-1700 30
EAS3417 Sex, Scandal and Sensation in Victorian Literature 30
EAS3419 Writing South Asia 30
EAS3420 Staging Space: Dramatic Geography and Audience Experience 30
EAS3421 Picturing the Global City: Literature and Visual Culture in the 21st Century 30
EAS3502 Shakespeare and Crisis 30
EAS3503 Migration, Literature and Culture 30
EAS3501 Fiction Matters 30
EAS3100 Hardy and Women Who Did: the Coming of Modernity 30
EAS3507 Writing Song Lyrics 30
EAS3500 American Counterculture in Literature 30
EAS3152 Heroes and Exiles: English Poetry of the Age of Beowulf 30
EAS3504 Surrealism and its Legacies 30
History UG Final Year Special Subjects 2024-5 History Special Subjects
HIH3415 Everyday Stalinism: Life in the Soviet Union, 1928-53 60
HIH3416 Critics of Empire 60
HIH3417 The Yes, Minister Files: Perspectives on British Government since 1914 60
HIH3422 Street Protest and Social Movements in the Modern Era 60
HIH3426 Health and its Politics in the 20th Century 60
HIH3430 From the Grand Tour to Gladiator: Modern encounters with the ancient world 60
HIH3433 Beyond Cannibalism: Indigenous Peoples and the European Colonisation of Brazil, 1500-1822 60
HIH3434 The Body in Early Modern England 60
HIH3436 Engendering Empire: Making the British Imperial World 60
HIH3437 Death to the Traitors: Rebellion and Resisting Tyranny in the Middle Ages 60
HIH3438 The Rise of Capitalism in Britain 1660-1830 60
HIH3439 Women's Experience in Britain: Race, Class and Gender since 1945 60
HIH3441 Britons Abroad: The Experience of Travel, c. 1650-1900 60
HIH3442 From Its Cradle to Its Grave? The National Health Service in Britain, 1948-Present 60
HIH3444 Them and Us: Imagining the Social "Other" in Britain since the 1880s 60
HIH3448 Britain in an Age of Revolution: War, Society and Culture, 1789-1815 60
HIH3450 Decolonisation and Colonial Conflict 60
HIH3451 Borders and Mobilities in Postcolonial South Asia 60
HIH3452 Whiteness: A Global History 60
History UG Final Stage Concepts History Concepts
HIH3329 The Future of History 30
HIH3330 Communications 30
HIH3331 Elites 30
HIH3332 Sexualities 30
HIH3333 Heroes 30
HIH3334 Civil Wars 30
HIH3335 Violence 30
HIH3336 Revolutions 30
HIH3337 Race 30

Course variants

UCAS code: QV02

Our four-year ‘with Study Abroad’ degree offers you the possibility of spending your third year abroad, studying with one of our many partner universities.

Why study abroad?

Living and studying in a different country is an exciting experience that broadens your academic and cultural horizons, as well as giving you the opportunity to widen your circle of friends. Students who have studied abroad demonstrate initiative, independence, motivation and, depending on where they stay, may also have gained a working knowledge of another language – all key qualities that employers are looking for in today’s competitive employment environment.

Where can I study abroad?

We have partnership arrangements with many prestigious institutions across the globe. Exactly where you can apply to study will depend on the subjects you are studying at Exeter. For a full list please visit the Study Abroad website.

Does it count towards my degree?

Credit for academic work during your year abroad is arranged by agreement between the University of Exeter and the host institution. These marks are then translated back into your degree at Exeter. If you are studying abroad for a semester or full year, your time abroad will count toward your final degree. Please refer to your Study Abroad co-ordinator for further details.

How does it affect my tuition fee and funding?

For the year that you spend studying abroad you will pay a significantly reduced tuition fee to Exeter, but nothing to your host university – for more information visit our fees pages. If you were previously eligible, you will continue to receive a maintenance loan whilst on your Study Abroad year.

UCAS code: QV03

Our four-year ‘with Employment Experience’ degree, offers you the possibility of spending your third year carrying out a graduate-level work placement or placements within the UK as part of your degree.

Why choose to include Employment Experience?

Undertaking graduate-level work during your degree unlocks a world of experience that allows you to develop essential employability and interpersonal skills that relate to your degree and future career. A work placement will dramatically boost your confidence, enhance your CV and develop graduate-level skills and competencies that employers are looking for.

Where will I do my work placement?

The sector you choose to work within is very much your choice as you will be responsible for finding and organising your placement. We will provide plenty of guidance and support during your first and second years which will prepare you to research and apply for placements. Ultimately, the university will give final approval to your placement to make sure you have a valuable experience.

How does it affect my tuition fees and funding?

For your ‘Year In Industry’ you will pay a significantly reduced tuition fee to Exeter – for more information visit our fees pages. If you were previously eligible, you will continue to receive a maintenance loan whilst on your year of work placement/s.

Find out more

Visit our website to learn more about employment experience opportunities. 

UCAS code: QV04

Our four-year ‘with Employment Experience Abroad’ degree offers you the possibility of spending your third year abroad, carrying out a graduate-level work placement or placements as part of your degree.

Why choose to include Employment Experience Abroad?

Spending up to a year living and working in a different country is an exciting experience that broadens your academic and cultural horizons, as well as giving you the opportunity to widen your circle of friends. By carrying out a graduate-level work placement or placements abroad you can demonstrate to employers your adaptability, cultural awareness, independence and resourcefulness and, depending on where you stay, may also have gained a working knowledge of another language.

Where will I do my work placement?

The sector and country you choose to work within is very much your choice as you will be responsible for finding and organising your placement. We will provide plenty of guidance and support during your first and second years which will prepare you to research and apply for placements. Ultimately, the university will give final approval to your placement to make sure you have a valuable experience.

How does it affect my tuition fee?

For your ‘Year In Industry’ you will pay a significantly reduced tuition fee to Exeter – for more information visit our fees pages. If you were previously eligible, you will continue to receive a maintenance loan whilst on your year of work placement/s.

Is the placement paid?

You will be paid in accordance with the rules of the country you work in and there may be visa restrictions or requirements which you need to consider when applying.

Find out more

Visit our website to learn more about employment experience opportunities.

Fees

Tuition fees for 2024 entry

UK students: £9,250 per year
International students: £23,700 per year

Scholarships

The University of Exeter has many different scholarships available to support your education, including £5 million in scholarships for international students, such as our Global Excellence Scholarships*. Financial support is also available for students from disadvantaged backgrounds, lower income households and other under-represented groups to help them access, succeed and progress through higher education.

* Terms and conditions apply. See online for details.

Find out more about tuition fees and scholarships

Learning and teaching

How will I learn?

As well as lectures, seminars and tutorials led by internationally respected academics at the forefront of research, you'll engage in group tasks and independent study: reading or viewing module material, writing essays or preparing for seminars and presentations.

We encourage presentation work and written coursework, because it involves you actively in the teaching and learning process and develops important transferable skills such as good verbal and visual communication, as well as effective interaction with other people. You will also develop a range of professional skills, such as time management and team working, plus valuable critical and analytical skills.

Modules

Our history modules encourage you to think about long-term developments and processes of historical change, and to make comparisons between countries and cultures. We emphasise historical questions that require you to identify patterns across time or between countries, and to isolate common or competing trends, instead of concentrating on short-term or single explanations.

Likewise our English modules enable you to deeply investigate the work of some of the giants of English literature, as well as discovering more unusual works from the past and engaging literary and cultural works from the contemporary moment.

Teaching hours

You’ll have on average 1-3 teaching hours per module per week, and will need to allow for up to nine additional hours of private study. You should expect your total workload to average about 40 hours per week during term time.

As well as attending lectures and writing essays and assignments, you’ll be expected to make presentations in seminars or tutorials. We encourage your presentation work, because it involves you actively in the teaching and learning process and develops important life skills, such as good verbal and visual communication and effective interaction with other people.

Personal tutor

You'll have a personal tutor as well as tutors in individual subjects and they will work with you to monitor your progress, as well as offering pastoral support and other help. You will have a chance to make your mark on the programmes through regular student evaluations and participation in the Student-Staff Liaison Committees and relevant subject societies on both campuses.

How will I be assessed?

All our degrees have assessments and examinations each year. Although formal examinations are important tests of skill, up to 50% of your marks will come from other forms of assessment, including coursework essays, projects, dissertations and measures of your skill in presentation and oral work. The exact balance will depend on the modules you choose, and you’ll be informed of the methods of assessment before making your choices.

Progression

You must pass your first-year assessment in order to progress to the second year, but the results do not count towards your degree classification. For three-year courses, the assessments in the second and third years contribute to your final degree classification. For four-year courses, the assessments in the second, third and fourth years all contribute to your final degree classification.

Optional modules outside of this course

Each year, if you have optional modules available, you can take up to 30 credits in a subject outside of your course. This can increase your employability and widen your intellectual horizons.

Proficiency in a second subject

If you complete 60 credits of modules in one of the subjects below, you may have the words 'with proficiency in [e.g. Social Data Science]' added to your degree title when you graduate.

  • A Foreign Language
  • Data Science
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Innovation
  • Law
  • Leadership
  • Social Data Science

Find out more about proficiency options

Expand text

Facilities

Students in the Bill Douglas Cinema Museum

We are exceptionally lucky to have some fantastic facilities and resources on the Streatham Campus.

Special Collections

We have Special Collections relating to writers such as Agatha Christie, Daphne du Maurier, and William Golding, and we integrate these into our teaching so students can share the excitement we have when discovering new insights from manuscripts, letters, and business papers.

The Bill Douglas Cinema Museum

Our unique film and popular culture resource, contains items going back hundreds of years. We regularly take students into its archives and think about the study of literature in relation to visual texts.

Digital Humanities Lab

Digital Humanities is increasingly important in all areas of humanities research, including history, archaeology, literatures and languages. This research space enables the examination, preservation and analysis of historical, literary and visual material. Facilities in the lab include:

  • a flagship seminar room equipped with a 4.2-metre video wall, encouraging interactive engagement in a shared display space
  • two state-of-the-art photography labs, including provision for the 2D digitisation of heritage material and primary sources
  • an audio-visual lab with a recording studio and sound editing suite
  • a MakerSpace equipped with 3D scanning and printing equipment

Whilst my studies here at the University of Exeter have been incredible (I cannot speak highly enough of my English course), my time at Exeter has been defined by what I do away from the books.

I have taken managerial roles within societies, broadening my circle of peers and allowing me to develop my leadership skills. Not only have I been involved in voluntary positions, the University’s broad internship programme has allowed me to take paid work in the Digital Humanities Labs, assisting academics on world leading research and pioneering and fostering new relationships between the University and the rest of the world.

This internship has let me interact with texts like the first edition of William Golding’s ‘Lord of the Flies’ (with the rarely seen first chapter) and even taken me to Canada, all of which is incredible experience, and will stand me in good stead for further study. I chose the study abroad option at Deakin University in Melbourne, Australia, as I believe that having international experience is key to success as work between countries continues to become more globally significant and the world is becoming smaller through communication and travel,’ 

Read more from Connor

Connor

BA English with Study Abroad (Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia)

Your future

Employer-valued skills this course develops

A degree in English and History equips you with a range of complementary skills that will put you in a great position to succeed in a range of careers. Alongside in-depth subject knowledge of both English and History, you will develop highly transferable skills in:

  • researching;
  • analysing and assessing primary and secondary sources;
  • written and verbal communication;
  • managing and interpreting information;
  • developing ideas and arguments;
  • teamwork;
  • problem solving;
  • and the ability to make informed decisions.

Through a balance of independent study and teamwork you will learn to manage your time and workload effectively.

Employer visits

We have a dedicated Careers Service, ensuring you have access to careers advisors, mentors and the tools you need to succeed in finding employment in your chosen field on graduation. We offer the Exeter Award and the Exeter Leaders Award which include employability-related workshops, skills events, volunteering and employment which will contribute to your career decision-making skills and success in the employment market.

Our graduates compete very successfully in the employment market, with many employers targeting the University when recruiting new graduates. For further information please visit our Careers Service pages.

Career paths

You will be equipped with skills that are attractive to employers and relevant for a wide range of careers, including graduate-level roles in the heritage and arts sectors as well as other fields of work, including education, retail management, recruitment, charities, finance and accounting, and journalism.

Example careers include:

  • Account Manager
  • Archivist and/or Librarian
  • Business Analyst
  • Civil Servant
  • Digital Marketing and Events Executive
  • Event Project Manager
  • Global Market
  • Researcher
  • Historian/teacher of History and/or English
  • Parliamentary Researcher
  • TV Researcher

Expand text