Skip to main content

Undergraduate Study

BA Communications and Modern Languages

UCAS code Q325
Duration 4 years
Entry year 2021
Contact

Web: Enquire online
Phone: 0300 555 6060 (UK callers) 
+44 (0)1392 723044 (EU/International callers)

Entry requirements

A levels: AAB - ABB
IB: 34 - 32
BTEC: DDD - DDM

View full entry requirements

Campus Streatham Campus
Discipline Communications

Overview

  • Combine a solid foundation in Communications with the study of a language and its culture.
  • You will hone practical and professional skills, equipping you to work across the creative industries or anywhere requiring people who understand how communications work.
  • Opportunity to experience different ways of learning, with specialist modules that cover everything from the history of communications and professional writing, to language and social interaction and global communications.
  • Excellent facilities on campus include our Special Collections relating to world-renowned writers, The Bill Douglas Cinema Museum which is a unique film and popular culture resource and our Digital Humanities Lab. Exeter has also recently been awarded UNESCO City of Literature status.
  • Spend your third year studying abroad in a country where you can develop your chosen language.

Unique on-site resources: Exeter’s Special Collections archive and The Bill Douglas Cinema Museum

Year abroad spent studying at a partner university or in employment

Communications: Taught by our Top 10 English department

Top 10 in The Times and The Sunday Times Good University Guide 2020, The Complete University Guide 2021 and The Guardian University Guide 2021

Top 200 in world subject rankings for Modern Languages and Cultures

QS World University Subject Rankings 2020

This exciting new programme of study combines the highest standards of academic rigour with innovative, practice-based learning in the broad area of global communications.

 Our course is wide ranging, flexible and gives students the chance to develop their own specialist areas of interest.

Read more from Professor Jo Gill

Professor Jo Gill

College of Humanities

Entry requirements

Qualification Required grades Required subjects
A-Level AAB - ABB Dependent on subjects chosen
IB 34 - 32 Dependent on subjects chosen
BTEC DDD - DDM Dependent on subjects chosen
GCSE C or 4 English Language
Contextual Offer

A-Level: BBB
IB: 30
BTEC: DDM

Specific requirements must still be achieved, therefore where a grade A is required, offers will be ABC or ACC. Find out more about contextual offers.

Other UK, EU and International equivalences

View UK, EU and International equivalences

NB General Studies is not included in any offer.

Language requirements

  • Grade B at A level is required in any language you intend to study from A level.
  • You may only choose one language.
  • Students wishing to pursue language study on the basis of a GCSE are normally classed as beginners.
  • French, German, Italian, Russian, and Spanish can be studied either from A level or beginner’s level, with both cohorts reaching degree level in the final year. Portuguese and Chinese can normally only be studied from beginner’s level, not from A Level; students of these two languages reach degree level in final year.

Languages and levels available for Combined Honours courses

I want to study a new language at beginner level alongside my other subject (excluding programmes with Arabic)

Modern Languages requirements GCSE grade B/grade 5 (or equivalent) in any Modern Foreign Language
Advanced level languages available n/a
Beginners level languages available Chinese (Mandarin); French; German; Italian; Portuguese; Russian; Spanish

I want to study my A level (or equivalent) language at advanced level alongside my other subject (including programmes with Arabic)

Modern Languages requirements A level grade B or IB HL 5 (or equivalent) in the language chosen at advanced level
Advanced level languages available French; German; Italian; Russian; Spanish
Beginners level languages available n/a

Completing your UCAS form

In the section named ‘further details’ on your UCAS application form please indicate in the ‘choices’ field the language and route you wish to study using the abbreviations below, separated by a space:

French Fren
Chinese (Mandarin) Chin
German Germ
Italian Ital
Portuguese Port
Russian Russ
Spanish Span

Read more

Course content

At each level, students will be able to choose from a portfolio of optional modules from within the College and beyond, meaning that they will not be restricted to one concept or experience of “Communications” and will, from early on, be able to plot their own route through a wide-ranging and flexible programme.

Communications: Year 1 of the programme offers a combination of compulsory modules (covering conceptual and applied approaches to Communications and enabling students to develop their critical and analytical skills) and options. Here, as throughout, students will have opportunity to learn or improve a second or further language via modularity.

In year 2, students will take a “Professional Writing” module, and they will undertake a guided work placement (“Communications in the Workplace” – 15 or 30 credit version).

Your year abroad will take place in Year 3.

In the final year, students may take a specialist Communications option or other options relating to Communications but drawn from a range of fields; they will also take either a Communications Dissertation or a Communications Practical Project.

Your year abroad

Study/Work Abroad in Year 3

A pivotal part of all Modern Language programmes is the year spent abroad, either studying at one of our prestigious partner universities, teaching on a British Council placement, or working in other employment. By immersing yourself in the culture you study, you will not only enhance your language skills, but cultivate:

  • strong intercultural understanding
  • improved communication skills
  • the ability to think and study in different ways
  • resilience and confidence
  • analytical skills and the ability to make cross-cultural comparisons
  • adaptability, independence and valuable life experience

During your Year Abroad, you will still be registered as an Exeter student and therefore supported in several ways. You will retain your personal tutor and be expected to keep in contact with them. You will also have the support of the Exeter Global Opportunities team for advice on any matter.

You will need to decide how to spend your Year Abroad during the first half of the second year. We will help you in the process. During your first year you will be invited to an introductory presentation about your Year Abroad options. In your second year, there is an extensive orientation programme to help you prepare for your Year Abroad.

Ways to spend the Year Abroad

  • You must spend 7-15 months abroad, maximising the opportunities available to you
  • You can work, study, or split the year on two or more placements
  • Students going to China or Russia can currently only study (work abroad is not available)
  • If you study Portuguese, the only options available are study or work abroad (not a British Council assistantship)

Study Abroad

Studying abroad offers a range of possibilities, with over 40 different partner universities worldwide available to Modern Languages students. This can provide you with the opportunity to experience a different academic environment with local and other international students broadening your knowledge of the language and culture you study.

Work Abroad

Internships are very rewarding in that they can offer you valuable workplace experience. Placements can be sourced via our Global Opportunities webpages, but you can also source your own internship externally, though it must be approved by the Global Opportunities team. Some of our students have spent their Year Abroad working in translation, tourism, marketing, fashion, commerce, journalism, heritage and many other sectors.

British Council English Language Assistantship

Becoming an English Language Assistant with the British Council is a brilliant opportunity to explore both the world of working and, more specifically, the idea of working as a teacher. An academic year is spent supporting teachers in a primary or secondary school in the country of the language you are studying.

Does it count towards my degree?

The Year Abroad is an assessed year and the marks obtained count towards your final degree classification. If you begin a language in your first year at Exeter and intend to take that language in your final year, we strongly recommend you spend the majority of your Year Abroad in a country where that language is spoken. If you would like to arrange the year differently, you should first speak with the Programme Director for your language and/or the Study Abroad Officer.

How does it affect my tuition fee and funding?

For your Year Abroad you will pay a significantly reduced tuition fee to Exeter – for more information visit our fees pages. You will also continue to receive any Student Finance support for which you are eligible. Other financial support may also be available for certain students.

Read more

Fees

Tuition fees for 2021 entry

UK students: £9,250 per year
International students: £19,500 per year

Scholarships

The University of Exeter is offering scholarships to the value of over £4 million for students starting with us in September 2021. Details of scholarships, including our Global Excellence scholarships for international fee paying students, can be found on our dedicated funding page.

Find out more about tuition fees and funding

Learning and teaching

How will I learn?

The nature of learning at university involves considerable self-guided study and research. You will be taught through a combination of lectures and discussion-based seminars. We also support the development of team-based learning by organising students into study groups, and we make full use of both traditional learning resources and our virtual learning environment. Lecturers and tutors are all available to provide further support in one-to-one consultations.

Most of your work will be done in group and self-directed study: reading or viewing module material, writing essays or preparing for your seminars. Active participation in seminars develops important transferable skills such as good verbal and visual communication and effective interaction with other people. You will also develop a range of professional abilities, such as time management and team working, plus valuable critical, analytical and communication skills.

We are actively engaged in introducing new methods of learning and teaching, including the increasing use of interactive computer-based approaches to learning. Through our virtual learning environment, you can access detailed information about modules, and interact through activities such as discussion forums. You will also have access to online subscription databases and websites, such as Early English Books Online (EEBO), Eighteenth Century Collections Online (ECCO), MLA FirstSearch and JSTOR.

How will I be assessed?

You will be assessed in a variety of ways but primarily through exams and coursework. Coursework includes essays, a dissertation and presentation work. The ratio of formal exam to coursework is on average 40:60. Your first year doesn’t count towards your final degree classification, but you do have to pass it in order to progress.

Other/Extra-curricular opportunities

We provide an exciting range of special lectures and seminars by visiting academics and renowned writers, actors and film directors. In addition to your academic work, the student-run English Society organises book and poetry readings, film screenings and social events, providing an opportunity to meet students who share a love of literature, culture and the arts. Students from the English department are always active on the University student newspapers, radio and TV station and in the University’s drama groups.

Expand text

Facilities

Students in the Bill Douglas Cinema Museum

We are exceptionally lucky to have some fantastic facilities and resources on the Streatham Campus.

Special Collections

We have Special Collections relating to writers such as Agatha Christie, Daphne du Maurier, and William Golding, and we integrate these into our teaching so students can share the excitement we have when discovering new insights from manuscripts, letters, and business papers.

The Bill Douglas Cinema Museum

Our unique film and popular culture resource, contains items going back hundreds of years. We regularly take students into its archives and think about the study of literature in relation to visual texts.

Digital Humanities Lab

Digital Humanities is increasingly important in all areas of humanities research, including history, archaeology, literatures and languages. This research space enables the examination, preservation and analysis of historical, literary and visual material. Facilities in the lab include:

  • a flagship seminar room equipped with a 4.2-metre video wall, encouraging interactive engagement in a shared display space
  • two state-of-the-art photography labs, including provision for the 2D digitisation of heritage material and primary sources
  • an audio-visual lab with a recording studio and sound editing suite
  • a MakerSpace equipped with 3D scanning and printing equipment

Your future

Professional experience

With practical modules on offer and opportunity to undertake professional placements, a degree in Communications and Modern Languages will give you plenty of opportunity to develop your professional portfolio which will give you the skills and experience needed to be successful in your chosen career.

Employer-valued skills this course develops

A Communications degree puts you in a great position to succeed in a range of careers. Oral and written communication is at the heart of our programme and you will learn to present your ideas in a variety of formats. You will also develop strong research and analytical skills and the ability to problem solve and make informed decisions. Through a balance of independent study and teamwork you will learn to manage your time and workload effectively.

Career paths

The programme will include module ‘Communications in the Workplace’, within which students will be encouraged to find work placements with providers in the communications and media sector, or projects which will enable them to carry out communication-related projects. In this module, students will undertake one or two work placements. The module will enable students to develop an understanding of how the skills and knowledge acquired as part of the degree apply to the workplace. Through reflexive practice, they will extend relevant work-based skills and knowledge. Students will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of a business or work environment through practical work and to gain experience in the use of technologies and applications commonly used in organisations.

Example careers

Graduates can expect to go on into roles in the following sectors:

• Advertising
• Digital media
• Events organisation
• Film-making
• International relations
• Journalism
• Marketing
• Public relations
• Research
• TV production

Expand text