MPhil/PhD Creative Writing

Duration MPhil: Full time 2-3 years; Part time 4-5 years
PhD: Full time 3-4 years; Part time 6-7 years
Distance Learning available
Discipline
  • English
LocationCornwall (Penryn), Exeter (Streatham)
Start date September, January or April

Overview

A Creative Writing MPhil/PhD at Exeter University combines the supervision of an experienced, published creative writer, with the expertise of literary scholars in an English department regarded for its outstanding research activity and research-led teaching.

The major part of your PhD will consist of an original piece of creative work - in prose fiction, nonfiction or poetry – of a natural volume length. This will sit alongside a 30,000-word thesis of original research placing your creative work in its literary-historical/cultural contexts.

Within the College of Humanities, our Creative Writing programme offers the opportunity for cross-disciplinary research in collaboration with other academics across the Humanities. (Visit our staff profiles for more information on research interests).

Once at Exeter you will engage with a stimulating community of fellow writers, be it through specialised research groups – from Victorian Studies to Poetry and Poetics - or by sharing seminars and workshops with a varied programme of distinguished visiting speakers. The University has particularly strong archive holdings in Twentieth Century West Country writing, with works and papers by, among others, Ted Hughes, Henry Williamson, Daphne du Maurier and William Golding.

Research areas

A summary of our main areas of research focus is provided here. The English and Film research webpages provide more comprehensive details about current research projects. Details on individual staff research interests and publications can be found on the English staff profiles pages.

 

Research centres

Centre for Victorian Studies

The Centre for Victorian Studies (CVS) covers all areas of Victorian Britain and the Empire: culture (high Victorian and fin de siecle literature, gender, and sexuality); science (biology and economics); technology (print, optical and sound media). CVS is an institutional member of the University of California Dickens Project and annually sends one staff member and one advanced research student to California, where they share a week’s academic activities with international Victorianists.  CVS is also active in regular collaborations with the Nineteenth-Century Studies Centre at Birkbeck, the Victorian and late 19th and early 20th-century Divisions of the Modern Language Association of America, the North American Victorian Studies Association, the Australasian Victorian Studies Association, and the British Association for Victorian Studies. We have staff on the editorial boards of every significant Victorianist journal in Britain, North America and Australasia.

18th-Century Narrative Consortium

The Long 18th Century research group hosts the 18th-Century Narrative Consortium which aims to provide a focus for research activities and publications centred on the cultural phenomenon of eighteenth-century narrative. The period that saw the dawn of the novel also witnessed the exponential development of a market for print culture and huge social change.

Exeter Centre for Literatures of Identity, Place and Sustainability (ECLIPSE)

Based at the Penryn Campus in Cornwall, the aim of the Exeter Centre for Literatures of Identity, Place and Sustainability is to facilitate interdisciplinary research into literary representations and constructions of identity and place, dealing with literatures of myth, memory and history, and developing a ‘new’ eco-criticism for the 21st century.

Centre for Literature and Archives

The Centre for Literature and Archives holds many resources and manuscripts in the Special Collections archive, and actively encourages students to engage with this material.

Centre for Intermedia

English staff are also involved in the College's interdisciplinary Centre for Intermedia which promotes advanced transdisciplinary research in performance and the arts through collaborations between artists, academics and scientists from a range of disciplines.

Our academics

Research groups

Please note: Bold name in the following staff list indicates members of staff based at the Cornwall Campus; all others are based in Exeter.

20th Century, Creative Writing and Film Studies

Professor Tim Kendall, Professor Steve Neale, Associate Professor Andy Brown, Dr Jo Gill, Dr Helen Hanson, Dr Joe Kember, Dr James Lyons, Dr Sam North, Dr Maeve Pearson, Dr Jane Poyner, Dr Belinda Castles, and Dr Jane Feaver

The diverse work of this large group includes specialist research on African-American writers; the American South; autobiography and life-writing; American and British modernism; postcolonial literature; Irish poetry; Conrad; Joyce; Lawrence; war poetry; Plath and Hughes; writing the city; South West writing; US cinema; early cinema; digital cinema and animation; film genres; film style, film sound and film history; US TV series and serials. We have creative writing staff working in poetry, screenwriting and fiction.

In 2009 we are hosting the British Association for American Studies Postgraduate Conference, and in 2011 the William Golding Centenary Conference.

19th Century

Professor Regenia Gagnier, Dr Jason Hall, Dr Joe Kember, Dr Joanne Parker, Dr John Plunkett, Dr Maeve Pearson, Dr Angelique Richardson, Dr Paul Young

Our 19th-century research includes specialist work on the fin-de-siècle; social and feminist theory; the New Woman; Victorian psychology; Queen Victoria; Darwinism and eugenics; Victorian poetry; Charles Dickens; and William Morris. Members of the research group have a strong record of attracting large grants for internationally distinguished projects and events. We take part in the University of California Dickens project, sending staff and postgraduates to its annual international events.

The Centre for Victorian Studies runs its own Visiting Speaker series that has included long-term collaborations with distinguished international visitors and it hosts regular international conferences, normally co-sponsored with the British Academy, other universities, professional organisations, or other Exeter research groups. 

18th Century

Professor Jane Spencer, Professor Nick Groom, Dr Robert Mack, Dr Corinna Wagner

Members of the 18th-Century research group specialise in: women poets of the Romantic era; the eighteenth-century novel; epic poetry; transatlantic relations; the development of the literary canon; feminist literary history and theory; oriental tales; Jane Austen; Aphra Behn; Frances Burney; James Fenimore Cooper; Oliver Goldsmith; Thomas Grey; Anna Seward; and Mary Wollstonecraft.

The group hosts the Eighteenth-Century Narrative Project, which focuses on the social, economic, political, sexual and colonial aspects of narrative and which regularly hosts conferences and workshops, including most recently on ‘Narrating the 18th Century’ (2007), ‘Romantic Animals’ (2008) and ‘Reconciling Reform and Revolution in an Age of Reaction’ (2008).

Medieval and Renaissance

Professor Andrew McRae, Professor Gerald MacLean, Dr Pascale Aebischer, Dr Karen Edwards, Professor Marion Gibson, Dr Eddie Jones, Dr Elliot Kendall, Dr Nick McDowell, Dr Henry Power, Dr Philip Schwyzer

The work of this group includes specialist research on the Middle English religious tradition; hermits and anchorites; literature and nationalism; Renaissance drama; satire; witchcraft and magic; politics and patronage; literature of the English Revolution; literature of foreign and domestic travel; science and literature; archaeology and literature; Renaissnace drama in performance on film; Shakespeare; Spenser; Marvell; and Milton. We organise the medieval Exeter Symposium and regularly host conferences and workshops.

Facilities

We have a number of specialist research resources and projects available to postgraduates: The Bill Douglas Cinema Museum is the largest film-related archive in the UK outside the British Film Institute; the Chris Brooks Collection is a major resource for scholars of Romanticism and 19th-century fiction and culture; and the Global Circulation Project on cultures in contact is based in Exeter. Our unique collections of writings and correspondence by authors connected with the South West such as Daphne du Maurier, RD Blackmore, Agatha Christie and Ted Hughes supplement research resources held in the University library.

The University library holds a number of resources important for our research, including the Hypatia Collection of women’s literature and history as well as online resources.

The Queen’s Building (Streatham Campus) and the Peter Lanyon Building (Penryn Campus) offer dedicated postgraduate common rooms with computer facilities and a number of study carrels available for research students.

Students at both campuses have access to a wealth of online information including: over 400 online journal titles; Early English Books Online (which contains facsimile texts of virtually all books printed in England, 1475-1700); the extensive Gale Eighteenth Century Collections Online (ECCO) research archive; search tools such as FirstSearch; the digital archive JSTOR; and other similar databases providing access to full text articles.

Careers

We are committed to ensuring you receive high quality research supervision to maximise your potential and prepare you for a rewarding career.

Postgraduates also have access to the wide range of support offered by our Career Zone. In addition, postgraduate research students can access our Postgraduate Researchers' Programme, which covers a range of topics to help you to succeed during your research degree and to act as a springboard for your research career.

Graduate destinations

Below are some examples of initial jobs undertaken by English postgraduates who studied with us in recent years.

Please note that due to data protection, the job titles and organisations are listed independently and do not necessarily correspond.

Job titleOrganisation
Assistant Producer
Associate Lecturer
College Lecturer
Contract Manager
Editorial Assistant
Freelance Writer
Information Assistant
Investment Director
Journalist
Lecturer
Ministry Assistant
Pharmacy Manager
PR Account Executive
Researcher
Social Media Content Executive
Teacher
Translator
Writer
Brandon Hill Communications
Datamatics Global Services Limited
Harper Collins
Ministry of Education
National Trust
Palgrave Macmillan
Penguin
RBS
Royal Literary Fund
SISU Capital
Studio Micali
The Big Picture Company
The Express Tribune
University of Exeter

Entry requirements 2018

If you are considering applying to this course, you should possess a honed talent for creative writing evident in your creative sample and writing experience, as well as a clear proposal demonstrating your ambition to create a piece of work to a publishable standard. In reviewing your application we will consider the strength and potential of your writing sample and proposed creative work, as well as the ability of our staff and resources to support you through completion of your work. Applicants will generally have achieved a first or upper second class honours degree (or equivalent), and an MA with merit (or comparable achievement). Evidence of publication, though not a necessity, is highly desirable.

All students are initially registered for the MPhil, with the expectation of being upgraded later in their studies, if appropriate, to the PhD programme.

Application guidance

Our online learning resource 'Considering a UK PhD?' provides lots of helpful advice and information from staff and students about the PhD experience at Exeter.

You may wish to read our general advice for PhD applicants webpages, which give tips on how to put together a successful research degree application.

Applicants for research programmes are also advised to visit the College's webpages to check for specific advice (see further information link). Here you will be able to find out about staff research interests and make preliminary enquiries about supervision. We advise that you do this before applying.

Requirements for international students

If you are an international student, please visit our international equivalency pages to enable you to see if your existing academic qualifications meet our entry requirements.

English language requirements

IELTS (Academic)

Overall score 7.0 with a minimum score of 6.5 in the writing component and all other sections no less than 6.0.

TOEFL IBT*

Overall score 100 with minimum scores of 25 for writing, 21 for listening, 22 for reading and 23 for speaking.

Pearson Test of English (Academic)

65 with no less than 58 in all communicative skills.

Cambridge English: Advanced & Proficiency

Overall score 185 with a minimum score of 176 in the writing component and all other sections no less than 169.

Pre-sessional English

Applicants with lower English language test scores may be able to take pre-sessional English at INTO University of Exeter prior to commencing their programme. See our English language requirements page for more information.

Finance: fees and funding

Tuition fees per year 2018/19

  • UK/EU: £4,400 full-time; £2,200 part-time
  • International: £16,400 full-time

Fee information

Fees can normally be paid by two termly instalments and may be paid online. For further information about paying fees see our Student Fees pages.

Current available funding

Contact us

College of Humanities
Postgraduate Administrator
Phone: +44 (0)1392 725306
Email: humanities-pgradmissions@exeter.ac.uk

Apply online Visit subject website Print course

Why study English at Exeter?

Professor Regenia Gagnier tells us about what it's like to study English at PhD level and the types of placement opportunities available for postgraduate students at Exeter.