BA Sociology and Anthropology with Study Abroad

UCAS codeL3L7
Duration4 Years
Typical offerAAB-ABB; IB: 34-32
Discipline
  • Anthropology
  • Sociology
LocationTaught in Exeter Streatham (Exeter)

Overview

By studying Anthropology alongside Sociology, you can fully explore how relevant the discipline is for the study of our globalised world. Sociology aims to provide a critical understanding of society by examining a wide range of social activities from intimate personal relations to the apparently faceless operation of state bureaucracies. You will examine social, political, historical, cultural and economic issues and social groups such as families, companies, churches, crowds and political parties. Our Sociology modules cover diverse subjects including sport, music, media, cyborg studies and technology.

Anthropology’s comparative outlook and concern with cultural difference complements sociologists’ interest in the formation of social groups and the role of shared understanding in coordinating the actions of their members. Anthropology traditionally focused on the study of small-scale and pre-industrial societies but increasingly it has applied its distinctive insights to the problems of modern living. Anthropologists today are as interested in the practices of multinational companies and the impact of natural resource exploitation on local communities as in the rituals and ceremonies of native Amazonians.

Studying Anthropology with Sociology will equip you with a full range of critical analytical perspectives as well as research methods to start your own exploration of the nature and complexity of human social life. You’ll study core modules from both disciplines, and be able to choose from an excitingly diverse array of optional modules in your second and final years as well as undertaking a dissertation focused on either discipline.

You will spend the 3rd year of your studies in a partner University on an Erasmus/Socrates exchange or other approved programme of study.

 

Programme structure

The modules we outline here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand.

The Sociology and Anthropology degree programme is made up of compulsory (core) and optional modules, which are worth 15 or 30 credits each. Full-time undergraduate students need to complete modules worth a total of 120 credits each year. In combined honours degrees like this you will take an equal amount of credits from each subject.

Depending on your programme you can take up to 30 credits each year in another subject, for instance a language or business module, to develop career-related skills or just widen your intellectual horizons.

The third year is spent studying abroad at a partner institution.

Please note that modules offered are subject to change, depending on staff availability, timetabling, and demand.

Year 1

The first year gives you a foundational knowledge of sociological and anthropological theory and concepts, and how to think critically about the key challenges of studying diverse human societies. You will also gain important analytical techniques that will be useful across a range of subjects and research tasks.

Compulsory modules

CodeModuleCredits
SOC1037Introduction to Social Analysis: Classical Social Theory 15
SOC1038Introduction to Social Analysis: Contemporary Social Theory 15
SOC1019Contemporary Society: Themes and Perspectives 15
SOC1020Contemporary Society: Fields and Case Studies 15
ANT1005Introduction to Social Anthropology: Exploring Cultural Diversity 15
ANT1004Introduction to Social Anthropology: Theorising the Everyday World 15
ANT1003Imagining Social Worlds: Texts 15
ANT1008Imagining Social Worlds: Artefacts 15

Year 2

In the second year you will advance your grasp of sociological and anthropological knowledge and methods through a set of compulsory modules. Optional modules enable you to develop specialist knowledge on a range of topics.

Compulsory modules

CodeModuleCredits
SOC2005Theoretical Sociology 30
SOC2004Into the Field 15
ANT2002Ethnography Now 15
ANT2003Current Debates in Anthropology 15

Optional modules

30 credits from level 2 and/or level 3 sociology options, 30 credits from level 2 and/or level 3 anthropology options.

CodeModuleCredits
Sociology modules
SOC2050Knowing the Social: perception, memory and representation15
SOC3016Gender and Society30
SOC3028Media in Society15
SOC3029Sociology and Philosophy of Globalisation15
SOC3030Sociology of Art and Culture15
SOC3046AThe Holocaust, Genocide and Society30
SOC3084Ethnomusicology15
SOC3085Health, Illness and Bodies in Contemporary Society Part 1: Medicine and Social Control15
SOC3086Addiction 30
SOC3087Disability and Society15
SOC3088Health, Illness and Bodies in Contemporary Society: Part 2: Bodies in Society15
Anthropology modules
ANT3002Childhood 15
ANT3004Living cities: Migration, place and the politics of identities15
ANT3005Human-Animal Interactions15
ANT3006Anthropology of Africa15
ANT3029Sociology and Philosophy of Globalisation15
ANT3084Ethnomusicology15
ANT3085Health, Illness and Bodies in Contemporary Society Part 1: Medicine and Social Control15
ANT3086Addiction 30
ANT3087Disability and Society15
ANT3088Health, Illness and Bodies in Contemporary Society: Part 2: Bodies in Society15
ANT3089Cultures of Race, ethnicity and racism15
ANT3090Sound and Society 15

Year 3

Students spend this stage in a partner University on an Erasmus/Socrates exchange or other approved programme of study.

The year abroad comprises 120 credits. Assessment is based on the credits gained at the partner institution abroad.

Compulsory modules

CodeModuleCredits
SSI3999One Year study abroad 120

Year 4

The centre-point of the final year is the dissertation. This provides you with the opportunity to explore an area of interest and to demonstrate what you have learned over the previous years of your degree. You will also take up to three other specialist modules to create a programme of work fully reflecting your interests.

Compulsory modules

CodeModuleCredits
SOC3040Sociology Dissertation or ANT304030
ANT3040Anthropology Dissertation or SOC304030

Optional modules

If taking Sociology Dissertation, select a further 30 credits of Sociology options and 60 credits Anthropology options.

If taking Anthropology Dissertation, select a further 30 credits of Anthropology options and 60 credits Sociology options.

CodeModuleCredits
Sociology level 3 modules
SOC3016Gender and Society30
SOC3028Media in Society15
SOC3029Sociology and Philosophy of Globalisation15
SOC3030Sociology of Art and Culture15
SOC3046AThe Holocaust, Genocide and Society30
SOC3084Ethnomusicology15
SOC3085Health, Illness and Bodies in Contemporary Society Part 1: Medicine and Social Control15
SOC3086Addiction 30
SOC3087Disability and Society15
SOC3088Health, Illness and Bodies in Contemporary Society: Part 2: Bodies in Society15
Anthropology level 3 modules
ANT3002Childhood 15
ANT3004Living cities: Migration, place and the politics of identities15
ANT3005Human-Animal Interactions15
ANT3006Anthropology of Africa15
ANT3029Sociology and Philosophy of Globalisation15
ANT3084Ethnomusicology15
ANT3085Health, Illness and Bodies in Contemporary Society Part 1: Medicine and Social Control15
ANT3086Addiction 30
ANT3087Disability and Society15
ANT3088Health, Illness and Bodies in Contemporary Society: Part 2: Bodies in Society15
ANT3089Cultures of Race, ethnicity and racism15
ANT3090Sound and Society 15

Entry requirements 2017

Typical offer

AAB-ABB; IB: 34-32

Additional selection criteria

We are looking for well-qualified students with a genuine interest in and enthusiasm for the subject.

We receive a large number of applications from well-qualified applicants and may not be able to make offers to all those applicants who have achieved or are predicted to achieve grades in line with the typical offer shown above.

In addition to the specific requirements listed above, we look for excellent A level* results/predictions and we may also take into account results up to and including GCSEs* and AS Levels* as part of our holistic assessment of an application.

*Equivalent qualifications will be considered. For more information about our equivalencies for specific qualifications please contact our Admissions Office.

Programmes with Study Abroad

Entry for programmes ‘with Study Abroad’ is offered on the basis that you will spend your time abroad at an institution where the teaching and examining is delivered in English. However, we also have partners that teach in French, Spanish and German. Should you wish to study at one of these institutions you will need to take modules through the Foreign Language Centre up to ‘Advanced’ standard in the appropriate language. In order to reach this standard before the year abroad, students usually need to have entered the University with the equivalent of a good GCSE or AS level (or higher) in that language.

International students

International students should check details of our English language requirements and may be interested in our Foundation programmes.

Further information

Please read the important information about our Typical offer.

For full and up-to-date information on applying to Exeter and entry requirements, including requirements for other types of qualification, please see the Applying section.

Learning and teaching

You’ll learn through lectures, seminars and practical exercises, with an increasing emphasis on seminar discussion and project work in the second and third years. You should expect around 10 contact hours per week in Year 1 and will need to plan additional hours of private study per module. Your total workload should average about 40 hours per week during term time.

Regular tutorials will give you the opportunity to discuss oral and written assignments with your tutor, together with a small group of other students. These personal contacts are very important in developing staff-student relations and for getting to know your fellow students. Our programmes help to develop skills and understanding so that you can take increasing responsibility for your learning in more specialised seminar-based modules.

We’re actively engaged in introducing new methods of learning and teaching, including increasing use of interactive computer-based approaches to learning through our virtual learning environment where the details of all modules are stored in an easily navigable website. You can access detailed information about modules and learning outcomes and interact through activities such as the discussion forums.

You’ll have the opportunity to work closely with academic staff who are at the cutting edge of research and academic debate and you’ll benefit from an innovative curriculum inspired by leading research.

A Personal Tutor will be assigned to you to give advice and guide you through your studies. The Student-Staff Liaison Committee gives you the chance to discuss and review the degree programmes, including existing and planned module content, through regular meetings with departmental staff.

Our undergraduates have established a popular Sociology Society which meets several times a year and organises a seminar series with members of staff to provide an arena outside the formal teaching structure in which staff and students can discuss sociological issues.

Assessment

You must pass your first year assessment in order to progress to the second year, but the results do not count towards your degree classification. For three-year programmes, the assessments in the second and third years contribute to your final degree classification. For four-year programmes the assessments in the second, third and fourth years all contribute to your final degree classification.

Assessment includes formal exams and assessed coursework, including essays and projects as well as practical assignments and field work notebooks. Formal exams contribute about 40 per cent of your overall assessment.

Study abroad

You will spend the 3rd year of your studies in a partner University on an Erasmus/Socrates exchange or other approved programme of study.

Fieldwork

You will be introduced to methods of field work-based inquiry that are strongly featured within the qualitative traditions of sociology and anthropology. The Ethnography Now module, for example, focuses on learning through practical experimentation with ethnographic research which you’ll undertake within a field that you already inhabit-namely, the University campus.

You will also have the opportunity to participate in the Anthropology field trip to Skanda Vale, a Hindu and Multi Faith ashram and monastery in Wales.

The Anthropology field trip was a life changing experience for me. Beforehand, I was sceptical about the religious aspects of the community we lived among, questioning their escapism from the ‘real’ world. However, participating in everyday life alongside the monks and nuns was eye-opening; after a few days of getting used to their routine, and taking part in prayer sessions and community activities, I began to reflect on my own lack of belief and understand the importance of religion to them. It was also interesting to investigate their position on gender and equality which is typically different to what we experience in 21st-century Britain. It is hard to do justice to the experience of the field trip in words, so my advice would be to go and do it for yourself.

Isabelle Hoole, BA Sociology and Anthropology

Careers

Your brilliant career

Find out how we can help you build your brilliant career.

Our programmes not only give you an understanding of your subjects but also give you an excellent all round education. You will learn to understand other people's points of view, communicate your own position clearly and argue effectively. You will also learn to collect, assess and present evidence and to work independently and in groups.

You will learn transferable skills suitable for a wide range of careers such as social research, marketing, media and culture, human resources management, teaching, management, development work, social work, and working for the military and emergency services.

Developing your skills and career prospects

We provide a range of support to help you develop skills attractive to employers. As a student within the College of Social Sciences and International Studies, you will be able to access a range of specific activities such as careers skills sessions and employer-led events, or seek bespoke advice and support from our College Employability Officer. The University of Exeter's Employability and Graduate Development Service also organises a busy schedule of activities including careers fairs, skills workshops, and training events, and can advise on graduate opportunities and volunteering. Visit our employability web page for more information.

You have the option to undertake a work placement through the Learning from Work Experience in Social Sciences module (SSI2001).

You will be encouraged to research and reflect on a range of work-related questions such as the nature of an organisation and your role within it, employment practices including induction, health and safety procedures, self-appraisal and continuing professional development.

By practising specific skills for employment, including the writing of CVs, application forms and supporting statements, you will become better prepared for the world of work beyond university.

Contact us

Streatham Campus, Exeter

Email: ssis-admissions@exeter.ac.uk
Phone: +44 (0)1392 723192

Website: Visit the Sociology website